JP weld for bedding

Takem406

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Oct 20, 2013
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West Central Montana
I've got a few bedding project. I was about to Acraglas but saw people using JB weld that's supposed to be stronger. Never bedded a stock before so I'm trying to figure out how to go. Would the kits be a good way to go? I have about three rifles to work on. Thanks boys!
 

Dosh

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Aug 6, 2013
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Arizona
406, JB Weld is used to bed along with Marine-Tex and Devcon. Devcon is the priciest of the three followed by Marine-Tex and JB. There are lots of You-Tube videos and articles here on the forum for bedding tips. What rifles will you bed?
 

rpatowers

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Dec 8, 2010
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Hayward, CA
Shrinkage is the most important issue when it comes to bedding compound. I've read that Devcon shrinks the least of all the popular bedding compounds. I've ben using Devcon for 25+ years and have never been disappointed.
 

Dgd6mm

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I used Marine Tex Grey for my first two bedding jobs that came out great. Since then I have bedded actions with nothing but Devcon Steel Putty 10110, nothing but good results every time. In S. Fl. the Marine Tex kicks pretty fast if you are not in a climate controlled environment, where Devcon gives you more time to work it. I still shoot my .300 RUM tgat was my first bedding job, looks like new. My Devcon bedding jobs look the same. Either one will do the job, can not comment on shrinkage.
 

jsthntn247

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Whichever you decide to use try and weigh the hardner and putty out separate per the instructions. I get allot better results doing it this way than guestimating volume by looks. I've used Devcon, Jb, and Marine Tex. I prefer Marine Tex b/c I can get it locally.
 

rpatowers

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Some years back McMillan told me that they use Marine tex. They sill may use it, I don't know, but if Marine Tex is used by McMillan it must be good. I've used it once with good results, but I've used Devcon Steel Putty for all other bedding jobs over the last 30 years.

Years ago I used to use Devcon F-1 Aluminum Putty for the first "coat", and then followed up with Devcon Aluminum liquid for a "brush-on" coat. That worked well but I heard that the Devcon steel putty had such a low shrinkage rate that two coats aren't needed. I agree with the person above who wrote that it is best to weigh the resin and the hardener separate to get the correct ration of the two.

I use Devcon for bedding the action. For gluing the pillars into the stock, I use Tap Plastics 4 to 1 epoxy mixed with tiny glass fibers. In my opinion, pillars require an epoxy with tensile strength, and I think that the 4 to 1 epoxy mixed with glass fibers has more tensile strength than Devcon (Devcon has more crush strength). I can not substantiate this, however, but I have never had pillars come lose, even for big-caliber cartridges such as the 300 and 338 RUMs.
 

Hired Gun

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Marine Tex has the highest compressive strength of all available bedding materials except for Devcon Titanium. The titanium formulation is really hard to work with and is stupid expensive. I use Marine Tex exclusively except by special request.
 

Edd

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Jan 26, 2011
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McMillan told me there were several good bedding compounds. They said the main reason they used Marine Tex was because it was the easiest one to get in large quantities.
 

Hired Gun

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North Bend, Oregon
Readily available helps but if it wasn't the best thing they have found they wouldn't use it. It possesses properties that make it superior to most other compounds. There is no shortage of any Devcon products. I bet you could get a semi truck load of it for the asking and in the quantities they use it I doubt they pay retail. More likely half that cost or less.

On a $600 to $900 stock the cost of bedding material is so small it adds very little to the cost of stock. Fiberglass components are not cheap either. A $90 can of titanium will do 10 stocks or more and they just add it in the cost of the stock.

Of what goes into a McMillan stock the profit margin is the highest cost component. I bet it represents from 1/2 to 2/3'rds the cost.
 

engineer40

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May 5, 2015
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Rockford, MI
Shrinkage is the most important issue when it comes to bedding compound. I've read that Devcon shrinks the least of all the popular bedding compounds. I've ben using Devcon for 25+ years and have never been disappointed.

I recently used JB Weld and it turned out really good. I actually saw my groups shrink by about 1/4 inch at 100 yards.

Is shrinkage something I'll need to worry about later on with JB Weld or is that something i would have noticed right away?

Thanks!
 

engineer40

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May 5, 2015
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Rockford, MI
Whichever you decide to use try and weigh the hardner and putty out separate per the instructions. I get allot better results doing it this way than guestimating volume by looks. I've used Devcon, Jb, and Marine Tex. I prefer Marine Tex b/c I can get it locally.

This is interesting to me...

When you say "a lot better results", what specifically is your results measuring criteria?

I'm just still learning. :)
 
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