Leaving a lot of the 22-250 on cutting room floor

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by jski, Apr 20, 2019.


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  1. KyCarl

    KyCarl Well-Known Member LRH Team Member

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    DSC00006 wheeler 22-250.JPG I'm not at all interested in parting it out! Action or complete rifle the price is the same! I would be tempted a lot more by good trades!
    A 280 AI of equal quality..Good glass..Gold/Silver ( spot day of trade)..Colt Snakes. .. 1911's..Nice Shotguns...What have you?
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2019
  2. pickens72

    pickens72 Well-Known Member

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    You will need a 7 twist to run 95s
     
  3. KENNETH R BRACKENBURY

    KENNETH R BRACKENBURY Active Member

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    The 1-9 twist will just take care of the 75 gr bullets unless you slow them down then 80 grain is tops. You will need a 1-7 to shoot 95 gr. bullets. My Douglas barrel is 1-8 and I don't like the slower velocities with 80 gr. A-Max bullets. I like the 1-9 twist with 75 gr. A-Max running 3650 fps. Shoot as far is needed................1151 PD kill in SD. 700-800 yds is its favorite.
     
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  4. KR260

    KR260 Member

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    I have a Tikka Varmint in 223 with the factory 1-8 barrel. Using AICS mags and H4895 I run the 75gr ELDM at 3025 fps and it is flatter than my 6.5 with 140 ELDM out to 800 yards.
    The rifle in my profile pic is a Tikka with a 1-7 Bartlein chambered in 22BR. I run the 88gr ELDM at 3004 fps with 27.3 gr of H4895. You can get 3050-3150 with Varget. If you keep it at 3050 or less, barrle life is 2500+. My next 223 barrel will be a 1-7 so I can play with the 80 and 88 ELDM. Might go 223AI.
     
  5. pickens72

    pickens72 Well-Known Member

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    I have had good luck with the 77tmk in a 9 twist 22/250 run them 3350. Shoots really well.
     
    KENNETH R BRACKENBURY likes this.
  6. 7Footer

    7Footer New Member

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    JSKI- I was in your exact shoes about 10 years ago. I started shooting at distance hunting prairie dogs for a rancher that considered PD hunting on his land a favor. I was shooting my .204 Ruger with 40 gr bullets and was doing better than my friends with their 22-250's shooting 45 gr bullets when the dogs were out past 400 yards. That was when I figured out the benefits of BC over speed.
    Around that time, I got a smokin deal on a used Savage 22-50 from a pawn shop that had the gun on the shelf too long. I picked it up on a whim because I couldn't pass up the deal and I was looking forward to a project gun. My original plan was to re-barrel the gun with another 22-250 because all indications (bluing worn off on the bolt handle, worn out checkering on the stock, etc) were that the barrel was probably shot out. Because I was looking at a new barrel anyway, I considered an 1:8 twist barrel with a 22-250 chamber but after a lot of research and some optimism based on ignorance, I decided to go with my first wildcat, and ordered a barrel from Shilen with their 22-243 chamber and 1:8 twist ratchet rifling, and have never looked back at the 22-250. Since I was not invested in dies or anything else in 22 caliber, I started from scratch with some Redding dies in 243 Win with a neck bushing die. I worked up some loads for the 80 gr A-Max bullets and had very good accuracy with decent velocity (3500 to 3550 fps using H4831sc) but I stayed away from the Berger 90's due to their recommended 1:7 twist. Last year, I decided to spend the money and get a box of those Berger 90s just to see how they might do, with the hope that they would stabilize with the slower 1:8 twist barrel thinking that the faster speed would produce a high enough rpm. I reduced my load and chrony'd that batch at 3420 fps with very good accuracy. One of the bullets blew up on its way to the steel, so I might back off the load a bit. I have also shot the 88 gr ELDM's with excellent results and about the same velocity as the Bergers.
    Long story, I know - and I'm not trying to steer anyone in any particular direction, but with the 80 gr ELDM's (Hornady stopped making the Amax's in 80gr) I was getting a G1 BC of .485 at 3500 fps and hitting my 12" steel plate at 1150 yards all day. With the 88 gr ELDMs I can shoot a G1 BC of .545 at 3400 fps.
    My shooting buddies with their 22-250's can't get the PD's that this gun will reach, and needless to say the results of an 80 gr bullet vs a PD are remarkable. At long ranges, the 22-250s are just knocking the PD's over, but the 22-243 is still launching them into orbit. One other benefit of building my gun was chosing a heavy barrel, adding an APA brake, and I made a heavy stock, making it a heavy beast, so I actually have less felt recoil than the other 22-250's and I get to watch all of my hits (and misses of course) through my scope, something the lighter rifles can't manage.
    Anyway - hope this story was helpful.
     
  7. jski

    jski Active Member

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    This is from:
    https://www.accurateshooter.com/cartridge-guides/22-250/

    .22-250 Recommended Twist Rates
    [​IMG]
    The .22-250 shoots a wide range of bullets very effectively, from 35gr flat-based varmint bullets, to ultra-long 90gr VLDs. However, you’ll need the right twist rate for your choice of bullet. For max velocity and accuracy with the lightest bullets, a 1:14″ twist may be ideal. More versatile is a 1:12″ twist that will allow you to shoot the popular 60-64 grain match bullets. For normal lead-core jacketed bullets, a true 1:9″ twist will let you shoot up to 75gr bullets (except some longer VLDs). The Hornady 75gr BTHP shoots very well in a 9-twist .22-250. Since most .22-250 Rem shooters prefer bullets in the 50-73gr range, a good “do-it-all” solution is a 9-twist.

    Overall, what twist rate is best? For all-around use, including 500-600 yard ground hog matches, we like a 9-twist. That will let you shoot some pretty-high-BC bullets at long range without “choking” the lighter bullets too much. If you don’t plan to shoot at long range, a 12-twist barrel will do the job. The slower twist will give you a bit more velocity, and minimize the risk of jacket failure at high rpms. That’s one reason why the majority of factory .22-250 rifles are sold with 1:12″ twist barrels. Savage does offer some 9-twist barrel options. That’s nice if you shoot in windy conditions and need to stabilize a longer bullet. If you plan to use your .22-250 for across the course (high power) competition, you’ll want to use the 77-80 grain boat-tail match bullets. For those, we suggest an 8-twist barrel (as long as it is a true 1:8″ twist). That will let you shoot the excellent 77gr and 80gr Sierra MatchKings, and 80gr Bergers.
     
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  8. KENNETH R BRACKENBURY

    KENNETH R BRACKENBURY Active Member

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    The 77 smk I used shot well but not as good as others in my custom Savage.