Knee pain options

Scott E Ames

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LRH Team Member
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Dec 25, 2012
Messages
305
Real doctor here. Free medical advise is worth what you pay for it! NOTHING. See a reputable orthopedic surgeon and get a real workup. Knee pain is a non-diagnostic symptom. Some of the suggestions here could be dangerous as none of the armchair doctors have any idea of your current medications or pre-existing medical problems.
You could try a neoprene knee support or compression sleeve but should really see a physician and get individualized treatment tailored for you.
 

Pulpwood

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Joined
Aug 7, 2016
Messages
415
Once you get a mri they can tell you exactly what’s wrong . My only two cents is my right knee started hunting some and swelling in my late 20 s , when I got 50 all of a sudden it hurt all the time and I walk a lot in my work . Finally had to go to the dr and had a mri done Surgery required to fix it Missed 3 days work over the weekend and it hasn’t hurt in 8-9 yrs. I regret not having it fixed earlier
 

DCAN

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Joined
Mar 14, 2011
Messages
124
Real doctor here. Free medical advise is worth what you pay for it! NOTHING. See a reputable orthopedic surgeon and get a real workup. Knee pain is a non-diagnostic symptom. Some of the suggestions here could be dangerous as none of the armchair doctors have any idea of your current medications or pre-existing medical problems.
You could try a neoprene knee support or compression sleeve but should really see a physician and get individualized treatment tailored for you.
As a veteran of 6 knee surgeries, LISTEN TO THE DOC!
 

brcfo_outdoors

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Joined
Mar 24, 2020
Messages
136
Location
Left Coast
I am 28 and have chronic knee pain as well, mostly clicking and popping going up or down stairs and just constant discomfort. Went years just dealing with flair ups and not being able to walk after doing certain activities (running down hill, especially on cement) and finally broke down and got an MRI. It didn't show anything, and my doctor referred me to a physical therapist. Basically what they determined is that I have fissures and scar tissue in the cartilage under my patella that is just never going to go away. Six months or so of PT with recommendations to use the stationary bike and do lunges, etc, never really helped. I was told I could manage the flair ups but we were essentially going to treat symptoms forever. Painkillers don't do anything and I was advised not to ice because it just slows the metabolic processes. What finally cured my pain (before COVID) was going to the gym and using the incline squat machine to get my quads nice and strong. Nothing else has come close in terms of effectiveness. My physical therapist would unload my knee cap using KT tape, and recommended I purchase this particular knee brace (which I have been too lazy to do) which essentially does the same thing:


Ultimate recommendation is see a physical therapist, and keep your quads strong. Typically and MRI is a necessary step in that process but I have had 3 that didn't show anything/what they were supposed to.
 

Tommytrees

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LRH Team Member
Joined
Jun 7, 2020
Messages
171
Location
FloridaGeorgiaLine
Geo - I read the above responses and want to tell you that all of our knees and the injuries received are not the same. We are similar. Get an opinion from at least 2 maybe 3 orthopedic specialists. Check their credentials and reputation. Get the MRI and other tests they have. Take the best care of them you can. I have a total knee replacement and after this co-vid stuff will be scheduled for the left knee replacement. I can still hunt. Sincerely, be well, be safe.
 

808caliber

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Joined
Aug 30, 2020
Messages
50
Location
Oahu
Not sure if mentioned above. But i highly suggest looking up kelly Starett on YT. he is one of the top PT for functional recovery and he has a ton of videos on how to diagnose problems within the functionality of joints and how to go about improving them. He also has a great book called the Supple Leopard to read as well.

I am a nurse and no offense to any MD's, but imo they just don't have the education on some of the fundamental principles with movement. If i have a torn ACL or labrum, then hell ya i want a great surgeon to fix it, but if its knee inflammation or tendinitis, i don't want a cortisone shot or medication. I want someone to help me diagnose the root cause and how to improve functionality through weight training and movements.
 
Joined
Jul 20, 2018
Messages
23
Location
Alaska
I'm no doctor, nor am I a physical therapist. But I have a B.S in Kinesiology and was a CSCS. I also have had my share of injuries and have spent loads of time in PT. As far as knee surgeries I have had surgery on both my patellar tendons, and I have partially torn meniscui in both knees. Without an MRI and a good doctor, there is no way to know what is really wrong with your knee, so it is hard to say what is best.

The general rule is to stay away from what causes pain, and do what doesn't cause pain, ice after exercise and warm up properly before exercise. Proper strength training and stretching can also be beneficial as it improves your muscles ability to support the knee and keeps tight muscles from pulling on joints wrong causing bad form. Don't just focus on your legs also stretch and strengthen your core as everything your legs do is performed off the stability of the core. Usually high impact activity should be avoided, so should exercises like lunges, leg curls, leg extensions, and bulgarian squat. Down hill anything with weight will usually cause knee pain. Generally sticking step ups, squats and hex bar deadlifts is safe (WITH PROPER FORM). Also cycling is often a good option for cardiovascular training, but depending on what is wrong can be worse. Other then the above suggestions, if what your are doing isn't causing you problems I would switch to something that might (if it's not broke...) Also make sure you take some time off before your hunt to let your body properly recoup and you should try to get to elevation a few days before your hunt as it will allow for acute acclimatization.

This is all very general and without a professional being able to actually figure out what's wrong, a lot of suggestions can do more harm than good (even suggestions coming from a professional who has misdiagnosed the problem) so listen to your body.
 

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