Hogs - No longer Nocturnal !?!

338 dude

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Exactly, that is the reason I did not understand why my state was looking into that possibility.. If I was caught killing a buzzard, my butt would be fined, I cannot imagine if I had poisoned a whole flock of them..
You should let your local politicians know how you feel
 

J E Custom

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Hogs that were nocturnal in March are now totally diurnal. Yes, that's right a creature of the day. What is going on? We had a great night hunt in central Texas the first of March using thermals. I had an opportunity to go again a couple of weeks ago. Since it was a short trip we did not rent thermals and boy were we glad we didn't. This trip the cameras showed the hogs were not out after dark. Where before they were mostly out after dark. This trip they hit the feeders as soon as they went off day time. The trip before they waited until after dark. Why the change? Have you experienced this?


Just an observation.
When Hogs change there eating times it is normally due to hunting or other types of pressure. lack of food will also make them extend their feeding time in to early morning and early evening. If they find no pressure, they will adapt to their new schedule.

I am sure there are other reasons but this is what I have observed over the years. After long absences from out hunting lease, we often see them in the middle of the day for a few days and then with the pressure, they return to feeding at night.

We try not to educate them and kill everyone we see (If we can ) but some witness the carnage and decide that night is safest. Inter the night vision hunting.:)

I don't know how smart they are on a scale of 1 to 10, but they do learn fast and seem to adapt to our schedule better than we adapt to theirs. So as they say "Adapt and overcome"

J E CUSTOM
 

Wedgy

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They die!
Not exactly....the secondary poisoning isn't usually enough to kill the animal but they are immunocompromised and susceptible to other diseases, for example over 90% of the bobcats in the Southern California area have rodent poison in their system and get mange. Not sure what happens to hawks, owls, and such.
 

GunHawk

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Just an observation.
When Hogs change there eating times it is normally due to hunting or other types of pressure. lack of food will also make them extend their feeding time in to early morning and early evening. If they find no pressure, they will adapt to their new schedule.

I am sure there are other reasons but this is what I have observed over the years. After long absences from out hunting lease, we often see them in the middle of the day for a few days and then with the pressure, they return to feeding at night.

We try not to educate them and kill everyone we see (If we can ) but some witness the carnage and decide that night is safest. Inter the night vision hunting.:)

I don't know how smart they are on a scale of 1 to 10, but they do learn fast and seem to adapt to our schedule better than we adapt to theirs. So as they say "Adapt and overcome"

J E CUSTOM
Smarter than dogs or horses.
 

Hatrick

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Not exactly....the secondary poisoning isn't usually enough to kill the animal but they are immunocompromised and susceptible to other diseases, for example over 90% of the bobcats in the Southern California area have rodent poison in their system and get mange. Not sure what happens to hawks, owls, and such.

According to the government, they die from lead poisoning.
 

Double Naught Spy

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Not exactly....the secondary poisoning isn't usually enough to kill the animal but they are immunocompromised and susceptible to other diseases, for example over 90% of the bobcats in the Southern California area have rodent poison in their system and get mange. Not sure what happens to hawks, owls, and such.

They get demodectic mange from a suppressed immune system allow the Demodex sp. mite free reign. They carry the mite all the time, just like dogs, but this sort of mange only occurs when the immune system is suppressed/compromised. This is not a contagious mange.
 

Wedgy

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They get demodectic mange from a suppressed immune system allow the Demodex sp. mite free reign. They carry the mite all the time, just like dogs, but this sort of mange only occurs when the immune system is suppressed/compromised. This is not a contagious mange.
I hunt the fringe of the city and see a fair amount of mangey coyotes, away from the city I rarely ever see them with mange. Related or not I have no idea, I'm not drawing blood or doing an autopsy, but I shoot the mange ones first and bury them.
 

scazasm

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To all who live where hogs are abundant, please send some to AZ!! I read articles saying things like "if you dont have them you will" "coming soon to your state. They have them in CA but I would never hunt in CA because I am used to hunting AZ where you can have your rifle and ammo in same vehicle while hunting and your can carry a sidearm while bowhunting. In CA them there are felonies. AZ bowhunters pride themselves on taking deer with the bow carrying a sidearm is for protection against many dangerous and even armed bad living things. Sorry, got off topic, we could use some real pigs to hunt as javelina taste like they smell, so we could use some porkers here. Thanks
 

Brett Bracken

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scazasm,
I understand your desire for good table fare and some hog hunting fun, but quite truthfully….you don’t want them in your state if you value your native wildlife and the habitat they live in. Hogs are extremely prolific creatures, intelligent and amazingly adaptable. With all that said…they are unbelievably destructive causing millions of dollars in property and crop damage in Texas, alone. Most of all they are a threat to other wildlife e.g. turkey and quail, mainly. Quite honestly…..they are a scurge. I have personally witnessed a decline in turkey and quail numbers on my ranch. In fact, I have no more quail and I attribute that to the increase in hog numbers. There just is no way to kill enough of them.
 

338 dude

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Hogs that were nocturnal in March are now totally diurnal. Yes, that's right a creature of the day. What is going on? We had a great night hunt in central Texas the first of March using thermals. I had an opportunity to go again a couple of weeks ago. Since it was a short trip we did not rent thermals and boy were we glad we didn't. This trip the cameras showed the hogs were not out after dark. Where before they were mostly out after dark. This trip they hit the feeders as soon as they went off day time. The trip before they waited until after dark. Why the change? Have you experienced this?
Hunting pressure
 

cantfixstupid

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In West Central Texas, the hogs are diunral and all depends on when you set the feeder to go off. I shoot em in the morning and the evenings and set the feeder to go off around 11PM and low and behold they there almost every time for thermal fun.
 

GunHawk

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scazasm,
I understand your desire for good table fare and some hog hunting fun, but quite truthfully….you don’t want them in your state if you value your native wildlife and the habitat they live in. Hogs are extremely prolific creatures, intelligent and amazingly adaptable. With all that said…they are unbelievably destructive causing millions of dollars in property and crop damage in Texas, alone. Most of all they are a threat to other wildlife e.g. turkey and quail, mainly. Quite honestly…..they are a scurge. I have personally witnessed a decline in turkey and quail numbers on my ranch. In fact, I have no more quail and I attribute that to the increase in hog numbers. There just is no way to kill enough of them.
They kill a lot of whitetails too; they are one of the few predators that can detect the fawns by smell. Combine that sense of smell with intelligence, numbers and herd foraging and they will be much better than bears or canids at finding fawns.
 

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