Lunar calender- importance to planning timing of hunt

Discussion in 'Maps, GPS and Google Earth' started by wildcat westerner, Nov 8, 2018.

  1. wildcat westerner

    wildcat westerner Well-Known Member

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    Nov 14, 2009
    Hello,
    I am writing this for the many who will be using this particular site for planning their hunts next year.
    A few years ago I retired to New Mexico, and when I legally became a resident I applied for what is well known as the best public land hunt in this state 2-b, right next to the Jicarilla Apache reservation that charges you over $13,000.00 for a deer hunt, if you are lucky on the draw.
    I picked a date, and got lucky the second time I applied. This is high altitude country, close to the Colorado border. When I went on my hunt I saw more Mule deer than any time I have hunted previously across seven states and two provinces, 64 deer in four days.
    But, I had failed to check with a lunar calendar and there was a full moon during the five day period of this hunt. With my maps and satellite images, I was ready to be in the best place I felt where five drainages met at a creek choked with willows. Thus I saw a lot of deer: Does, fawns, yearlings and forkies. What I was truly interested in was probably feeding at 2 am in the bright moonlight. I could see the handwriting on the wall and did return home early, and also wiser.
    Therefore I am suggesting to the interested hunters to download a PDF file United States lunar calendar for 2019. If you have choices for hunting times in an area, avoiding full moon situations should be a factor in your planning.
    Good Luck,

    Gene S.
     
    Wheeler co likes this.
  2. cohunt

    cohunt Well-Known Member

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    hunting pressure in general will make the "big boys" go nocturnal --- animals are smarter than most give them credit for

    I go to an area for elk hunting where the bull feed in the wee hours of the morning in an open meadow near the top of the hill, before day brake they head down the hill to find a deep dark hole in stupid steep terrain to hide in (usually on private property)--then they wait till after sunset to move back up the hill to the meadow again... Only chance you've got is to try to follow them to find where they will be at day brake to get a legal shot--- they do not care if its full moon or no moon once the hunting pressure is on they put on their NV goggles ;-)

    for some reason they don't seem to like hunters very much -- go figure
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2018
  3. wildcat westerner

    wildcat westerner Well-Known Member

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    Hello cohunt,

    Right hunters and man turned mammals (deer and elk,in particular) into nocturnal animals to survive. Elk were plains animals when Custer roamed the west and he shoot Elk and Antelope on th same day.

    Note, if you read closely that I advocated using the lunar calendar is a SINGLE factor in your hunt planning. You hunt in Nevada, I was speaking of an experience in New Mexico. New Mexico is the forth largest state in the Union with the third smallest state population. It's possible to make a Mule deer hunt near Tremintina NM, and never see another hunter in the entire season. Thus hunting pressure in some states and certain areas can vary considerably. Many factors go into choices as to future hunting. Lunar calendar awareness is one of them.

    GS
     
  4. Wheeler co

    Wheeler co Active Member

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    Jan 29, 2018
    Wildcat is right on the money - hunting pressure or not. Just went tru the pain of another first season elk season on a full moon. If I knew how, I’d send you a picture of an 8x8 that left the alfalfa and walked by the game cam, a mile away, at 4:00 am. Tons of tracks, all made well before daylight. We used figure F&G set the seasons with that in mind