maximum point blank range

8x68s

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Salem, Oregon
Certainly not a new topic but one that I discovered a long time ago and brought up as a "refresher". It works for me but I don't shoot beyond 400 yards because that is my limit with this process. Not dissing LR or ELR hunting. Just a bit of old school brought forward...
 

YZ-80

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Feb 20, 2019
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Maryland
Thanks for sharing this. I always like articles by Ron Spomer. I too, am pretty much limited to 400 yards, and most shots actually end up being in the 250 range. I always sight for a 200 yard “0”. I’m afraid to sight 3” high at 100 yards because I’ve destroyed a lot of backstraps hitting high on deer that I think are further away then they actually were!
 

wv270wsm

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May 10, 2016
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I too use this method . Works very well in Wv most shots are within 200 unless you’re sitting a power or gas line right of way. I’m usually right about 2 1/2 “ high at 100 and that’s pretty well spot on for a mpbr out to about 385 or so .
 

J E Custom

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Before scopes were readily adjustable this process was very Popular, and useful if shots were within the MPBR. When ranges got longer it wasn't practical and we started using Mil Dot scopes. Then with the advent of precision turrets and adjustments, the longer ranges were not a problem and accurate POI's were possible.

If your hunting is 0 to 300 yards it is still a viable method as long as you don't take iffy shots. like most back then, if we hit within 2" of what we were aiming at we were happy. With all of the precision equipment we have today it has almost become a lost art. :)

Just My opinion

J E CUSTOM
 

26Reload

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Dec 25, 2016
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Before my moa scopes all my rifles were set to either 250 or 300 depending upon caliber.....
260, 2506 at 250yds...easily reach 300...
7wsm, 7rm at 300yds....easily reach 400...
Coastal hunting in timber didn't allow for much difference...but there were always the logging clearcuts.....
had to be versatile.....
 

RockyMtnMT

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MPBR is a great way to look at your hunting. Whether you are a ELR guy or not. I have considered myself a long range hunter for the last 15y. It has taken me a while to really wrap my head around the MPBR concept. I used to zero my rifles at 300y, which was kinda close to MPBR. It is easier than that. Zero your rifle at whatever range, then use a ballistics app like JBM and it will tell you what your MPBR zero is. Then dial up from your set zero to that. Now if your MPBR is 450y all you have to do is get a range on the target and if it is less than your PBR all you have to do is aim in the middle. Deed done. If it is farther than that then you can make your calcs and dial up from there.
 

memtb

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We do, and have for over 25 years did a 300 yard zero. We approximately 10” low at 400 yards....so, on big game, “hold on hair” from muzzle to 400 yards. The only caveat, is that at approximately 180 yards, we’re about 6” high, no problem on big game .... if you hold in the middle. Though, if you’re shooting coyote, Fox, etc, you just remember to hold a bit low. You get real comfortable with the process.

With our Leopold CDS scopes, we kept our 300 yard zero. If the animal appears to be beyond 400, a rangefinder is used, then scope adjusted. Using the 300 yard zero on the Leopold CDS, allows us to use the “zero stop” function....yet will carry us to 850+ yards ( in one dial rotation) which is beyond our “comfort zone” for shooting game! memtb
 

UplandFreak

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Western US
I only use it for coyote hunting. I use a 6” target size for my MPBR. Its works well. If it is further away I use a range finder and dial. All of my guns are zeroed at 100, I spin the turret to mpbr zero while I am out hunting.
 

memtb

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I suck pretty bad at range estimation. The LRF is what makes any of it possible regardless of technique for me.
I’m not as good as I was several years ago. I used to, while on a hike or at work ( large facility), pick out objects of various sizes, “guesstimate” the distance, and then count off the steps. Doing this for many years got me pretty good out to 300 +. Since retirement, I don’t have the opportunities I once had. However, with a 100 and 300 yard range right out the back door, looking at the target frames almost daily, and knowing the distance can’t hurt with range “guesstimates” ! memtb
 

cohunt

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Jan 21, 2016
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Colorado Springs, CO
I use it, but I also dial for longer distances-- I dont use BDC/hash marks any more as I found I am slightly more accurate when I dial at distance rather than using drop marks -- me or the scope? not sure, but I tested it lots and every time I can shoot smaller groups when I dial and use the cross hairs rather than the drop marks
 

Coyote_Hunter

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All of my rifles get zeroed for MPBR using a 6" diameter target. Have been doing that for decades.

I personally think 8" is too large as the mid-range trajectory will be 4" above line of sight.

a 6" MPBR typically works out to be around 2-1/2" high at 100 yards with MPBR between 240 and 430 yards depending on the cartridge and load.

Out to 300 yards I can generally aim and fire with no worry about hold over. Out to 500 I don't even need a BDC reticle, although I tend to use them at 400 and beyond as almost all my rifles have them.

My lever guns also get MPBR zeroed for a 6: target but the lower velocities and B.C. levels put them in a different class than than my other centerfires. A 6" target MPBR for my .45-70 results in a 22" drop at 300 yards.

.
 

J E Custom

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Jul 29, 2004
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Another thing to keep in mine is the size of your MPBR spread. Some hold it to 6" and some used 8" depending on the game hunted. My preference was 6" 3'' low to 3'' high for dear sized game. 8" just seemed to much error for me. For many years I combined the Mill dot recital with the MPBR process and knew where each mill dot zero was. This allowed me to make quick shots to 300 yards and use the mill dots for the longer shots.

It worked good (Not great) but with the advent of Laser range finders and good adjustable/repeatable scopes this soon out paced the older system.

J E CUSTOM
 

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