Long Range Hunting From Box Stand

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by Orange Dust, Nov 12, 2019.


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  1. Bravo 4

    Bravo 4 Well-Known Member

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  2. TangoOscarMike

    TangoOscarMike Well-Known Member

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    They see my equipment coming and just assume that its an ugly midget python and it puts them at ease. LMAO. How did this post go here? LMAO.
     
  3. Orange Dust

    Orange Dust Well-Known Member

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    It would. It is expensive. OD Green boat paint lasts for years, but seems hard to find lately. Everyone used to stock it, but supplies seem to have dried up. HAZMAT Fees I guess. One thing I did do on this one was to seal all of the end grain on the plywood with Flexseal spray. That's where most of the delamination starts, and just using it on the end grain is pretty cheap ($10). You can build one of these stands with roof sheathing and treated lumber for under $200, and it will last 10-15 years with just a coat of paint every 2-3 years. I['m 61 so I'm not very worried about it. Guess if I was younger I might spend more on protecting it.
     
  4. Orange Dust

    Orange Dust Well-Known Member

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    My dear departed father in law always locked his stands on our old lease. He went home a couple of times and returned to find the lock broken. Someone had been hunting his stand. He caught a couple of Diamondbacks and locked them up in his stands. When he came back, one of them had been broken into. Never found out who, but never had a problem again. He was a tough old coot. Miss him.
     
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  5. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    What liner are you using? Is it a roll on?

    I've seen some here in Texas that have Line Ex or something similar sold commercially and was fairly impressed. I was considering a couple of plywood blinds and using something similar on them so I find this interesting.
     
  6. Orange Dust

    Orange Dust Well-Known Member

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    Another plus for the bedloner stuff is its sound deadening properties, but it is expensive. Epoxy floor coating for concrete floors is another option, that is a little cheaper. I like the bedliner idea, but it will double the cost of the stand. Time will tell how well sealing the endgrain with flexseal spray will hold up with paint over it.
     
  7. Orange Dust

    Orange Dust Well-Known Member

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    The most important thing is to use pressure treated lumber. More expensive, but your stand will not last without it unless you use something like cypress.
     
  8. keithcandler

    keithcandler Well-Known Member

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    When you are thinking of building those shooting shooting supports, build in such a way so that your elbow is supported. If your elbow is unsupported, you are going to have one heck of a time being steady.
     
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  9. Orange Dust

    Orange Dust Well-Known Member

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    Yup. If you are going to shoot very far for sure.
     
  10. TangoOscarMike

    TangoOscarMike Well-Known Member

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    For your deer bling you can use whatever is cheapest. You have to remember that this stuff is made to withstand some pretty rough treatment. If you're just counting on it to repel rain and moisture and withstand someone walking around on it with rubber soled shoes its going to see a lot less wear than its intended purpose.

    It will add cost to your stand, but once you do it you will have a few things going for you.

    1. You won't have to use your time replacing it in the future.
    2. You won't have to worry about the animals having to become accustomed to something new in their environment year after year.
    3. You will have the peace of mind knowing that your stand will be comfortable, dry and in good condition every season.
     
  11. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    No argument from me for sure. I was considering the DuPont version which incorporates Kevlar fiber to give it even better strength and environmental resistance and it comes in many different colors so it would be easy to do a camo pattern and have it last probably longer than I will. It can also be rolled on which makes it extra attractive for me since I don't have a spray rig.
     
  12. TangoOscarMike

    TangoOscarMike Well-Known Member

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    I don't worry about camouflage with stuff like permanent blinds as the animals who are around them every day will get used to them no matter what color they are, but if you want to make them camo'd you can use regular paint over top of the truck bed liner too. The liner is just to make it weather proof. You can paint it whatever color you want once you're done.
     
  13. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    Around here deer get smart in a hurry. The more a blind blends into the background the better off we are. They even learn to recognize feeders and the heightened risk around them.

    It's very rare for a really old, big buck or doe to be killed from a box blind or at a feeder. Generally they will skirt them well out of rifle range.

    Last week I watched a couple of really big bucks on a friend's place they've been trying to kill for three years but have never gotten within a half mile of either of them hunting out of blinds.

    After a few hours of watching the old timers I gave the neighbors a lesson in how to get out of their blinds, use the terrain, wind, and cover to sneak up within rifle range of both of them.

    They both blew their shots but I had worked them both into within 420 yards of both. I'd bet that's the first time either of those old timers have ever been within rifle range for even an above average shooter.
     
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  14. TangoOscarMike

    TangoOscarMike Well-Known Member

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    I don't have any recent experience in heavy hunting pressure. Any time that I have set up a blind we kill a deer or two out of it every year and that's it. Some blinds don't get one deer killed out of them some years. Also, we kill mostly young deer. I'm a meat hunter. I don't care about antlers at all. The only set of antlers that matter to me are the ones that are big enough to legally fill my buck tag. Every year I get 12 tags, and every year I try to kill 12 deer. I fill up my freezers with vacuum sealed one pound blocks of ground meat, make a jillion gallons of bone broth, tan some hides, and I am done until next season LOL. So, my hunting is a lot easier than yours. I will let the young guys chase the big racks. I have killed big wide 10-12 pointers. I have killed huge mass bucks with matching drop tines. I've killed a pie bald 10 pointer. I have taken a lot of "trophies" and it just doesn't matter to me anymore. So, I stick to the young, stupid, tasty deer LOL.

    When we are making blinds for black bear we make them out of cedar trees and build them like lincoln log cabins. We take the cedar trees from the areas that we hunt. I believe that bears require a little more savvy to kill than deer, but maybe those old mature bucks are Einsteins too?