In between 7mm-08 & .308

Northkill

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Not really going to help the recoil sensitivity...though recoil is so subjective to a host of factors. Unless I missed something, the OP'er hasn't posted more than once since his OP. No use wasting our time on this thread if he's not serious about his question/problem. We haven't received responses to important questions asked by various posters regarding relevant factors of consideration in order to give pertinent counsel. Why play the game?
 

ducky

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Agreed... I too suggested the 30-125 BT's in 308 for whitetail. ..But, I wouldn't bring that for elk.
Low recoil for youth and whitetail... we covered that over and over again. Elk...Well, you have to get him shooting heavier bullets or wait till he can... Or as others have said (not me), the great coppers should do it.
Don't bring a badminton racquet to to a tennis match!!
I guess I'm the opposite, I'd absolutely let my daughter kill an elk with the 125 gr NBT. I've hunted enough with her the last 11 years to now trust her. With the amount of whitetail, mule deer, and pronghorn she has piled up in 11 years of hunting with the Nosler 125, it'll do the job quite well even on elk out of a .308.

Like I stated, I trust my daughter. She isn't going to push the range, she has no desire to. She also is a good shooter and patient, she'll wait for the right opportunity or pass. When the right shot presents itself, she'll put the bullet where it needs to be.

The 125 NBT is one tough little bullet IME with it. No we wouldn't trust it to bust down an elk from any angle. However broadside or quartering away inside of 400 yards it'll do the job on any elk. You just have to make peace with not killing an elk if you don't get the right opportunity.

I'm not going to say a 125 NBT is the best choice for elk. However, if a kid shot them well I wouldn't deny them an elk hunt. We'd just work harder to make the right conditions happen so they could squeeze that trigger.
 

VLD Pilot

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I understand where you're coming from. I don't particularly like wearing hearing protection while hunting. But after suffering significant hearing loss I'm a huge advocate of them. And since I hunt alone I'm now considering a muzzle brake on some rifles.
I understand where you're coming from. I don't particularly like wearing hearing protection while hunting. But after suffering significant hearing loss I'm a huge advocate of them. And since I hunt alone I'm now considering a muzzle brake on some rifles.
I too suffer from hearing loss. In fact, I qualify for an aide in my left ear. Right ear is better but still not great. Still I certainly wear ear protection while shooting on the range. If I did use a brake for hunting, I'd wear protection, just not that crazy about it.
 

VLD Pilot

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Hell if your going down in caliber, any 6.5 would be a big drop in recoil. 6.5CM, .260, 6.5-284 and realistically, the 6.5 Grendel would be a great deer gun. Running 120-130 grain bullets in any of these cartridges would help in that reduction also.
 

Roughrice

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I guess I'm the opposite, I'd absolutely let my daughter kill an elk with the 125 gr NBT. I've hunted enough with her the last 11 years to now trust her. With the amount of whitetail, mule deer, and pronghorn she has piled up in 11 years of hunting with the Nosler 125, it'll do the job quite well even on elk out of a .308.

Like I stated, I trust my daughter. She isn't going to push the range, she has no desire to. She also is a good shooter and patient, she'll wait for the right opportunity or pass. When the right shot presents itself, she'll put the bullet where it needs to be.

The 125 NBT is one tough little bullet IME with it. No we wouldn't trust it to bust down an elk from any angle. However broadside or quartering away inside of 400 yards it'll do the job on any elk. You just have to make peace with not killing an elk if you don't get the right opportunity.

I'm not going to say a 125 NBT is the best choice for elk. However, if a kid shot them well I wouldn't deny them an elk hunt. We'd just work harder to make the right conditions happen so they could squeeze that trigger.
Yep... you are spot on with what I meant to say in previous threads.
I never meant to say the 125 BT can't get the job done. I meant that with good shot placement, it can be done.
My point was meaning to be that if someone is recoil sensitive...they may not be a good shot and not be able to make an ethical kill shot at extended range when the time comes. That's why I suggested heavier bullets that may dig deeper and put the elk down quicker.
Anyhow... We don't know each others shooting capabilities and make suggestions according to what we are thinking...not knowing.
I have seen plenty of bad shots put on deer from hunters who flinch and jerk triggers for some reason or the other. Most of those should have spent more time at the range. LOL
Don't know if you read it but I posted earlier that I keep some 308 rounds loaded with 125 BT for hunting.

Great day to all of you!
 

VLD Pilot

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Yep... you are spot on with what I meant to say in previous threads.
I never meant to say the 125 BT can't get the job done. I meant that with good shot placement, it can be done.
My point was meaning to be that if someone is recoil sensitive...they may not be a good shot and not be able to make an ethical kill shot at extended range when the time comes. That's why I suggested heavier bullets that may dig deeper and put the elk down quicker.
Anyhow... We don't know each others shooting capabilities and make suggestions according to what we are thinking...not knowing.
I have seen plenty of bad shots put on deer from hunters who flinch and jerk triggers for some reason or the other. Most of those should have spent more time at the range. LOL
Don't know if you read it but I posted earlier that I keep some 308 rounds loaded with 125 BT for hunting.

Great day to all of you!
Every bullet/ cartridge combo has its limitations. While shot placement is King, bullet weight and velocity needs to be considered when used on heavier game. I'm sure most know this but I'm also sure many do not consider it as often as they should. I've seen alot of Elk killed at distance with the 130s from a .270 Win.
 

Roughrice

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Every bullet/ cartridge combo has its limitations. While shot placement is King, bullet weight and velocity needs to be considered when used on heavier game. I'm sure most know this but I'm also sure many do not consider it as often as they should. I've seen alot of Elk killed at distance with the 130s from a .270 Win.
I agree. Shot placement.
I shoot a lot. I am a farmer and fortunate to have my own range setup.
I have a few people come over to sight in before hunting season and hand me the rifle and say "here, can you sight this in?".
I've done so on paper and while handing it back ask them to shoot the 100 (4" steel) and 200 (6" steel) plates.
I am sometimes surprised how much some struggle to hit the plates.
Then... weeks later they bring the rifle back and ask to check the zero because they missed deer at the feeder.
Guess what... smack, dead center. I then suggest buckshot!🤣
Happened twice last year.
You can only help so much.
Maybe take up fishing! LoL

Just a rant! I'm done!
 

cabelasken

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I realize recoil is a factor in bringing up a young shooter to be proficient on the range and in the field. I know several acquaintances that can repeatedly put up 1/2 to 3/4 MOA groups with some heavy kickers at the range but are challenged to put down a standing deer or an elk at 200 yds. I also know that practice helps correct some of these issues and i find the challenge to make good handloads with good game bullets and then get to use them in the field is part of the fun leading up to the hunt. The difference in recoil of a 7-08 and 308 win when set up with equal weight rigs is not a lot. I would bet that I would not be able to tell the difference in recoil between a 140 gr 7-08 and a 150 gr 308. My suggestion would be regardless of the caliber, start off with a light bullet for caliber, with a light but safe powder charge and then work up. Keep shot count low per range session like 10-12 shots max. And use one of the bullets designed to expand on game at a reduced velocity. There are many excellet ones available in .284 caliber and .308.
 

VLD Pilot

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I agree. Shot placement.
I shoot a lot. I am a farmer and fortunate to have my own range setup.
I have a few people come over to sight in before hunting season and hand me the rifle and say "here, can you sight this in?".
I've done so on paper and while handing it back ask them to shoot the 100 (4" steel) and 200 (6" steel) plates.
I am sometimes surprised how much some struggle to hit the plates.
Then... weeks later they bring the rifle back and ask to check the zero because they missed deer at the feeder.
Guess what... smack, dead center. I then suggest buckshot!🤣
Happened twice last year.
You can only help so much.
Maybe take up fishing! LoL

Just a rant! I'm done!
If you want to get someone driven to shoot better, just show them how the gun shoots that you sighted in and let them shoot it (poorly). I zeroed a buddy's 350 Legend in a few weeks ago. It shot .75 MOA for me out to 250 yards. When he shot it, he shot it high and left but about 3-4 MOA. I kept telling him he's picking his head up off the scope immediately after he pulls the trigger. He was so mad that he couldn't group that he just wanted to sell it. He doesn't shoot much but he called me a week later asking if we could go back out so he could shoot some more. Time behind the rifle you hunt with is actually the most important thing. It's what ables perfect shot placement. No substitutes.
 

Roughrice

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Yes. I abbreviated the story as not to get too long.
I enjoy the sport of shooting and I do help the guys who want to be helped. These couple of guys don’t want to spend the time shooting but love hunting. Go figure.
I have had young boys and girls who have come with their parents and have greatly improved their ability to shoot. A few can hit 2MOA at 300 and 400 yards.
One 8 yo boy can shoot 600 and has shot his dads 308 with 168 grain for his dads final relay at a F Class meet.
You are right... when someone wants to improve they usually do.

If you want to get someone driven to shoot better, just show them how the gun shoots that you sighted in and let them shoot it (poorly). I zeroed a buddy's 350 Legend in a few weeks ago. It shot .75 MOA for me out to 250 yards. When he shot it, he shot it high and left but about 3-4 MOA. I kept telling him he's picking his head up off the scope immediately after he pulls the trigger. He was so mad that he couldn't group that he just wanted to sell it. He doesn't shoot much but he called me a week later asking if we could go back out so he could shoot some more. Time behind the rifle you hunt with is actually the most important thing. It's what ables perfect shot placement. No substitutes.
 
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