I Want To Start Reloading

General RE LEE

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Joined
Aug 21, 2020
Messages
48
Location
Middle Tennessee
Good afternoon folks I am looking at getting into reloading and would like a few suggestions on a starting kit you all would recommend. I also could use a few recommendations on powders for my loads. There are so many powders, and kits available it's overwhelming. Any help for a starter kit and powder would be appreciated.
 

bpcrshooter

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Jan 29, 2017
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228
Location
midwest
what are you wanting to reload (cal's)? What is your expectations of accuracy??
How many rounds do you want to reload in one session??

if your going to reload 20 rounds or so every now and then its a whole lot different set up than 200 a week.
 

CVCOBRA1

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Sep 20, 2014
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764
Location
Illinois
I would suggest getting 2-3 of the newest editions of reloading manuals and read the how too sections. Study them well. '
I've always been an RCBS guy but I'm sure today one kit is as good as the other. They all have great starter kits now. Be prepared, it can become and addiction and a never ending buying process. You will always be updating.
At this time you might get upset that the inputs are in short comings. In some parts of the country powders are down to slim pickings to say the least and primers are non existent.
Good luck.......
 

jimisbell

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Jul 24, 2020
Messages
103
Location
ingleside, TX
I started with a Lee Loader for Italian 6.5 Carcano, my only gun in 1965, figuring I could load 20 or so a week and that would be enough. I now have a Lee Classic with dies and turrets for about 20 different cartridges. When I buy a new gun I just buy another turret and dies to match it. Most have never been used because, until now ammo has been cheap enough that it wasnt worth my time.

When I could get 9mm for 16 cents a round, my labor was worth more than that. But with 9mm now approaching $1 a round, I will be reloading a few of them. Maybe more than a few...LOL. I never bothered to even pick up my 7.62x39 brass because the loaded cartridges were 15 cents a round.
 

orifdoc

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Aug 2, 2020
Messages
25
Location
Idaho
I completely agree with the suggestion to read a bunch of reloading manuals before you start. Whatever money you spend here will save you 10X more down the road. Break it down into small pieces and start with what's important. Some reload to save money, others in the pursuit of accuracy. It's a really fun hobby that requires attention to detail and quality stuff doesn't come cheaply. In general, buy right, cry once.

Establish a budget and spend most of the money on a quality caliper, a high-quality scale, and a good press. RCBS has been a favorite for decades, but others are good too.

Pick one caliber, one or two powders, one primer, and one or two bullets for starters. Read, read, read. It's a safe hobby, but only if you learn how to be safe and pay attention.

Oh, don't forget to have fun. :)
 

Vol1975

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Feb 6, 2017
Messages
289
Location
southeast
Good afternoon folks I am looking at getting into reloading and would like a few suggestions on a starting kit you all would recommend. I also could use a few recommendations on powders for my loads. There are so many powders, and kits available it's overwhelming. Any help for a starter kit and powder would be appreciated.
my suggest is to see if you can find a couple people and go and watch them reload. Do some reading and research while your watching people reloading. Maybe meet some guys at local gun range or where every. You can get a good base line on what you like and don’t like by just reading and watching other people. Reloading is expensive but fun and addicting for accuracy.
But, after you find a couple good joes, friends or whoever, Go ahead and offer to buy them some cold beverages and they will probably let you use there equipment just for the drink and Or conversation while you load and shoot Later at the range.
from that point you can figure out if you want to reload and spend the coin on reloading ammunition.

just don’t drink and reload at the same time. Only After. that lesson was learned along time ago for myself.

and yes there is always YouTube
 

aushunter1

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Joined
Nov 16, 2012
Messages
819
Location
Australia
Good afternoon folks I am looking at getting into reloading and would like a few suggestions on a starting kit you all would recommend. I also could use a few recommendations on powders for my loads. There are so many powders, and kits available it's overwhelming. Any help for a starter kit and powder would be appreciated.
Yep get a good manual that has good detailed information on the basics & advanced techniques, then read it, then read it again & then read it again before you even buy anything.

I did 3 months of research on the whole process before parting with any coin & started with all the right equipment from the start, competition dies, Oal/headpace gauges, comparitors, etc etc.

You would be suprised how many reloaders if you asked them what there CBTO is for whatever they are reloading couldnt give you the answer!

There are heaps of same/similar threads in here, I would also be checking them out-


Take youtubes with a grain of salt & cross check all information as much as possible.
 

eshorebwhntr

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Joined
Apr 11, 2009
Messages
532
Location
MD
Varget, 4350, and H1000. All of which you likely won't find right now.

IMR 4064, 4320, 4350, 7828, and 7977

Vhitavouri has options too but I'm not as familiar with them. N140, N540, N565.

Each of these are listed from fast to slow in burn rate. No guarantee they'll be best in your guns or anything. Just standard burn rates that usually work well in those cartridges.

Not sure what primers your cartridges use. There is large rifle and small rifle. Hopefully you only need large and then you can buy standard and magnum.

Calipers, Hornady bullet ogive tools, Hornady shoulder bump tools.

Priming tool. I recommend the rcbs bench mount tool.

Couple brass trays.

Dry tumbler. I recommend using the Frankford Arsenal dry media in whatever tumbler you buy.

Case lube.

Brass prep station. I recommend the Lyman. Or you can buy hand tools.

I highly highly recommend an automatic powder dispenser. I've had good luck with my rcbs charge master.

A press. I've only used an rcbs rock chucker. I'm sure the others do fine.

Some sort of brass length trimming tool.

As others have said, good manuals and read them thoroughly. I also agree with the recommendation of trying to find a local guy to show you the ropes. You'll learn a lot from watching them and also pick up on what tools they're using.

If you don't shoot a high volume I would do things in this order.

1. Buy a manual. Read it.
2. Find another reloader and see their setup.
3. Build your bench.
4. Start acquiring equipment.
5. Pick the 1 cartridge you shot the most or can't find loaded ammo for and start working with that. That will help reduce the amount of powder and primers and bullets you need.

You'll find quick this is a huge initial investment financially. But if you enjoy it it's worth it. It also eventually boils down to primers, powder, and bullets. Your equipment doesn't really wear out.

Best of luck.
 

SheepSeeker

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Joined
Sep 5, 2020
Messages
90
Location
WY
Buy the Lee reloading book and read it several times.
Lee equipment produces fine ammo and is reasonably priced.
I have it and Redding.
If you can find an experienced reloader to mentor you --- excellent.
There are good UTube videos and a lot that are not.
 

rsnell

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Joined
Oct 24, 2014
Messages
69
Buy "ABC's of Reloading" by Dean Grennell, the "Lyman Reloading Handbook" and any other reloading manual. I use the Hornady manual. I beleave Amazon has most of them. Read all of them before buying anything.
 

thwatson2

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Joined
Nov 4, 2012
Messages
217
Location
Charleston County, SC
There was a great forum on this site about ”things we learned and would’ve done differently in reloading” I think there was a consensus which I agree with: buy the tools you will actually use and not necessarily a kit. If I started all over again I’d buy a decent single stage press like the RCBS like the rock checker supreme, a nice powder drop( rcbs, lee quick measurer or my favorite JDS Quick measurer), 2 good digital scales to double check loads, and good dies like forester, RCBS,whitton, Dillon. I never had luck with Lee dies, but their quick trimmer and shell holders are cheap and good. I personally like priming on the press but it’s your choice. Get 2 different loading books, I have hornady and nosler.
powders for those rounds you mentioned could all be done with IMR 4350 and imr 4831
good luck with finding powder and primers but that should keep you going. Later you will want to add a way to anneal brass, I use sand annealing with Lee melt pot. And of course chamfer tool and pocket cleaner is always nice. From there start having fun, you will continue buying all kinds of extras
 

misterc01

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Joined
Feb 15, 2019
Messages
421
Location
Florida Panhandle
I had the opportunity to take a precision reloading class. Having read as much as I could I had a general idea of what was involved. In the class, we went into reloading a precision round with case prep, etc. At the end of the class, the instructor asked "So, how many of you think you want to reload?" about half the class raised their hands. He said about half of every class loved it, the other half was no way going to get into all that and just buy their own. My point – try it before you buy it. And of course the usual admonition – buy once, cry once.
 

rcwinkel

Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2018
Messages
19
Location
Vancouver, WA
This is a fantastic forum and way to learn, but if you have any local gun store(s) that sell reloading equipment and supplies near you, you might think about creating a relationship with one of them and buy local. In my case, as a factory authorized dealer of all things blue, we provide pre and post sales support to all, but go that extra mile for those who purchase a press from us. Even though we may be totally out of some reloading components in the front, we keep reserves in the back to make certain that when someone buys a press they have the option of leaving our shop with primers, powder, cases & projectiles. While not every shop may do this, it doesn't hurt to ask.
 

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