Is Pillar Bedding over rated ?

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by Iron Worker, Jan 4, 2014.

  1. Iron Worker

    Iron Worker Well-Known Member

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    Had a couple of competent Gun smiths say Pillar bedding is over rated ? What purpose is Pillar bedding trying to improve on ? One bedded all the sniper swat rifles for local police and and has earned a stellar reputation as a gun smith .
     
  2. Edd

    Edd Well-Known Member

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  3. Iron Worker

    Iron Worker Well-Known Member

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    Very interesting thanks.
     
  4. Edd

    Edd Well-Known Member

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    I just bought a new Brown Precision stock. This is their position on the subject.


    There's a lot of controversy in this industry about how, or even if, you need to bed a rifle's action to a stock to make it perform.
    After building thousands of custom benchrest and hunting rifles, performing exhaustive range and field testing and experimenting with virtually every one of the bedding "theories" out there over the past twenty-five years, we have concluded that mating the action to the stock is the only way to achieve absolute top accuracy and consistency from a rifle. Period.
    And because Brown Precision stocks are constructed with solid epoxy in the action area for strength and rigidity, only simple glass bedding around the action is required to achieve maximum performance - no pillars or permanent glue-ins.
     
  5. Lefty7mmstw

    Lefty7mmstw Well-Known Member

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    I've only pillar bedded one stock... my 7stw... the wood was compressing and allowing the guard screws to come loose. a pillar bed job stopped that cold. I then epoxy bedded the recoil lug to tighten that relationship up. Much more stable rifle now. I'd rather do nothnig if you don't need to though. My 300rum has the same wood stock as my stw and it hasn't been touched; 1/2 moa capable rifle anyway.
     
  6. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    Pillars by them selves Is only half of the process just like bedding without pillars is only half done IMO.

    Bedding by it's self can produce very good results. The problem is, with hard service accuracy can slowly go away if the stock will compress at all. (The only one that I know of that will not compress
    is an all aluminum stock.

    So, IMO if you want long life out of your bedding you need to Pillar bed it. But if it is not done right
    you have wasted you time. (It should be Metal to metal to metal contact)

    Torque values will change over time without pillars and POI and accuracy can and does change.

    There are a lot of very accurate rifles out there that are not bedded at all. But in time and with use
    all this changes because the stock is compressing and no longer holding the action the same way.

    In my opinion it is only overrated If someone doesn't want to take the time and effort to complete the job.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  7. 65WSM

    65WSM Well-Known Member

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    Aluminum has a higher temperature expansion or contraction property than almost any material you will see associated with firearms. They are in use because they are cheap and easily modified to fit. Milke Palazzo beds with titanium tubing around the guard screws. I like to make my own pillars in the stock with graphite fibers rolled around bedding pilot screws and non-shrink expoxy resin. I don't fool with the guard screws until the bottom of the action is bedded and cured.