How to make your tripod/shooting sticks a much more stable rest?

OregonHunter2

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Let’s starts a discussion about how to improve the stability of your tripod or shooting sticks so that you can increase your effective range. Being a Spartan Precision guy, my idea is the Davros head. All you need is something with a 1/4" or 3/8" head. For example, if you have a Primos Trigger Stick, you can screw the Davros onto it. Now instead of just getting side to side stability, you get the ability to load forward into it and get a whole new range of support. You can also screw this onto your existing tripod and shoot off it more accurately with one of Spartan's universal adapters on your rifle.

What ideas do you guys have? Any pics of your setup?

Davros.jpg
 

OregonHunter2

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Yeah it's always tough to lock your body in solid. Does anyone here have tips on shooting technique for your body?
 

yobuck

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When hunting, including long range hunting, how we go about it will dictate the type equipment we use.
Solving the problems mentioned above isnt an issue, but it will restrict how you go about your hunting.
 

Bravo 4

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As far as body position goes, space creates opportunity for movement (just like fighting on the ground). Use something (bag(s)/sand sock/jacket/whatever...) to take up that space. You can practice by shooting from different rests/positions and having a buddy wedge things here and there as instructed to experiment. An example could be something like rolling up a jacket and placing it under your arm while in a seated position over tripod/sticks, or placing a rear bag under the heal of your foot to help raise the knee/leg you are resting your firing elbow on. You will notice real quick what is working or not by how small your wobble zone is.
If shooting from a tripod (especially with the front rest far forward like the picture in above post) I will carry a set of fold up shooting sticks to support the rear. Probably have a small fold up chair to be seated squared up behind the rifle. Lots of scenarios you could practice on, don’t need bullets to tell if you are getting stability or not.
 

yobuck

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As far as body position goes, space creates opportunity for movement (just like fighting on the ground). Use something (bag(s)/sand sock/jacket/whatever...) to take up that space. You can practice by shooting from different rests/positions and having a buddy wedge things here and there as instructed to experiment. An example could be something like rolling up a jacket and placing it under your arm while in a seated position over tripod/sticks, or placing a rear bag under the heal of your foot to help raise the knee/leg you are resting your firing elbow on. You will notice real quick what is working or not by how small your wobble zone is.
If shooting from a tripod (especially with the front rest far forward like the picture in above post) I will carry a set of fold up shooting sticks to support the rear. Probably have a small fold up chair to be seated squared up behind the rifle. Lots of scenarios you could practice on, don’t need bullets to tell if you are getting stability or not.
While i wont disagree with what youve said here, i will point out however that there are other things to consider.
And that would be as to wether its a hunting situation, or simply a shooting situation.
In either of coarse a first round hit or where the animal is dispatched with one shot, would make a big difference. But assuming a near miss, or even worse where the animal is hit poorly and runs off, there is no way you will stay on target and be ready for a quick follow up shot using your system.
Time is always of the essence when targeting game animals, because they control what we need do, not us.
 

Bravo 4

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You can spot your hits/misses in this manner just like any other position if you set up behind the rifle correctly. If I can set my .375 Snipetac up on a tripod with sticks of sort in the back and spot my impacts at 800 yards then surely others can do it with “lesser” rifles at closer ranges. I do it all the time with .308’s and .300 mags. I will agree that if you set up hastily for a quick shot then the odds are against it. But then again, if your prone setup isn’t correct you will struggle with self reliant spotting. This is also where you can tell if a rifle is configured to fit the shooter correctly. If you can’t just get behind it and shoot and are contorted to get sight picture then you have induced error into it. That error usually produces space and angles, neither of which is good for consistency.
 

yobuck

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You can spot your hits/misses in this manner just like any other position if you set up behind the rifle correctly. If I can set my .375 Snipetac up on a tripod with sticks of sort in the back and spot my impacts at 800 yards then surely others can do it with “lesser” rifles at closer ranges. I do it all the time with .308’s and .300 mags. I will agree that if you set up hastily for a quick shot then the odds are against it. But then again, if your prone setup isn’t correct you will struggle with self reliant spotting. This is also where you can tell if a rifle is configured to fit the shooter correctly. If you can’t just get behind it and shoot and are contorted to get sight picture then you have induced error into it. That error usually produces space and angles, neither of which is good for consistency.
Well just for kicks,
sometime setup a target at some decent distance on a sidehill preferably if you can.
Also set up another say 100 yds to the right or left, whatever your less preferred direction might be, and also downhill about 50 yards. Fire at the first target using your method, then see how easy it is to recover from the recoil, find the second target, and get a good shot off. And remember, an animal especially a wounded one wont necessarily be waiting for you to get it done.
 

Bravo 4

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I see where you are coming from and yes it isn’t the fasted. We happen to teach/train rapid target engagement, our targets start at 300 meters and go out to what most consider long range. That is 20 seconds per target per string, to find, range (with reticle) and engage. So if you have 3 targets you get 60 seconds. We do this prone and alternate positions.
 

OregonHunter2

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As far as body position goes, space creates opportunity for movement (just like fighting on the ground). Use something (bag(s)/sand sock/jacket/whatever...) to take up that space. You can practice by shooting from different rests/positions and having a buddy wedge things here and there as instructed to experiment. An example could be something like rolling up a jacket and placing it under your arm while in a seated position over tripod/sticks, or placing a rear bag under the heal of your foot to help raise the knee/leg you are resting your firing elbow on. You will notice real quick what is working or not by how small your wobble zone is.
If shooting from a tripod (especially with the front rest far forward like the picture in above post) I will carry a set of fold up shooting sticks to support the rear. Probably have a small fold up chair to be seated squared up behind the rifle. Lots of scenarios you could practice on, don’t need bullets to tell if you are getting stability or not.
Using a buddy to wedge items here and there is a smart idea. Never thought of that before!
 

TheFishBox

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Nov 11, 2010
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Here is my homemade setup. Used my atlas bipod connection and a manfroto plate for my Tripod head. The small piece in the middle is aluminum for threading both pieces together.

only downside to this setup is the fulcrum point being where it is you have to get creative with stuff to rigid up the rear of the gun sometimes.
 

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OregonHunter2

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Here is my homemade setup. Used my atlas bipod connection and a manfroto plate for my Tripod head. The small piece in the middle is aluminum for threading both pieces together.

only downside to this setup is the fulcrum point being where it is you have to get creative with stuff to rigid up the rear of the gun sometimes.
That's quite a brilliant solution! Are you guys using tripods to shoot off because they are more stable than bipods, or do you just already have one in the field so it's more of a convenience thing?
 

TheFishBox

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I always prefer to shoot off the bipod for stability reasons but the Tripod is the only way sometimes. Think steep side hill and shooting uphill from you, ain’t happening with a bipod unless you stack a ton of stuff for the bipod to sit on.
 

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