Looking for recomendations for a target in mils to test scope tracking

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by dfanonymous, Jun 27, 2018.

  1. dfanonymous

    dfanonymous Well-Known Member

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    I know I can make my own, and im very familiar with the tall target test. However, I am looking for a target that is set up in mils to verify/test scope tracking....anyone have any suggestions?
     
  2. dfanonymous

    dfanonymous Well-Known Member

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    perfect. thank you!
     
  3. Crowe284

    Crowe284 Well-Known Member

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    You bet!
     
  4. Timber338

    Timber338 Well-Known Member

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    I’ve been through this drill and took a different approach. In order for this test to be accurate you need to have an accurate distance to the target. Within a few inches rather than +/-1 yard that a rangefinder gives you.

    I use a large reel tape measure and set a target at exactly 143ft 3in (47.75 yds) where 1 moa is exactly .5 inches. This lets me use yard stick as a target reference rather than an MOA scale.

    I have not done the math to see where 1 mil equals 1 inch or 1/2 an inch, but that shouldn’t be too hard to run the numbers.
     
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  5. dfanonymous

    dfanonymous Well-Known Member

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    youre right, these only work when the distance is exact. .1 mil will be about .36 and 1 mil will be 3.6 inches. However this target makes it easier to get a preliminary idea of scope tracking but mostly repeatability for me...call it a extra verification before doing my tall target. next will be taking the numbers if there's any deviation in repeatable tracking error to put into a solver. its part of my truing process. it works for me.
     
  6. Bravo 4

    Bravo 4 Well-Known Member

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    I do it similar, just at 100 yards. 10 mils (36' @ 100) or 34 MOA (35.6" @ 100) at a time, throughout the scope's adjustment travel. Check the scope before even mounting on rifle using a rail mounted on a block. Then if it checks out, re-check it on the rifle (shooting) to make sure things are lined up. Have sent scopes in for service before mounting, or do as dfanonymous stated, and insert a correction to the turrets adjustments into the ballistic app.
     
  7. Bravo 4

    Bravo 4 Well-Known Member

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    Somebody check my math on this:
    A mil is 1/1000 of whatever you are measuring. So if 1000 inches equals 27.7777778 yards, then 1 mil is 1" @ that range.
    The .7777778 yards equals 28.0000008"....
    so 27 yards + 28" for all practical purposes
     
  8. CjC73

    CjC73 Well-Known Member

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    depends if you are talking a mil or a mrad? have to be careful when talking mils, a mil (1/1000) can be a 0.001" or a mil being short for millimeter. I use millimeters in my job but we say mils.

    1mrad = 3.6" = 3.44 moa at 100 yards

    a mil scope measures mrad.
     
  9. Bravo 4

    Bravo 4 Well-Known Member

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    Guess you have a point there, been a shooter for many years and nobody has ever brought that up. Guess the difference between military/shooter lingo and something like machine work could confuse someone. However I’ve never heard anyone adjust a scope or give a correction in mm (what I thought was the standard abbreviation for millimeter, not mil). Centimeters (cm) scope adjustments yes, but not mm. Even then, when I see a scope adjustment in cm I just know it’s mil (milliradian) and don’t give it another thought. The abbreviation for milliradian or “mils” is a “m” with a right hash mark through it, to distinguish it from meters (kinda hard to do on a phone).
    We do however use mm in the characteristics of weapon systems, such as 7.62x51mm chamberings or 2 & 7mm peep sights. You say MRAD in some some circles and they will think a type of radar system. Guess in this case it’s assumed the person or audience would know the correct unit of measurement for the intended purpose.

    But did you at least check my math?:D
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2018
  10. dfanonymous

    dfanonymous Well-Known Member

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    a mil other places might be short for millimeter but a mil in the shooting community as far back in the military as i can remember has always been short for miliradian...which is also called mrad by some other people and manufactures. So as far as jargon is concerned...they are usually synonymous.


    however this, is unnecessarily complicated. When talking about inches yes. in the formula when doing a range est with mils, the easy way is to round off 27.77 to 27.78. As to figure out what the mill angle is at that distance...the rounded number is going to be a fraction difference. .027. So + .03 mils difference by rounding the .7777778 to any form of 28"
    This has no real functionality though unless you are just trying to figure out the scope adjustments when bzoing at a closer range. so 1.00003ish inches.
    27.78/1000
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2018
  11. oldfortyfiveauto

    oldfortyfiveauto Well-Known Member

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    With a new scope recently, I tried something different to check it out. I mounted it on an old steel bracket I use at our club for my spotting scope. It was rock solid. I was then able to put it on my target grid and using the turrets walk the crosshairs around. Doing this takes the gun and shooter out of the equation. This was with a lower end Athlon, but I was impressed with its repeatability as I walked the crosshairs around in a box pattern.
     
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  12. Bravo 4

    Bravo 4 Well-Known Member

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    Yep, and that's exactly what was happening. Wasn't using the mil-relation formula for range estimation on a distant target of known size, just finding the yardage where 1 Mil equals 1".

    Oldfortyfive,
    We are on the same page with checking the scope prior to mounting it on a rifle. The "rail mounted on a block" I mentioned earlier is simply a picatinny rail screwed down to a block of wood that is affixed to a sturdy bench that is concreted into the ground. It takes a bit of time to get everything lined up but works great for checking turret adjustments and for reticle canting and movement in the scope. Unfortunately even when finding an error, the manufacturers will allow a certain amount of discrepancy.