LOP

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Baboltin

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Jul 25, 2017
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I thought this would be the cheapest way to see for sure you want to get a longer LOP .

here is a couple links .

this one adds 3/4" or 1" depending on the needed size


full selection

Thank you
 
nksmfamjp

nksmfamjp

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IMO, it is pretty important, although with light kicking rifles, a bit short is ok.

LOP is the measurement from trigger to center of the rear face of the butt pad. It impacts head to scope fit, as well as trigger pulling arm comfort and your ability to mount the rifle, especially offhand. I find it mostly impacts speed of building a position, but probably impacts field accuracy.

I find the best way to find lop is to mount a rifle over and over while adding and removing spacers…cardboard or something about 0.25” thick. If you have a scope, it may have to be moved some. Once you find that ideal lop, then ask yourself, will I likely wear a coat, body armor, etc? If so, subtract some. Will I likely be pulling in firmly, add about 1/8” to 1/4”. Are my shoulder positions right? Long lop’s make you less square to target, but too short can be hard to be repeatably that square to target. Find your natural point of aim.

Good luck. At 6’3”, my hunting rifles are about 14”.
 
Wolf76

Wolf76

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I have monkey arms and need 14-14.25" LOP. Factory guns feel like youth models to me. Without the longer lop, my eye is sitting very close to the scope and the overall fit is "off".
Everyone talks about arm length....while neglecting the head and neck dimensions. Your head should naturally come to the stock in the right location. If you need to artificially move your head to get it in the proper position...the stock configuration needs adjustments.

Short story......... many years ago I picked up a tc encore from the gun rack and instantly fell in love with how it felt/fit. I wasn't educated much about guns at that time, but I shot that gun (still do) like it was an extension of my body. I know now that it was the 14+" lop and the grip area. Everybody the shoulders that gun says the same thing I said 2 decades ago. They love the way it feels...even though they don't know "why".
 
Aussie Hunter Steve

Aussie Hunter Steve

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Like slip on a longer recoil pad over the already mounted one ?
Yes.
I do this with my Weatherby Mark V’s because I don’t want alter the factory stock.
Some rifles I’ve swapped out the standard recoil pad for a thicker (1 3/8”) pad.
 
J

jrock

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Mar 12, 2014
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I'm on the opposite spectrum at 5'-9" and found that a 13" LOP is my ticket. The right LOP is much more comfortable to shoot in any position. The shooting position matters. I can get away with a 1/2" longer LOP standing or sitting than when prone. Same goes for scope position, grip angle, and distance from the trigger to the grip. I have a shotgun with a LOP that is 14" but the thing I don't like about it is that the distance from the trigger to the grip is way too far, especially with gloves on. I recommend to play around with your setups and find what works for you. Take good measurements or have a friend help with that while you are in different shooting positions. It may not be worth changing all your stocks but might be worth it on specific setups.
 
445 supermag

445 supermag

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Ok i was about to get a custom rifle made and spoke with a very accomplished rifle smith from here Alex Wheeler on the phone. When we spoke about stocks i askedbfor a longer LOP like 14.5" and he asked why. I told him when i was in a gun store looki g at a beautiful SS,16guage shotty that it was perfect. I dont mean close or pretty dang good. I'm talking perfect as if this gun was built for me like a custom suit.

I am like you 6'3" with longggg arms. I shoot true 32" bow that is when i do archery. I was measured by a pro archery shop and after he took my measurements he yelled hey johnny this dude really has a 32 " draw.

So back to Alex, he said that is totally different with regarding shotguns to rifles. Shottys need to be brought up instantaneously in as close to perfection for fit and make a good shot. ( Yes i hear you say well i could jump something and need the same thing. Kind of but your rifle has a bit more reach. ) rifles on the other hand you snuggle up to them get that perfect alignment and make your shot.

Maybe not word for word but pretty much the idea. Albeit i get the fast shot close range. But thats not the norm but the exception unless you just drive animals on your hunt.


My .02cents

Brian
 
PatriotHenry

PatriotHenry

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IMHO, LOP is far more important to have right on a shotgun than a rifle. As long as you have room to manipulate the scope position, I could live with probably +/- 1/2" on a rifle. On a shotgun - maybe + 1/8 -0. YMMV
Agreed! If a scattergun does not fit it will kick the poop out of you and your hit percentage will be bad. Rifles, not nearly as important if you have good form.
 
P

Pro2A

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May 23, 2009
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So I have a question for you all, I have always shot standard LOP stocked rifles, for my whole life. Being as though I am 6’4” and probably could benefit from a longer LOP stock, would you suggest I swap out all of my stocks to a longer LOP stock on all of my rifles? What is the pros and cons to a longer stock for someone built like myself? Or is the benefit really worth the cost it would be to swap out multiple stocks on multiple rifles? Thanks.
Are you using the old "finger tip pad @ 90deg to elbow crook length" method to determine your required LOP? I've never found that LOP measurement to have any effect on my rifle.....or even scattergun.....shooting precision. For rifles, once a proper recoil management position build......."shoulders/body mid-line squared to the bore axis".....rather than "little green army man angle" build.....is established, I work off of consistent natural point of aim around my cheek weld/scope eyebox/length to shoulder pocket. Never have found former LOP measurement method to be involved in this fit process. For scatterguns, and widely varying around clothes system worn, I'm working around how smoothly, quickly the natural point of aim builds during gun mounting from ready carry position....never shoot pre-shoulder mounted even skeet/trap, as that's not useful for me in bird hunting. Of course, scatterguns may have cast and drop issues depending how sadistically screwed up your mommy and daddy made you. Just a really, really old geezer's experience.....whose firearms have not been the weak link for going on many years. Firearm technology races forward nearing speed of light, yet struggling to compensate for old geezerism dwindling performance. YMMV. Finding what actually works for yourself is what matters. After all, people do, but the bullet never lies.
 
Last edited:
Tulsa Reiner

Tulsa Reiner

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Think about this: For adult males, variation in torso length and leg length (the major sources of height differences) are not going to affect where your cheek falls on the comb when you aim. Shoulder width and (to a small degree) muscularity will, as will neck length. But neck length in adult men changes very little as height changes. I also don't see how increased arm length is going to increase your LOP. It just means the flexion of the elbow will be a little more than average. So don't assume that being taller, or having longer arms than average, will require a longer LOP.
(This is based on my knowledge of human anatomy, not any expertise in fitting stocks.)
 
nksmfamjp

nksmfamjp

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I agree it is less important on a big game rifle or bolt rifle in general, but getting it close really feels better.

That said too long sucks! I have a DGR sitting at 14 3/8 at my request that needs 3/8” taken out. I’m gonna request the 1/2” spacer be removed and then refit it. At 14 1/8, I’d probably be fine, but I’m going a bit shorter to be sure….I think it will end up 13 7/8”
 
B

Baboltin

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Well all of this is making sense thanks everyone
 
S

Sage70

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Wild & Free Oklahoma
I classify rifle stock in two categories, category one is for target shooters and category two is for hunters. There is nothing worse for a hunter than to have a stock with a length of pull that is too long. When you wear heavy winter clothing it will catch on your clothing and restrict your ability to quickly aim and fire the rifle. Target shooters and people who shoot prone seem to like a longer length of pull because it puts the scope further away from the eye when shooting prone or leaning forward over a bench. In the past 13 1/2 inches was considered the standard length of pull but today many of the manufacturers are making rifles with a 14 inch length of pull. I think it is because more people are shooting prone with bipods. I have a 35 inch sleeve length but a 14 inch length of pull would drive me crazy!
 

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