Light rifles, big cartridges, and scope mounts - learned my lesson, now it's time to pass it on.

Mike300wby

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Oct 16, 2016
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Thanks for the information.
If you check the alignment on a 2 ring set up and it is off, is there some type of adjustment that can be done to correct?
 

okie man

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Dec 21, 2013
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Ever wonder if waxing a scope to a high gloss finish right before mounting it has anything to do with some of these issues? I remember when a little rubber cement on your rings helped keep a scope from moving.
 

B-LOT Banga

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I’m very late to this but this is why on all my sights moving pcs, limb bolts, quiver mounts and cam settings I put a dap of nail polish when I finish sighting in all my bows. If it breaks something moved. Same as with my guns I put a dab of nail polish on both side of the rings where it meets the tubes and again where the base meets the rings. Kind of like how mechanics put marks on their bolt heads but since this is small screws that can stretch, break or twist I can’t rely on that, but if pcs or components physically move it will break the seal and let me know somethings wrong. Then I can narrow my problem down instead of guessing or tearing stuff apart.
 

phorwath

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Every riflescope in my arsenal is equipped with highly visible tape, butted up against the forward face of the rear scope ring.

Easy for my aging eyes to see any gap that begins showing between the tape and the forward face of that scope ring.

Lived..., and learned from it.
 

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LeddSlinger

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Griffin Armament and Audere are like Sphur but half the cost
Looks good and plenty tough but the material isn’t quite as good as Spuhr so that’s where they can save to make them cost less. The Griffin is 6061 and Spuhr uses stronger and more expensive 7075 aluminum. But for what most of us do I doubt the difference is in qualify of materials would matter much.
 

phorwath

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A big difference in the strength of 6061 versus 7075.
Easton made aluminum arrow shafts out of both types. Easy to bend a 6061 aluminum arrow shaft. Much more maleable than 7075. 7075 much stiffer and tougher. 7075 could split or crack open, where 6061 would almost always bend.

Because of those experiences, I always buy 7075 scope rails and rings, even though they're more expensive. Generally Seekins Precision.

Of course, arrow shafts are thin walled. So they really demonstrate the strength difference between the two types of aluminum. Thicker scope rails and scope rings... maybe 6061 is enough. But I don't risk it.
 
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LeddSlinger

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Thanks for the information.
If you check the alignment on a 2 ring set up and it is off, is there some type of adjustment that can be done to correct?
Lapping will cure misalignment and give the rings better contact surface area on the scope tube. But bedding the rings is the only way to get 100% contact on the scope tube along with perfect alignment
 

LeddSlinger

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I made a video for bedding scope rings but never published it on my channel because it was so long, like 40 minutes. It’s an easy process but I need to do another video and just hit on the key points to shorten it down a bit. In my original video I went into all the mathematical calculations on creating shims to insert in the bedding for elevation compensation. If you know how to rework the basic math formula to create 20 MOA based on the actual distance of your rings then you can bed the rings to create any specific amount of elevation compensation you desire. I will generally create shims for bedding in the rings that give perfect compensation where your scope adjustments are optically centered at 600 yards. Most people just use a 20 MOA base and that’s fine, but most rifles require a lot less compensation than that to be optically centered at 600.

you will have the best optical clarity when your scope adjustments are centered and the quality of the picture can slightly degrade the further you go from center. I feel 600 yards is a good distance to be centered because it gives excellent optical clarity when dialed down for close 100 yard shots or long 1,000 yard or longer shots.

I do not like scopes with 10x mag ranges and a lot of adjustment built in because they have poor optical quality on high power when the elevation is turned beyond 75%.
 
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SSG Graybush

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Aug 13, 2020
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Winchester VA
If you talk to Ryan Pierce of Piercision Rifles, he beds every scope in the rings, and he says the same thing, that the fit is tight enough that he can lift or nearly lift the rifle after lightly pressing the optic into the ring bases. It has nothing to do with needing lapping, there is no binding, lapping would be counter intuitive, a good bedding job gives 100% contact of the rings to the scope, not 95% or 98% like a really good lap job might do. And as far as what I did first, was exactly what you just said....I am switching from DNZ one piece base to a rail base and set of 4 rings. The base will be pinned with either 2 or 4 pins.
Sorry but a scope should sit down in the lower ring half without pressing it in there and not have any binding or tension enough to be able to pick the rifle up. You do your thing but imo your going way overboard. Your trying to reinvent the wheel when its already round. And again I would never bed a scope to the rings permanently. Thats just crazy. Scopes break, a lot! Oh well. Good luck.
 

codyadams

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Sorry but a scope should sit down in the lower ring half without pressing it in there and not have any binding or tension enough to be able to pick the rifle up. You do your thing but imo your going way overboard. Your trying to reinvent the wheel when its already round. And again I would never bed a scope to the rings permanently. Thats just crazy. Scopes break, a lot! Oh well. Good luck.
Sorry to say, but if your scopes are breaking a lot, your the one doing something wrong.....
 
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