Help with Redding body only sizing die

338 dude

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The Redding body dies when used in conjunction with the competition Shell holder set (caliber specific will bump the shoulder back just enough to allow the bolt to easily close on your sized round.
Let me expand.
Assuming that you have Fl resized your brass and trimmed to length if you go to the Redding competition shell holder page in the Redding Catalog it explains how to set up your body die to achieve the correct bump.
If you have not read it very simply start with your shell holder marked +.10" a set your body die to make firm contact with the shell holder. ( Note if you have a cam over press allow it to do so.)
1) Now take this brass shell case and place it in your rifles chamber.
2) Try to close the bolt and lock it, however, do not attempt to force your bolt closed
3) Does your bolt close easily or is their resistance.
4) If your bolt will not close easily replace the + .010" shell holder with the + .008"shell holder and use a new piece of Fl resized brass repeat the process.
I myself have found that I obtain an easy bolt closing using the + .004" competition shell holder and the .300 Winchester Magnum body die, however, your results may vary. Mind you that you must perform this set up for every rifle that you own in this caliber as chambers will vary slightly.
With that said continue on until you find the Competition Shell holder that will allow your bolt to close smoothly and easily.
5) Write this shell holder number down and place it with your reloading notes.
6) You have now bumped your shoulder back enough and no further adjustments need be made.
7) Do not use a case length gauge as your chamber may vary slightly from Sammi spec however it may still be in tolerance.
If the case fits into your chamber and the bolt closes call it good!
Two Questions still remain :
A) Why did you place a new body die in a wet tumbler?
This die is metal and will rust if not thoroughly dried and something like Hornady One Shot die cleaner and case lube should have been used to clean and lightly lube your body die.
I for one would never clean a die in a wet tumbler unless it was an ultrasonic type.
Is this what you were calling a wet tumbler?
B) How are you determining your COAL shoulder bump dimension.?
Unless you are using an optical comparator, or say something along the lines of a Hornady or stony point type attachment that fits onto your digital calipers or something similar I don't know how you would actually measure your bullets shoulder bump. Or were you referring to the C.O.A.L.
Absolutely correct explanation about the Reading competition shell holder
 

Rexby4

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Decided to give my new redding body only sizing die a try to reload some 300wsm. First put the die in my wet vibritory cleaner for 20 minuets, then wiped off using action cleaner. Unfortunately lost the set up directions the redding BOSD came with. Absolutely scoured the redding sight for info but found none. So I simply began by setting it up similarly to my Redding FL sizing die directions in that touched th die to the shell holder and backed off one full turn and lowered and sized in 1/8 or 1/4 increments . First I measured a 1x fired case with my Hornady size .420" head space gauge, (did confirm I'm using the correct type E #420 bushing) lubed with One Shot and resized the case measured it saw it didn't bump back the shoulder at all which quite surprised me as the resizing stroke took noticeable effort, also I could see the entire surface of brass showing evidence of being worked by the die save for about the last 1/4" of brass near the base. I lowered the die in 1/8 turn increments sized and measured.

Did this three times with three different pieces of the same lot# 1x fired brass and the headspace measurement remained unchanged or actually grew on all three.
The force required to resize the brass increased every time until I finally stopped after 3 tries when the force required to cam over the press became in my experience much to great and I feared I would either get a case stuck or ruin the die. The cases well very very well lubed with One Shot.
Prior to resizing the brass was very well cleaned and I inspected it all and found no issues.

The brass showed no signs of damage but did show obvious signs of being worked by the die. Been reloading for 30+ years and never had instance where a sizing die failed to bump back the shoulder. Unfortunately I misplaced my Redding 300wsm FL resizing die so don't have another die to help figuring out this problem. I closely inspected the inside of the RBOSD with a very bright light and the interior looks flawless.
I even used three different types of brass, Winchester, Federal and Hornady, same results every time. Even changed shell holders from Redding, to RCBS and Lyman. I also closely inspected the Hornady headspace bushing and found no damage. I then resized some 35 Remington cases and measured before and after to confirm I had bumped the shoulder back 0.002" to insure my Caliper was working correctly.

So now for the bizarre part. When I adjusted the die down as far as I felt it could safely go Every piece of brass I resized and measured actually GREW by 0.0015" to 0.002". I checked and remeasured 3x to confirm this as accurate.

I feel I have eliminated all possible variables that could be the cause except for the die itself as I do not have a standard FL resizing die to use as a test control.

So am I setting up the die incorrectly, doing something else wrong or is the die defective?
Check this out
 

Toddxusmc

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Also I believe one shot is trash. Have had more stuck cases with one shot than any other case lube, and yes I was following instructions. For small caliber rou ds like 223 i still use it, but for anything bigger try imperial sizing wax. Absolutely changed my world.
A tip that might help you out. I have used “One Shot” sizing lube exclusively. I tried the lanolin/alcohol mix but actually prefer One Shot. The most important thing with One Shot is getting it to mix properly before using it. I take a very large plastic cup, fill it with water and bring to a boil in the microwave. I then put the can of one shot in the cup of hot water until it is quite warm (Caution: you don’t want to get it “hot” as you could burst the can). Afterward I shake vigorously and spray on brass. Most reloaders load in a basement or shop, where temperatures are cooler, this is where the problem with One Shot occurs,,the wax separates from the solvent and you don’t get proper coverage. I hope this helps you or anyone else using the product.
Regards, Todd
 

25WSM

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The absolute best thing for one shot is to give it one shot with your most powerful rifle and then get you some imperial sizing die wax. I hear more complaints on one shot than any other lube. With imperial just remember very little is all it needs and if you use to much it doesn't work better and will give you shoulder dents I shoot alot and one can of imperial last a whole season at least.
Shep
 

25WSM

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The compatition she'll holders are plus size so they only work if your die can size too far. If you take a full sheet of 320 grit paper and do figure 8s with it you can sand off .005 pretty fast. Figure 8 pattern will keep it pretty even but it wouldn't matter if it got crooked anyway. The top of the shell holder doesn't do anything pertaining to straightness unless your camming over hard. I don't ever do cam over on my presses. I like enough clearance to size the brass without the holder touching.
Shep
 

30BR

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Feb 9, 2013
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Once fired brass may be expanding cylindrically first before longitudinally. Don't worry about it as long as the brass freely chambers. I never load to max on fresh brass for this reason. (And that is with Lapua brass. I am even more gentle with other brands.) I want the brass to flow just a bit at a time for the first 3 firings...
 

wtice2506

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Jan 21, 2014
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Sorry, I dont know how to delete a post apparently. Wow I feel dumb. Shouldnt there be a delete button?
 
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wtice2506

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Jan 21, 2014
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A tip that might help you out. I have used “One Shot” sizing lube exclusively. I tried the lanolin/alcohol mix but actually prefer One Shot. The most important thing with One Shot is getting it to mix properly before using it. I take a very large plastic cup, fill it with water and bring to a boil in the microwave. I then put the can of one shot in the cup of hot water until it is quite warm (Caution: you don’t want to get it “hot” as you could burst the can). Afterward I shake vigorously and spray on brass. Most reloaders load in a basement or shop, where temperatures are cooler, this is where the problem with One Shot occurs,,the wax separates from the solvent and you don’t get proper coverage. I hope this helps you or anyone else using the product.
Regards, Todd
Seems like a lot of work to get an aerosol spray lube to work, I will stick to my imperial sizing wax. I had my suspicions about what you said though, and it makes perfect sense. I do believe you hit the nail on the head.
 

iflyskyhigh

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Mar 31, 2013
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Scottsdale, AZ
Seems like a lot of work to get an aerosol spray lube to work, I will stick to my imperial sizing wax. I had my suspicions about what you said though, and it makes perfect sense. I do believe you hit the nail on the head.
Hornady OS works great for pistol loading. Don’t have to clean it off, and one can lasts forever. But not so much for rifle loading. It just doesn’t have the lubricity of something like Imperial.
 

corsteve

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Feb 23, 2020
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oregon
need a load for a 6.5 270wsm using h1000 have 20 pds w/a 140 grn berger also what primer are u using thanks
 
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