Magnum obsession seems real

Holycity73

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412
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Charleston SC
I’ve hunted in a few states. Never used a magnum other than a .257Wby and that was only on paper.
I mainly hunt with a 6.5 Creedmoor and rarely exceed 350y on game. Most shots here in SC are under 150.
Now, it seems like every time a cartridge discussion comes up, 7mm or greater mags are the go to.
I know that some folks on here feel that velocity and mass will always trump a well placed shot and we are called Long Range Hunting, but at what point is a magnum necessary?
I guess what I’m asking is at what point did you decide a magnum was the best all around cartridge for you?

In the nature of full disclosure, I also currently own a 6.5PRC, had a 6.5x284, 257WBY and a 300WM(never fired 😕). The PRC’s performance(a hunter) reminds me most of my 6.5x284, which was an F Classer.

I’m also considering having a new WSM built. So there’s that.
 
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jpd676

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Oct 28, 2010
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Jackson Hole, WY
It is all relative. I moved to Wyoming and got tired of glassing huge bucks and giant bulls one or two canyons over (the mulies here are pretty big too). I learned to shoot long range to give me a better advantage on the big boys and I hunt with a magnum not thinking my poorly placed shot will still kill but because I am hunting in some really nasty county and don't want to track animals in it. Having an adequate caliber in this area is a must. I've killed plenty of deer, elk and antelope with a .260 and a .308 but use a magnum because I don't like to be underguned.
 

LVJ76

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Feb 2, 2019
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Tucson, Arizona
With a magnum you can reach out further and with more punch. The right Heavier bullet does hit harder and you can't always shoot heavier with non magnum cartridges.

I've been a fan and have used the 7mm-08 for over 30 years, but the 7mm Rem Mag is slowly taking over, I simply love it, again it hits harder and reaches out further with higher BC bullets.

Bigger is better!
 

Creedmoor shooter

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Monroe, Newhampshire
I think there is a fun factor with magnum rounds that isnt there with the smaller rounds. Same can be said with the smaller rounds vs magnums. I use to use the 6.5 creed for everything. Still would if I didn't make the rifle so heavy that I couldn't carry it. Most times now the 7mm mag gets the nod just because its lighter. Some of it is some people think you need to a hand cannon to kill even a whitetail. I've heard guys actually say the 7mm rem mag was not sufficient for deer. My father and grandfather stacked up deer for many years with their 7mm mags. Funny thing is, neither of them hunt with magnums anymore. They both learned it just wasnt necessary I guess. There are legitimate times when that magnum is needed, but most times I'd say it's a "just because I want one"
 

GLTaylor

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Oct 11, 2019
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Cedar Bluff, Al
Holy City,
I too live in the SE. Have way too many rifles and love them all.
Like you, i prefer extreme accuracy. Also, here, a long shot would be 400 yds - and that would be on a crop field or clear cut. We don't have the need for minor cannons. Our deer average 125 lbs. Or less. I have gotten rid of all my magnums but one - and it is being kept for a 1500 yd shot on a prairie dog, if i ever go back.
I prefer the 6mm, 25 or 6.5 for my applications. More than sufficient IMO.
 

Bang4theBuck

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Nov 19, 2013
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312
First of all, I'm not co.pletely sure what defines a magnum. And even if I did know, I think some cartridges are deserving of the magnum designation that dont have it right now. That might be a good post for later, but not the question here. In my opinion, the answer is pretty simple, and for me is data driven. What conditions will I encounter in the way of shot distance? What velocity do I need to achieve proper bullet performance (per manufacturers rec.). What is the margin of error that I want to afford myself as it relates to the numbers. Then find bullet/cartridge combo that gets me to that value. One thing that should also be said is that I have seen guys shoot whitetails with too much gun. 4years ago, a friend lit the wick on his Christiansen 300Rum on a Big North Texas whitetail (over 225 lbs). He shot the buck, and then an hour later the buck showed up again with a through and through type wound in high lung area. He took him down with a second shot in the high shoulder area, but it too pencilled through the animal at that short distance, and high velocity. To me, with max shots in that area being 200 yds, he was over gunned and it almost cost him his hunt.
 
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jasent

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Nov 16, 2010
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602
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deer park, wa 99006
I can understand why many of the eastern or central state folks don’t need a magnum, heck I’ve killed tons of deer with my 243. But some of the places I hunt most shot opportunities are 400-1000 yards in country that can take you an hour to travel half mile or less. In situations like this I want to make that shot with confidence that the critter will be dead right where I shot it. With the winds you can run into shooting from mountain to mountain you want a heavy fast bullet to limit windage errors.
With short seasons, low game populations, and crowded hunting areas you use whatever will give you that one up and hopefully get some meat in the freezer
 

AZShooter

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Dec 12, 2005
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Tucson Az
Over gunned? No such thing. Poor bullet placement or poor bullet performance.

Many of my friends use a 300 RUM for all their big game hunting from the tiny coues to elk here in Az. It is a great 30 cal long range killler but will still mash um flat at close ranges. I use my 300 RUM exclusively for elk and it has never disappointed even at 50 yds.
 

Bill Cauley Jr

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Mar 1, 2016
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Tn
It is all relative. I moved to Wyoming and got tired of glassing huge bucks and giant bulls one or two canyons over (the mulies here are pretty big too). I learned to shoot long range to give me a better advantage on the big boys and I hunt with a magnum not thinking my poorly placed shot will still kill but because I am hunting in some really nasty county and don't want to track animals in it. Having an adequate caliber in this area is a must. I've killed plenty of deer, elk and antelope with a .260 and a .308 but use a magnum because I don't like to be underguned.
Of course shot distance is the main reason to go to a magnum in my opinion
 

Bill Cauley Jr

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First of all, I'm not co.pletely sure what defines a magnum. And even if I did know, I think some cartridges are deserving of the magnum designation that dont have it right now. That might be a good post for later, but not the question here. In my opinion, the answer is pretty simple, and for me is data driven. What conditions will I encounter in the way of shot distance? What velocity do I need to achieve proper bullet performance (per manufacturers rec.). What is the margin of error that I want to afford myself as it relates to the numbers. Then find bullet/cartridge combo that gets me to that value. One thing that should also be said is that I have seen guys shoot whitetails with too much gun. 4years ago, a friend lit the wick on his Christiansen 300Rum on a Big North Texas whitetail (over 225 lbs). He shot the buck, and then an hour later the buck showed up again with a through and through type wound in high lung area. He took him down with a second shot in the high shoulder area, but it too pencilled through the animal at that short distance, and high velocity. To me, with max shots in that area being 200 yds, he was over gunned and it almost cost him his hunt.
Pretty much the same thing happened to me once on a hunt I was on a gas pipeline with my 338 Lapua magnum I shot an eight point and a doe at 220 and 212yards within 40 minutes of each other they both ran off but died about 60 yards away went through so fast never really expanded the exit wound was quite small then the last doe of the day came out at 413 yards and pretty much gutted her on the spot so yes I agree with what you have just said
AF6FB339-7286-427E-AD49-4821293FEEE8.jpeg
 
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Jonoton

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Feb 1, 2017
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50
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Texas
I built a big, heavy 7mm WSM because, at the time, I thought I needed one rifle to do-it-all. Elk at long range (1k) was the heavy duty end of my imagined spectrum of use. It does shoot very well and is a reliable game getter. The 13 pounds all together , and 29+ " of barrel and brake, are cumbersome.

I now know that I am not going to shoot an elk past 600 or so. I wish I'd have bought a quiver of Tikka T3 rifles from big to small, for what I put into this 7MM.
 

Guy M

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Jun 4, 2007
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767
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Chelan Co, Washington
About 11 years ago, anticipating a hunt for grizzly, and another for cape buff, I bought my first 375 H&H, as that seemed an appropriate cartridge, without being too ridiculous for black bear or elk. This one is a Ruger Number One.




Later, a second nice, used 375 Winchester Model 70 seemed to just throw itself at me, and I took it home too. Both have proven to be great rifles.






I shot a few black bear with the Number One. Unnecessarily powerful, but it worked fine.

Ended up taking the grizzly with my 30-06, and am pretty sure I'll never get around to the cape buff hunt... So, have two nice 375's that are more unnecessary now than they were when I got them. :)

I still like 'em though. Fun to handload, actually pretty pleasant to shoot. Don't need them, but I do like them.

Guy
 

Korhil78

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Jun 22, 2011
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Location
New Mexico
When I lived in Texas, all we ever hunted was whitetail deer. I never had any other rifle than a 25-06 and it was very accurate. Never really shot anything over 200 yards there. When I moved to New Mexico, things opened up for shooting distance CONSIDERABLY and elk and oryx were now in the picture for hunting. At first, I learned how to shoot LR with that 25-06 but only at targets. I eventually jumped all the way up to a 338 Lapua Magnum. That was the most accurate rifle that I have owned to date. I soon realized that I didn't really need that much rifle for the distances that I wanted to shoot animals at which was 800 yards and under. I sold that rifle and now have 2 custom rifles. One in 6.5 Sherman shooting 140 gr bergers which I use for deer and antelope and a 7mm Sherman MAX shooting 195 gr bergers for elk and oryx. If you find using muzzle brakes acceptable then you will be able to shoot a magnum cartridge with non-magnum recoil and will also find that you can spot your shots at distance and be more accurate while shooting due to the low recoil.
 

Guy M

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Jun 4, 2007
Messages
767
Location
Chelan Co, Washington
Also - unlike the OP - I seem to be seeing fewer and fewer magnums at the range and on hunts. Am thinking a lot of hunters may have decided that something with less muzzle blast & recoil can get the job done just fine.

Mostly I hunt with my 30-06 & 25-06 rifles, but I freely admit, I'm not much of a "long range" hunter anyway. Except coyotes. Coyotes I will shoot at any range that looks safe. :)

Guy
 

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