Hunting Coyotes at night

Ohlongarm

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Dec 1, 2019
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386
Location
ohio
I really like thermals for target detection and NV for shooting. I run a handheld thermal for finding animals and then NV for confirming the animal is what I think and taking the shot. If your in an area that has fox, bobcats, the neighbors dog potentially running around thermal may not be clear enough to differentiate them from a coyote. Other upside to Night vision is you can see IR lasers, you can't with thermal. I have a weapon mounted rangefinder and can see the laser through my night vision on my target to ensure I've got the correct range for long shots on 'yotes at night. The new FLIR IR Hunter has me considering another purchase and going to a thermal over night vision but I'm still not sure because of the reasons I stated above. Ultimate Nightvision offers rentals on some different systems so you could try them out and the rental price goes towards your purchase if you then decide to buy one.
Some ir are visible,the one i have on my Digex is invisible to man or beast.
 

Ohlongarm

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Dec 1, 2019
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ohio
I'm talking about being able to see the IR laser from the rangefinder through a Nightvision scope splashing on the intended target and that thermal doesn't give you that ability
The 940 IR on the Digex operates in the invisible mode,the 850 emits a almost indiscernible red glow,i opted for invisible.I wouldn't want anything more than what I have,it's a game changing night vision optic.
 

Ohlongarm

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Dec 1, 2019
Messages
386
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ohio
Joseph,
Thank you for your response. Very useful. So much for me to learn, but I don’t think anyone hates coyotes more than me.
Doug

Ohlongarm,
Yes, who should I be talking to at Pulsar? Thanks. Yes, I did find the folks at ATN to be high pressure and somewhat lacking in knowledge.
Thanx
Doug
Call Sightmark in Texas ask for Jake Wendt,he can get you in touch with someone who can help you,he's in charge of law enforcement sales only so he may not be able to help you directly,but can steer you in the right direction if you're not law enforcement. Sightmark Mansfield Texas 817-225-0310.
 

Buster Hemlock

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Feb 26, 2019
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NC
The 940 IR on the Digex operates in the invisible mode,the 850 emits a almost indiscernible red glow,i opted for invisible.I wouldn't want anything more than what I have,it's a game changing night vision optic.
We are talking about different things. Your talking about an IR illuminator and whether there is a detectable light at the bulb and if it can be seen without night vision/the naked eye and I agree with what you are saying with different wavelength illuminators some give off a glow if they are in the near IR range and ones above this do not, I have a few different personal IR illuminators with different wavelength bulbs. However, I'm talking about night visions ability to see the laser from a rangefinder to ensure you are lasing what you think, thermal doesn't have this ability. Most common laser rangefinders have a laser in the 850-1050 nm range and some higher end/military rangefinders have up to 1550 nm wavelength lasers, all are visible with night vision, not a beam but the splash where it is hitting. I shoot a lot at extended ranges at night and having an accurate range to your target is necessary. I've seen many weapon mounted range finders knocked off their co-witness point and no longer ranging the spot you think. Being able to see the IR laser splash on your intended target before dialing or holding your elevation gives me one less thing to worry about before pulling the trigger
 
Last edited:

IdahoSpud2

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Jul 28, 2020
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Location
Idaho
TNVC gen 3+ white phosphorus PVS14 paired with a BE Myers MAWL. These blow away the set up I had in the military by a long shot.

however if I was just going to strictly use it for coyote hunting in an area I was familiar with I would probably opt for a straight thermal scope. Pros and cons to each. I can walk around all night with him an ocular in an area I’ve never been before and still constantly shoot to 1 to 200 yards with the IR laser. However I’d be screwed beyond that range and even though it’s incredibly clear for what it is, it’s still not that great for identifying targets a couple hundred yards away.

I will say it is pretty awesome seeing coyote eyes light up like headlights when an IR laser hits them on night vision.
 

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Sid Post

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Jul 27, 2007
Messages
105
Location
Texas, USA
The most info. I have found on NV is Snipershide these guys have all the toys, great way to learn what works.
Snipershide is very good on Night Vision and Thermal options and setups though, they are generally focused on hog hunting with AR Platforms. The Night Vision subforum on AR15.com can be hit or miss depending on the topic and people responding but, there are a lot of folks there with ex-mil or law enforcement experience (not some pimple-faced mouth breather in their mommies basement) who can speak from experience about what works and what doesn't 'in the field' versus a factory demo in a groomed area.
 

06X6spdGTO

New Member
Joined
Apr 5, 2019
Messages
4
Location
Nebraska
Been night hunting song dogs coming up on 4 years now.

I started with a cheaper ATN X-Sight and a pulsar XQ30 handheld. I found that switching from Thermal handheld to NV when the dogs are running in hard become difficult to find the Target. Especially in any pasture ground with taller grass.
My next thermal buy was a pulsar Apex XD38a. It was a complete game changer!
I now run 2 FLIR PTS536 units as in western Nebraska the base magnification of 4x is important for longer shots.

It’s a buy once cry once game for sure.

For starting off these would be my main features to focus on.

1. Place your Night optic on a weapon that has the least amount of bullet drop you can get out to 350yds. Judging distance in Thermal or NV is difficult, a 6.8spc or 7-08 wouldn’t be my choice

2. which ever route you go with optic brand, pick a brand that allows for external battery packs. Nothing is worse than cold weather draining the battery and trying to change out CR123A

3 Rifle weight. Lighter is better @ least with my experience. swapping from scanner to rifle the quicker movements with a lightweight rifle can be important.

4. Base magnification vs FOV. Depending on the conditions you‘re hunting in base mag will be very important. For me I have like 50 trees in the entire county so 4 or 6x base mag is great! However when I visit friend in Arkansas my FOV is too narrow for quick follow up shots on doubles or triples.


other brand to consider for thermal

AGM Global TS50 micro
Hogster 35mm or New Super Hogster
if you can afford it Halo LR
 

Doug Herold

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Joined
Sep 14, 2017
Messages
172
Been night hunting song dogs coming up on 4 years now.

I started with a cheaper ATN X-Sight and a pulsar XQ30 handheld. I found that switching from Thermal handheld to NV when the dogs are running in hard become difficult to find the Target. Especially in any pasture ground with taller grass.
My next thermal buy was a pulsar Apex XD38a. It was a complete game changer!
I now run 2 FLIR PTS536 units as in western Nebraska the base magnification of 4x is important for longer shots.

It’s a buy once cry once game for sure.

For starting off these would be my main features to focus on.

1. Place your Night optic on a weapon that has the least amount of bullet drop you can get out to 350yds. Judging distance in Thermal or NV is difficult, a 6.8spc or 7-08 wouldn’t be my choice

2. which ever route you go with optic brand, pick a brand that allows for external battery packs. Nothing is worse than cold weather draining the battery and trying to change out CR123A

3 Rifle weight. Lighter is better @ least with my experience. swapping from scanner to rifle the quicker movements with a lightweight rifle can be important.

4. Base magnification vs FOV. Depending on the conditions you‘re hunting in base mag will be very important. For me I have like 50 trees in the entire county so 4 or 6x base mag is great! However when I visit friend in Arkansas my FOV is too narrow for quick follow up shots on doubles or triples.


other brand to consider for thermal

AGM Global TS50 micro
Hogster 35mm or New Super Hogster
if you can afford it Halo LR
Hah!...That’s pretty close to what has happened with me. Have gone Thermal to scan, thermal to kill. Just couldn’t get on them quick enuf with the IR...
 

Sid Post

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 27, 2007
Messages
105
Location
Texas, USA
...
other brand to consider for thermal

AGM Global TS50 micro
Hogster 35mm or New Super Hogster
if you can afford it Halo LR
My friend has a really old (technology), I think ~3 years, FLIR thermal. I think it is called a 32 something with a 25mm lens and I think it predates the PTS series thermals one generation. Anyway, native FOV is a bit narrow and magnification is too low. The image is really pixelated too even without zoom but, FOV is pretty wide.

What I find is at ~150 yards, it is very hard to tell a fawn from a newborn calf. Fawns that are bedded down in grass look a lot like large piglets. Trying to ID a target by movement is VERY UNRELIABLE! Light pollution where I live is really bad so, I'm hesitant to try tradition night vision. Plus, I have tried some PVS-7B's with that thermal and, to be honest was not terribly impressed but, wearing glasses I'm probably not the best judge of night vision goggles either.

I have a treeline at ~200 yards on much of my property and my friend about a mile away has up to 400 yards. I'm thinking 4x magnification would be a better match for me so I have a better target id without needing to artificially 'zoom' the image. I also wear glasses so tight eye relief is not compatible with my physical constraints.

Is the Super Hogster too narrow a FOV for cow chasing dogs or feral hogs at 200 yards? How about 400 yards?

How about a Pulsar competitive unit? How do they compare in terms of price for magnification and FOV?

I want to "cry once, pay once" without regrets like my friend with his older FLIR unit. However, $5K and up is not realistic. ;)

For a light to reasonable weight rifle, what is recommended? My LWRC Six8 is a bit piggish but, whacks feral hogs well. 5.56/.223 is too light. I have had as many as 17 feral hogs in my FOV at one time on my property so, a semi-auto is a requiement but, recoil needs to be reasonable so I get back on target quickly and hopefully I don't loose them in my FOV during recoil. I do shoot suppressed so, recoil and muzzle blast are already reduced a good deal. I also want to avoid calibers that are over $1 per round for normal hog plinking.

TIA,
Sid
 

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