How do I start Coyote Hunting?

Treeslug

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2020
Messages
780
Location
Hill Country, Texas
The OP is in a great place to hunt coyote. The advice given here should steer him in a really good direction and have him light years ahead of the game. If I lived in SD I'd be a coyote hunting fool.
I don't even live in SD, and I am a fool. Oh, I'm sorry. You were talking about coyotes fooling around! Yep, even dumb coyotes can fool me.
 

Buck1970

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2019
Messages
122
Location
DeKalb Texas
All great advice.
This is a great place to learn and to be honest, the reason I got on this forum to hone in my long range hunting skill set, was for coyotes primarily. As was stated, cows, especially those calving, have coyotes near by. They eat the baby calf manure.

When you finish calling, wait 5 minutes before moving, but keep watching, smart yotes will often hold up for some reason and not come in to the noise. Many times I’ve gotten up to retrieve my caller to see one that had been sitting concealed, observing, take off.

When calling at night, do not stop scanning with your light, thermal, or what ever you are using to see. In the 30 to 60 second break you take, he can come in, bust you, and take off and you will never know he was there. Also, if a bright moon is out, get in the shade or shadows just like you are hunting during the day.

Not sure about up north, but February is breeding season in Texas. Find out for sure when it is because it’s one of the best times to use coyote vocals.

These are just a few extra things that might help. Predator hunting is addictive, I almost enjoy taking a wise coyote as much as taking a mature whitetail. And the coyote can be just as hard to do. Do not get discouraged or give up, one day it will just click and the rascal will run over you trying to get to the call.

Have fun and be safe. Before long you will find yourself trying to purchase a new COYOTE rifle.
 

Buck1970

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2019
Messages
122
Location
DeKalb Texas
All great advice.
This is a great place to learn and to be honest, the reason I got on this forum to hone in my long range hunting skill set, was for coyotes primarily. As was stated, cows, especially those calving, have coyotes near by. They eat the baby calf manure.

When you finish calling, wait 5 minutes before moving, but keep watching, smart yotes will often hold up for some reason and not come in to the noise. Many times I’ve gotten up to retrieve my caller to see one that had been sitting concealed, observing, take off.

When calling at night, do not stop scanning with your light, thermal, or what ever you are using to see. In the 30 to 60 second break you take, he can come in, bust you, and take off and you will never know he was there. Also, if a bright moon is out, get in the shade or shadows just like you are hunting during the day.

Not sure about up north, but February is breeding season in Texas. Find out for sure when it is because it’s one of the best times to use coyote vocals.

These are just a few extra things that might help. Predator hunting is addictive, I almost enjoy taking a wise coyote as much as taking a mature whitetail. And the coyote can be just as hard to do. Do not get discouraged or give up, one day it will just click and the rascal will run over you trying to get to the call.

Have fun and be safe. Before long you will find yourself trying to purchase a new COYOTE rifle.
 

rankin76

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 30, 2013
Messages
85
Location
yakima Wa
When I first started coyote hunting I watched and read everything I could get ahold of. I bought a call and went out and put boots to the ground. I didn’t have a mentor or anyone to hunt with.

And let me tell you… I sucked at it! There were coyotes everywhere! I couldn’t hit one to save my life…. You name it I did it! Buck fever, oh ya! to exited, couldn’t calm myself to make a good shot, call them in to close, and taking shots that I wasn’t capable of making. I did it all…

But after a short while the stars aligned, and I started to learn from my mistakes. Since then I’ve killed probably 100’s of coyotes.

1. Get a call
2. Shooting sticks. ( they never leave my truck!)
3. find some places to go and start calling.
4. Use the wind
5. Be very still
6. The country and wind dictates how load to play the call.
7. Plays sounds of critters in the area you are hunting in.
8. Plan on sitting to 25 minutes per stand
9. Don’t over think it.
10. Have a great time! Learn something every time your out!

Here is one from Monday. I was moving to another spot and caught this gal.
CCA60722-E49B-46E1-8D36-16D7D8B71262.jpeg
 
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