Jim Shockey gen. 3 tripod pros verse cons

Jnm300ultra

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Jan 31, 2015
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Im thinking about buying one buy was wondering what the weight of his tripod is. Looked at the website nothing came up. Hopping someone on this forum could weigh it for me. I had a bog pod and it seems to be slow to set up. I think this one will be much quicker and easier to set up. Any input would help since it’s $160. For a tripod.
Jason
 

DrillDog

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NightForce is coming out with a new tripod where you can remove the legs to use as dual walking sticks or use one as a monopod.

I use a Manfrotto Carbon Fiber tripod. Light, but very strong. There are gun cradle rests you can buy on ebay for really cheap that will adapt to any tripod quick detach plate with 1/4-20 threads so you don't need to limit yourself on choices to only "shooting pods". Just get any tripod you want and buy an extra quick detach plate for the gun rest. Use the other for a spotter or binoculars.

Here's a link to one:
https://m.ebay.com/itm/Tourbon-Rifl...736288413?epid=2255052379&hash=item3ad841b69d

Doesn't take me long at all to deploy my tripod because when I'm hunting, I usually leave all 3 legs extended (but not spread out) and use it as a walking stick. All I have to do is spread the legs, adjust the center post height (if needed) and I'm ready to rock. My CF Manfrotto has been beat to death and ran through hell in the high country over the years and it still works perfectly. Get what you pay for I guess ;)

As far as Jim Shockley goes, that jacka** will put his name on anything for a dime. Just because he endorses it doesn't mean it's good quality. Most of the junk he puts his name on is made in China...
 
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kiwikid

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Trying to find accurate info on the Primos trigger sticks is very hard work. Before I bought mine I wanted to know what length it was folded so I could work out if it would fit in my day pack but no one has that measurement listed. They only list the height with legs retracted and open or extended and open. Anyway I have the Gen 2 short tripod and it weighs 1065 grams or 37.5 oz. For shooting rabbits and hares out to about 250 m/y I have found it good but I wouldn't try shooting a deer off it at 500 m/y, it just isn't stable enough for that IMO. It is very quick to use and I have had it for a couple of years now and it is holding up well. One thing I would like is some form of closed cell foam around the legs, if you carry it with one hand around the legs those bare steel legs are very cold in the winter.
As DrillDog has said a good carbon fiber tripod would be better and it is a case of you get what you pay for.
 

CMP70306

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I have one just for general purpose hunting mainly for keeping my rifle at ready while on stand so I don’t have to get my gun up off my lap when the deer show up. It isn’t the most stable platform but it is quick to adjust and is better than offhand. I use mine as a walking stick through the woods and it only takes a couple seconds to undo the leg strap, push them apart then use the trigger to set the height right.

Now I wouldn’t reccomend it for heavy guns, it didn’t have any issue with my Model 70 but it didn’t like to support my 20lb target rifle.
 

snookntarpon

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Very Heavy. I have a set. Love the trigger. I will use it in a blind for a young hunter as a secondary rest. But too heavy if you are walking at all.

Have a manfrotto, but have reverted to the ones made by javelin bipods. lighter than any and much more versatile. Use it as a bipod or tripod or use walking sticks. Not more money than the manfrotto with a good head. just far better.

I have 2 generations and can swith parts from one to another as i please. They are so far beyond any other tripod that you cannot compare.

SnT
 

kai

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Nov 27, 2016
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I've bought several trigger stick tripods and bipods. They are fast and quick to adjust. That's the best feature.
Unfortunately, they rust internally if they get wet. Then they either freeze up with rust or won't stay up. I've had a couple of them replaced. The customer service person told me to not get them wet and if I do to take off the yoke and try to drain the water. The problem is that after they get wet the first hunting season, the next season mine have not worked and the 1 year warranty has expired. It's a good idea, but they rust and go bad on a regular basis for me.
 
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Barrelnut

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Same issues as KIA above. They suck in rain and internals rust quickly. This is all because the manufacturer uses a small steel teardrop cam inside the leg tubes that is by no means rust resistant and rain just flows in freely to when the cam is. Pretty stupid design. They are pretty nice, if you NEVER hunt in rain! But I think plain shooting sticks are lighter and quicker to deploy.
 

Jnm300ultra

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Jan 31, 2015
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Thanks for all the good advise, still wounding if I want to use my Manfrotto with a pig saddle on top of tripod. I’m just wondering about the weight of this setup. The pig saddle weighs 1.4 pounds and my tripod I’m sure is probably 4 pounds. I hunt on a lot of hillsides and it’s a pain trying to set up the tripod, was hoping that the trigger sticks would be easier and quick. Hearing that it rusts and jams sucks but I hunt in Northern California in August- September so we pray for rain. The extra weight for the tripod is water I care in my pack. Thanks for all the comments still thinking about what I will do.
Jason
 

geo4061

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Jason I have both and when stalking I usually grab the Primos. It is lighter, easier to use as a walking stick, much quicker deployment, and with practice can be done one handed. Advantage Primos on the hillsides if you are moving around and need quick deployment. The one problem I see is perhaps getting the right feet for either unit that will not slip. It is a shame about the rust problem but like you we are usually begging for rain.
 

WildRose

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Im thinking about buying one buy was wondering what the weight of his tripod is. Looked at the website nothing came up. Hopping someone on this forum could weigh it for me. I had a bog pod and it seems to be slow to set up. I think this one will be much quicker and easier to set up. Any input would help since it’s $160. For a tripod.
Jason
I have these in bipod and tripod form in 3 different sizes for standing, kneeling, prone positions depending on the cover I'm in.

I have been extremely happy with them even though they definitely do come at a price.
 

geo4061

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Primos tripod three pounds. If you are shooting from a stand or long distances the pig saddle is a good choice.
 
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Chino Tom

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May 3, 2014
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I have the short Ver 3 with the removable yoke. Also have the optics pad. I bought
a ball mount for the optics pad to mount my spotting scope. Very handy to be
able to carry only one stick/tripod.
 

DrillDog

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Very Heavy. I have a set. Love the trigger. I will use it in a blind for a young hunter as a secondary rest. But too heavy if you are walking at all.

Have a manfrotto, but have reverted to the ones made by javelin bipods. lighter than any and much more versatile. Use it as a bipod or tripod or use walking sticks. Not more money than the manfrotto with a good head. just far better.

I have 2 generations and can swith parts from one to another as i please. They are so far beyond any other tripod that you cannot compare.

SnT
The Javelin costs WAY more than Manfrotto CF tripods. Over twice the price as a matter of fact. The Javelin Mountain tripod is way too long retracted and not long enough extended. The woodland is ridiculously long retracted and folded, and about the right height extended.

The Javelin is a very nice tripod no doubt, but they haven't quite nailed it for backpack hunting in the mountains yet. 28" folded length is just way too long for a backpack and 47" is no good for using a spotting scope while standing unless a person is really short.


The link below is the Manfrotto CF I use. 20" folded length and 63" extended. Perfect for sitting or standing and anything in between. Has a 15.4 lb capacity (head handles 20 lbs) to handle my big Swarovski ATX 95mm spotter. 3.6 lbs is a little heavy for hiking, but you gotta have a sturdy platform when spotting with big glass. Center column also pivots out at a 90 degree angle if I want to get really low and glass from the prone position.

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/prod...06I5zgPl2B5chKAfaUzezyetcBoC4k4QAvD_BwE&smp=y
 

kiwikid

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Oct 21, 2012
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New Zealand
My short version of the Primos trigger stick tripod measures 29" when fully retracted ready to go into my pack and it is far too long. I have to use the rifle sling at the bottom of my pack and them strap it to the rear top of the pack.

Manfrotto make very nice gear, I have the aluminum version of what DrillDog has for my DSLR gear and it is rock solid.

For my Swarovski ATX spotter I use the Swarovski CT Traveler carbon fiber tripod. It was a lot cheaper here in NZ than the Manfrotto that DrillDog mentioned. It measures 19.7" without the head and weighs a fraction over 3 lbs. I see that they are bringing out new tripods which should be available very soon.

I am very tempted to buy the 9" Javelin bipod to fit to the front of one of my rifles. They aren't cheap but they are light and the quick magnetic release is very nice.
 

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