I would like suggestion on what to look for when buying a backpack with rifle scabbard???

Discussion in 'Backpack Hunting' started by ODAVID, Oct 2, 2017.

  1. ODAVID

    ODAVID Well-Known Member

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    I have a heavy rifle; scope and rifle total in at 10lbs. I would like to buy a daytype backpack with rifle scabbard built in to transport to shooting area approx. 1-5 miles. I am new to this and would like helpful suggestions. Helpful suggestion are welcome.

    THANKS IN ADVANCE ODAVID
     
  2. ODAVID

    ODAVID Well-Known Member

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    I did come across this video.
    Maybe suggestions could also be based on his thinking.
    THANKS AGAIN
    ODAVID
     
  3. NoFences

    NoFences Well-Known Member

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    Lancer makes one for @ 100.00. Eberlestock starts @ 300.00. There are several others but these seem to be the ones I see the most. I don't think the Lancer is the quality of the Eberle. I heard several people complain about the weight of the Eberlestocks. I don't notice the weight , but I train with a weighted vest. Hopefully, others will jump in with reviews
     
  4. ODAVID

    ODAVID Well-Known Member

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    I could also adapt my current daypack to function like this.
     
  5. spfarr

    spfarr Well-Known Member

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    fwiw, I have Kuiu (Ultra 6000, Icon 3200 and 185 packs), Outdoorsmans (Optics and Long Range packs), and Eberlestock (J107M) packs. My hunting style is public land spot-and-stalk, so I always have to be prepared to pack my animal out myself, usually solo.

    In my experience, the Eberlestock provides the best carrying system I've used, by far. Gun is well-protected, and yet I can access the rifle quickly and easily - but I virtually never need to do that in my spot-and-stalk public land hunting.
    (The J107M has a wider scabbard than regular J107, and Cordura front panel, so heavier.) Scabbard accommodates large scopes, with tactical knobs.
    I've carried a number of animals (including smaller deer and pronghorn, whole, after field dressing) in/on the Eberlestock.
    I also like the fact that you can still carry your rifle safely/easily in the Eberlestock even if you have meat in the pack or an animal strapped onto the frame.
    The scabbard also works great for carrying a tripod and spotting scope if you're a spotter instead of the shooter.
    However, for overnight or multiday backpack hunting, I no longer use my Eberlestock, because it is quite a bit heavier (almost 10 lbs. empty for the J107M), than my other packs (4-7 lbs.) and it has less room and weight-carrying capacity than my other packs. The frame is relatively short, which is ok for me, because i'm short (5'7"), but I expect the frame might be quite short for taller folks (thereby lessening the effectiveness of the shoulder stabilizer straps and the ability to shift weight. note that that is presumably why Mystery Ranch sells their load extenders for their frames.)

    The Outdoorsmans system works well so far, based on limited usage. I'll be using the Outdoorsmans on a desert sheep in the next few weeks, and that will provide a better testing ground. Also, the Outdoorsmans' frame posts let you hang your rifle via the sling on the frame while hiking, which I have always found to be quite handy and comfortable. (Same as with using a Cabela's Alaskan outfitter pack frame without the top cross bar.)

    The Kuiu rifle carrying system works relatively well, in my experience thus far. However, my buttstock barely fits in the carrier, and I do not have an unusually large buttstock on my rifle. And I personally can't get the rifle off the pack without taking the pack off - can't reach the release buckle and hard to extricate the buttstock from bottom carrier while wearing the pack.
    And for me, I have to carry the rifle with the scope away from me (so my elbow doesn't hit the scope), and I have worried about the scope bearing the brunt of any impact if I ever fell/slipped on that (right) side. (I used the pack and rifle carrier in the Brooks Range, without mishap).

    I have not used the Mystery Ranch carrying system.

    good luck with your search.
     
  6. 7magcreedmoor

    7magcreedmoor Well-Known Member

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    I've been using an Eberlestock J107 for several years, and am very satisfied with the design. No it isn't an ultralight pack, but it is built to last. They do make smaller pack models if you don't intend hauling meat out in it, but still want the rifle scabbard.
     
  7. ODAVID

    ODAVID Well-Known Member

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    THANKS TO ALL FOR sharing your experiences. I can see there is much to sort through in this search. It is good to have options but options can be overwhelming to the inexperienced individuals. So please keep sharing your experiences.

    Perhaps I should offer some more of my plans to help narrow down the search.
    I also hunt lots of private land on a day hunt bases. Meaning I search for a hunting place by scouting weeks in advance then hunt the place by hiking in that morning and hiking out that evening. I also need the ability to carry the meat and horns out. Previously I have carried out the horns and prime cuts of meat after the harvest is made. Then return to the downed game either later that day or the next morning with a different pack to carry out the last bit of meat and hide.

    I can see it might be best to have one pack for actual hunting day and another pack for carrying out the meat. Do many of you hunt this way???

    I feel it would be nice to have one pack do it all but I am not rich by any means, nor am I really that muscular to carry a heavy pack full of meat and rifle. I feel I am like several other hunters. So keep sharing your suggestions.

    THANKS AGAIN in advance.
    ODAVID
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2017
  8. pikeman

    pikeman Well-Known Member

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    I choose to get the badlands 2200 pack to carry my 12 lb 7mm. Seems well made but have only taken small hikes with it so far with no rifle in it as I live in city limits and don't want to freak people out.
     
  9. 7magcreedmoor

    7magcreedmoor Well-Known Member

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    My pack with an elk front quarter and my rifle and other gear... 105_0897.JPG
     
  10. spfarr

    spfarr Well-Known Member

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    +1 for 7magcreedmoor's comments, including the durability of Eberlestock.

    fyi - I just got an email from Eberlestock regarding their new J117 Dragonfly pack - lighter weight fabric, but same (and perhaps new/better) features.

    fwiw - if you also want to have a meat-hauling packframe, the Outdoorsmans pack detaches from the frame and there is a load carrier on the frame itself.

    good luck.
     
  11. ODAVID

    ODAVID Well-Known Member

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    Keep the suggestions coming guys. I am starting to narrow don the possibilities.......

    7magcreedmoor I have questions for you.
    I noticed you carry with butt stock up. Do it hit against you head or hat as you hike???
    Are you able to remove your rifle without taking the pack off????
    Can you get a larger scope inside the scabbard???
    Are you able to get bipods also in with rifle???
    I feel a front shoulder of elk is what I also have in mind of carrying out.. I am also thinking of using my larger pack as a work horse in carrying out more meat if I can work up to that. Is that what you do???

    THanks
    oDAVID
     
  12. 7magcreedmoor

    7magcreedmoor Well-Known Member

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    Pulling the rifle is very quick and easy, no it doesn't hit me in the head. I usually don't have the bipod on in the scabbard but it does fit if I want to have it on all the time. I can pull the rifle and shoot offhand while wearing the pack in about 4 seconds if time presses. The pack makes a decent rest from prone or sitting, and if I put my trekking poles up front and the pack standing under the butt it works every time at 700 yards.
     
  13. Plinker147

    Plinker147 Well-Known Member

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    The packs that the gun sits in the middle of your back are the most comfortable for long hikes. I have an eberle X1A1 where the gun sits of to one side. Its fine with my lighter guns but when I care my 12lbs + guns it begins to be uncomfortable.

    The Gun runner, dragon fly, and just one all sit in the middle I believe. All the other eberle's sit of to one side.

    I don't have experience with other packs but any pack that holds the gun off center will probably get uncomfortable on a long hike
     
  14. 7magcreedmoor

    7magcreedmoor Well-Known Member

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    The off center issue isn't as bad as you might think, since the 3 liter water bladder is on the opposite side. I also locate the other bits of kit with the goal of balancing the load as equally as possible. The rifle in the pic is 13 lbs. As far as scope size there is a Vortex Viper HSLR with fairly large turrets in there.