Maine Bear Hunting Outfitter

Discussion in 'Bear Hunting' started by nchunter182, Jun 15, 2018.


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  1. nchunter182

    nchunter182 Well-Known Member

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    Feb 12, 2012
    Just returned from a spring hunt and wanted to give a recommendation to the outfitter we used. Matagamon Wilderness was the outfitter and can highly recommend them if you are looking for a NE bear hunt. They offer both spring and fall hunts. Hunting is done over bait in VERY thick woods so this is not a long range hunt. Shots will range from 20-75 yards depending on where they put you. Both tree stands and ground blinds are used. Would be a good opportunity for bow hunters also as they have stands that are set up for bow hunters. I shot my bear with a rifle at 22 yards from one of these stands. They even have ground blinds that will accommodate a wheelchair bound hunter. The lodge and some of the cabins are also wheel chair accessible which is a nice feature if you are a disabled hunter. The people there are great and really make you feel welcome. Food was fantastic!!!
    There were 5 hunters in camp this past week. 3 tagged out, 1 shot but didn't recover and 1 didn't get a shot. He saw a big boar but it didn't stick around the barrel long enough to get on him. The week before there were 6 hunters in camp. 4 tagged out and one passed on a small bear. Maine bears are not real big but they seem to have plenty of them. I'm told the average is around 150#. My spring bear was a small 130# boar and one I took in fall 2016 was 200#. They have taken +400# bears out of that area and have some nice mounts in the lodge. I saw several sows with first year cubs so the future is looking good!
    Jay
     
  2. muley guy

    muley guy Member

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    Apr 19, 2012
    Curious about the date. I am a teacher by trade and cannot get out until Memorial weekend when school is done for the year. Is that too late for a hunt? Also, what rifle/load did you use or would recommend?
     
  3. nchunter182

    nchunter182 Well-Known Member

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    Feb 12, 2012
    Hi,
    I think that date would work. The outfitter only gets 12 tags for the spring hunt so only two weeks are available. I was part of the group that went for the second week which started June 3rd. That would put the first week starting May 28th which was Memorial day. Like I said, only 12 tags are available so check into it early.
    I used a Mauser 98 sporter chambered in 375 Winchester with the 235gr Speer bullets. Oddball for sure but I built it to meet Ohio's caliber restrictions for deer hunting. I used it to take both bears and both were pass through shots. I would think most anything would do since this is close up shooting. The previous outfitter I used recommended 308 Winchester or better. A scope with an illuminated reticle is highly recommended. It gets dark quick in the thick timber and seeing a black reticle against a black bear in fading light is tough. It will extend your shooting time some and allow better shot placement.
    Good luck!
    Jay
     
    HARPERC likes this.
  4. LoneTraveler

    LoneTraveler Well-Known Member

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    Feb 7, 2014
    I have hunted black bear in Maine 2 times. One in the Great North Woods (Gated North West part of Maine, Outfitter Foggy Mountain. One was near New Brunswick border in Eastern Maine, Outfitter Spruce Mountain Lodge and Guide service. The Bear I killed in killed with Spruce Mountain was a beautiful bear Large white throat patch and 2 small white strips on each side of the neck. Steve said it was an Imigrant from New Brunswick. If you like to Brook Trout fish, We had a blast with Foggy Mountain every stream in Great North Woods area was full of trout.
     
  5. HARPERC

    HARPERC Well-Known Member

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    Had one in a Ruger N0. 3 worked great within it's limits.
     
  6. Rhino Hunter

    Rhino Hunter Well-Known Member

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    Jun 16, 2010
    I hunted with Foggy Mountain years ago. The owner was Wayne Bosowicz (sp?) if I remember correctly. I remember he was incredibly knowledgeable about black bears and genuinely concerned about his hunters enjoying themselves and tagging a bear also. Hell of a good man!
     
  7. Capt RB

    Capt RB Well-Known Member

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    Dec 1, 2014
    +1 Wayne was great to us when we use to hunt Me in the 80's.
     
  8. Pa Grizz

    Pa Grizz Well-Known Member

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    Feb 8, 2014
    Did not matter where I ran into him Nashville,Vegas or the Harrisburg show he always had time to talk.I walked past his booth in Harrisburg one year and he followed me to the end of the isle and asked me if I was to good to say hello .I miss our talks.
     
  9. Rhino Hunter

    Rhino Hunter Well-Known Member

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    Yep, that’s the Wayne B. I know and remember. The world needs more people like Wayne.
     
  10. Brian koontz

    Brian koontz New Member

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    Jan 9, 2019
    Are the hunts in Maine?
     
  11. Pa Grizz

    Pa Grizz Well-Known Member

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    Feb 8, 2014
    Check out Randy Bossie at Dean's Den in Soldier Pond Maine.He could take more hunters but he like to get to know everyone instead of you handing him a check and he give's you a guide.His wife,guides and cook will also get to know you.It's just the way he want's it run.Contact him at 207-227-7620. You will go back
     
  12. Alibiiv

    Alibiiv Well-Known Member

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    Jun 17, 2013
    I want to state that this has NOTHING to do with any of the outfitters that have been mentioned on this thread; NOTHING. I would like to suggest asking some questions when selecting a outfitter/guide for bear hunting (or any hunting trip) to help make your hunting experience a rewarding hunt. If you are buying the meal plan always ask what is on the menu, who is doing the cooking and ask to see the menu. I suggest that you don't just accept "home cooked meals"; tater tots, wings and pizza are not home cooked meals (yup been there/done that!). One outfitter gave us a good breakfast, lunch within a couple of hours from breakfast, then gave us a sandwich for our dinner out in the field; and, dessert when we came in from hunting at 8:30-9:30 PM.. My son is allergic to turkey, and was given a turkey sandwich for out in the field; didn't work to well for him. Another outfitter gave us prepared food from CASCO and BJs stores; that's not home-cooked meals. Presently we take the option of preparing our own meals if it is available. Usually it is $300-500 less than a hunt with the meal plan. We prepare great breakfasts, and make a decent lunch. We bring a number of frozen home cooked meals for dinner, but also bring a large jar of peanut butter and our favorite jellies or jam. Usually by the time we get in from hunting, put all of our gear away in totes and change up we're not really into having a large meal and going to bed; PB&J always works:rolleyes::rolleyes:

    I have been bear hunting in Maine for many years and have used a few outfitters. I found the most important question to ask is "what is the hunter to guide ratio". I recommend nothing more that 4-5 hunters per guide. One outfitter that I hunted with had a 15-1 hunter/guide ratio, out of 30+ hunters 7 bear were taken; this was the only year that I did not harvest a bear. The hunter/guide ratio is important because if you are the first one put in to the stand, that means you are the last one picked up. With the 15-1 ratio hunt that I mentioned earlier, I spent one night out until 10:45 PM waiting to be picked up with a 45 minute ride back to camp. Fortunately I had a backpack with snacks and a fleece jacket strapped to the top of the pack; the fleece jacket save my a$$ that night. There was no phone service, I didn't know if I had been forgotten and had no way to contact anyone; and, I was at least 10-15 miles in the woods, and due to the numerous turns and roads didn't even know where I was. There was a hunter who shot a bear, it went off running in the woods, he decided to go in and track it down, it got dark, the guy got turned around and the "idiot" got lost. The guides had to find him, and due to the hunter/guide ratio there was no one to come pick my up until he was found.

    Other good questions to ask for bear hunting Maine is when the baiting season started for the outfitter (when did the outfitter start his baiting season) it ought to be at least three weeks prior to hunting season, how often are the sites baited (ought to be every day whether the site is used or not), and how many sites are available for hunters; what is the hunter/bait site ratio. Sometimes you will can be put on a site where you have a nocturnal bear that you will never see, it is good to have the option of another site (or no bears hitting the baits). If your site is changed for any reason, a good question to ask is when was the new site last hunter hunted off, and also how when was the new site opened and how often had it been baited since it was opened.

    It may not mean too much to some hunters, however asking what the wash room/toilet facilities are like "might" be a good idea. Doesn't sound like too much until you find a hole in the ground with a tarp over it as a latrine!! Our last outfitter had four outhouses with 30+ guys using them; try getting into an outhouse right after breakfast and three cups of coffee:(:(!!! We were the second week of hunters in, so the place had 30+ guys using them the week before us; nice. We like to shower with Scent-away or DOWNWIND before we go out into the field. Some outfitters will advertise showers, a good question to ask about is how many hunters are going to be sharing facilities is going to be for stuff like showers, again we had 30+ hunters sharing "1" shower; so by mid-week guess what the place looked like? Again knowing how many hunters are going to be in the camp during your week of hunting is important to know. I'd just like to add that we are not primadonna's, we've done our share of primitive camping, it's just that we feel that if we are paying good money (and it's advertised) for a hunt, we ought to be getting what we pay for.

    I think that the best way to find a good outfitter is a site like this, or word of mouth from another hunter. I like to hunt with an outfitter who has no more than 8-10 guys for the week if at all possible. It only takes one idiot to spoil a great hunt. Whether we like it, or realize it or not, you're/we're pretty much married to these guys for the week; so....I suggest that you do your research and homework before booking. Asking about additional fees like skinning or processing of meat or hides also is a good question. Sometimes contacting the local game warden for the area you want to hunt in is a good resource; ask if there had/have been any infractions. I've had some great hunts with some great outfitters, my last outfitter went out of business after many years. I can only suggest that if you find a good outfitter stay with him. I hope that this dissertation has provided some good questions and insight about what to look for when booking a bear hunt (or any hunt) with an outfitter.