Hunting boots for mountain hunting

mnoland30

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Joined
Dec 24, 2010
Messages
274
Years ago someone wrote that a pound on your foot is like 5 pounds on your back I believe it. I wear Merrel boots. Light and comfortable. Even at 7000 ft. here in central NM in December I wear uninsulated boots. In Colorado, if there is snow, you'll want some insulation, and lightweight gaiters. I've never used more than 400 gm. Thinsulate. What I've found is that if you have plenty of toe room, your toes don't get cold. You can order from Merrel directly and get just the width you need. I always take two pairs of boots on a hunt.
 

bls8433

Member
Joined
Mar 6, 2012
Messages
20
Looking for opinions as to insulation level. I know we are all different. But, my hunting has been limited to deer hunting. Walk a few hundred yards to a stand. Some walks are relatively easy, some not. My feet tend to get cold sitting in a stand. I know we will be walking more on this elk hunt, so too much insulation would be a bad thing. I have a pair of Danner Pronhorn w/400 gr. of insulation, but want to take a second pair. Suggestions?
I have had two pair of the original Danner Pronghorns which served we well but the quality of these now don't appear up to the originals. A couple years ago, I searched for a better boot and I need good arch and ankle support. I also believe a good fitting boot greatly increases the long term comfort so I wanted boots that I could try on which limited my selection. I ended up with Meindl Perfekt Hunters. They have been very good and held up well. They have 400 gram insulation and all leather. Synthetics have not been able to support my feet well enough. I use them for most of my MN deer hunting and Midseason elk hunting. They performed very well but if I sit too long, I still get cold feet. All feet are different. I have hunted November late deer season with Sorel's to keep my feet warm while my father-in-law wore uninsulated leather boots with one pair of thin cotton socks.
There are a number of very good quality boot manufactures and you will pay for this quality but worth it especially if hiking in steep terrain.
 

.gacton

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Joined
Dec 14, 2017
Messages
142
Location
Mississippi
The Danner’s fit great, and are very comfortable. I was looking at going with more insulation for the second pair, but now I think I’ll get another 400g pair. Thanks for all of the input!
 

Chadp82

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Joined
May 3, 2020
Messages
132
Location
Colorado
I live here in Colorado and hunt Sept-Nov. I use the same non-insulated boots for everything, I am a mover though. Love the hot toe heated packs in the morning. Be careful to buy the boot that fits the best not the brand recommended.

I agree on the fit statement.

I went to Scheels when I bought my last boots. They had Kenetrek, Crispi, Zamberlan, and others. I tried on probably a dozen boots since it would be the first time I was investing this much in boots. I settled on Kenetrek based on fit. Not the lightest of the bunch, but I had a tough hunt last year and no blisters, great support, and my feet thanked me. I would have gone another brand had they been the best fist.
 

treelinehntr

Member
Joined
Jun 26, 2021
Messages
16
Location
Colorado
I agree on the fit statement.

I went to Scheels when I bought my last boots. They had Kenetrek, Crispi, Zamberlan, and others. I tried on probably a dozen boots since it would be the first time I was investing this much in boots. I settled on Kenetrek based on fit. Not the lightest of the bunch, but I had a tough hunt last year and no blisters, great support, and my feet thanked me. I would have gone another brand had they been the best fist.
That's the way to do it, what a great place to try on boots. Sure wish there was a Scheels around here.
 

Quintus

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Joined
Apr 15, 2013
Messages
1,062
I got my first insulated boots 2 years ago, Kenetrek Mtn. Guides. My feet don't ever sweat much, but would still start to get cold on stand or glassing if was below 20 degrees or so. The 400 gram Kenetreks are awesome! Great support and protection with a heavy pack and my feet are always comfortable with warm or cold temps. They are heavy, but side hilling, working through blow downs, and packing they are worth the weight. The soles also have held up much better over 300 miles than my Crispis.
 

dfanonymous

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Joined
Jul 16, 2016
Messages
1,406
Hard decision. Feet are different. I wear Salomon almost exclusively now. I have some tondra I wear for the winter hunting wolves and often snow shoe with them. Light and warm. For the remaining seasons i wear Salomon with no insulation or 200 grams.
I still wear my salomon’s I used in the military. My feet get too hot. I can’t do insulated unless it’s in snow or single digits.
B9D2CD4B-851C-4F4C-8C6D-73CABCD2C0BD.jpeg
 

2ndson

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Joined
May 14, 2020
Messages
123
Location
OK
I bought a pair of Under Armour boots last year and they are by far my favorite and most comfortable I have ever used. We hike a lot of rough steep terrain and I can usually count on slipping and falling on my *** at least once. These have Michelin tire rubber on the soles and I never slipped once last year. These are super comfortable and keep your feet warm when its cold and not too hot in the early season. I really like them and after a season of lots of hiking they still look brand new and held up really well.
 

.gacton

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Joined
Dec 14, 2017
Messages
142
Location
Mississippi
I bought a pair of Under Armour boots last year and they are by far my favorite and most comfortable I have ever used. We hike a lot of rough steep terrain and I can usually count on slipping and falling on my *** at least once. These have Michelin tire rubber on the soles and I never slipped once last year. These are super comfortable and keep your feet warm when its cold and not too hot in the early season. I really like them and after a season of lots of hiking they still look brand new and held up really well.
I wear uninsulated Under Armour boots at work every day! Lightest boots I’ve ever owned. Great to hunt in early season.
 

BillLarson

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LRH Team Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2003
Messages
787
Location
No.IL.
Looking for opinions as to insulation level. I know we are all different. But, my hunting has been limited to deer hunting. Walk a few hundred yards to a stand. Some walks are relatively easy, some not. My feet tend to get cold sitting in a stand. I know we will be walking more on this elk hunt, so too much insulation would be a bad thing. I have a pair of Danner Pronhorn w/400 gr. of insulation, but want to take a second pair. Suggestions?
Danner.....
all leather
models
 

BrentM

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Joined
Jan 10, 2013
Messages
3,094
Location
Meridian, Idaho
I still wear my salomon’s I used in the military. My feet get too hot. I can’t do insulated unless it’s in snow or single digits.
View attachment 287361
I had to go to non-gortex for summer use and early archery when temps still hot. I hiked a bit this weekend scouting a new archery elk area and the boots are significantly better than my gortex. Obvious issue is getting wet. They dry out fast tho and if I'm overly concerned I pack an extra set of socks.
 
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