Help with feral pig meat recipes

Wizard of Oz

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Dec 28, 2016
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My local gun shop has warned me that the local pigs, found in semi swamp country, are not fit for eating. I am confident that someone here knows a way or two to make them less gamey?. All recipes considered and all replies accepted with thanks. Cheers Wiz
 

Wizard of Oz

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Dec 28, 2016
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New South Wales Grafton / Coffs Harbour area, hunting on private land, mostly Paperbark swamp country. Cheers
 
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Oregon
get a bunch of course salt and salt the meat for 3 days, then wash with white wine with a teaspoon of pink salt #2 for a long dry cure, with some black pepper white pepper chili flakes and whatever else you got, then stuff into a large diameter beef casing and pull it tight all around with twine and hang it for a few months at around 40 to 55 degrees until its covered with white mold, then you got coppa, or capicola, or gabagool, its delicious and the italians prefer wild pig over farmed. actually look up any charcuterie, salumi, or coppa recipe, it takes the gaminess away and makes it taste nutty and it increases the vitamins and minerals because the curing breaks down everything and the pennicilim mold eats everything you cant digest and turns it into nutrients. or you can just smoke it and have a fantastic BBQ, or make bacon or pancetta... man im hungry
 

Zen Archery

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Dec 27, 2012
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514
Disagree!!! Backstraps are backstraps. Delicious.
Older/bigger hogs can be tough in texture. But ice box, drain, and repeat daily until bled out and it will tenderize.

Use any recipe you’d use for a deer is perfectly fine.

I shoot hogs monthly.
That being the case.
Under 125lbs. All meat perfect.
Between 125-150. I pull backstraps and ribs only. Easy to cook, clean and eat same/next day.
Over 150. Pull out backstraps only. Too much cartridge in rib area.
Over 200. Will check straps for toughness.
Over 300. Pull out belly fat for bacon!!!
 

Wizard of Oz

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Dec 28, 2016
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Thanks for your reply and recipe, It sounds like a lot of new skills would have to be learnt along the way, I am just learning to smoke this year, ditto salted pork etc. But...gee your recipe sounds well worth the try, now if only I could stop the Dingoes , Quolls and other assorted beasties from eating it before it's cured.... Cheers Wiz
 

Wizard of Oz

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Dec 28, 2016
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42
Ah ha!, that is easy enough for me ... shoot the little buggers or backstrap the rest, bleed well on ice. I'll post results after I've tried it, Thanks for the reply, itś exactly the reason I joined this site, you guys know more than I ever will about so many aspects of shooting, so thanks!.
 

just country

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Aug 6, 2014
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78154
morning. feral hog meat is a outstanding meat. I do not know the
circumstances of the environment of the swamp is something
the area hunters would have knowledge.
soak in cold water for 24hrs. to remove majority of the blood.
ferement in onions, garlic, salt and pepper. in crockpot or BBQ.
tabasico sauce. season as desired. cook in alumimum foil.
lots of onions,garlic, anything u like!! make tacos's, noodles
rice, vegetables. put a package of dry onion soap mix in the cooking
ingredience. some words r misspelled.
gbot tum.
 

geo4061

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Jun 25, 2014
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Southern Oklahoma
Bleed your small hog. Quarter and split back. Season and put it in a large crock pot. Cover it with your favorite BBQ sauce. Cook for 12 hours. It will fall off the bone. Great pulled pork sliders, sandwiches, or burgers.
 

double_d

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Joined
Apr 4, 2018
Messages
15
Location
texas
get a bunch of course salt and salt the meat for 3 days, then wash with white wine with a teaspoon of pink salt #2 for a long dry cure, with some black pepper white pepper chili flakes and whatever else you got, then stuff into a large diameter beef casing and pull it tight all around with twine and hang it for a few months at around 40 to 55 degrees until its covered with white mold, then you got coppa, or capicola, or gabagool, its delicious and the italians prefer wild pig over farmed. actually look up any charcuterie, salumi, or coppa recipe, it takes the gaminess away and makes it taste nutty and it increases the vitamins and minerals because the curing breaks down everything and the pennicilim mold eats everything you cant digest and turns it into nutrients. or you can just smoke it and have a fantastic BBQ, or make bacon or pancetta... man im hungry
This is something I have always wanted to try and never got bold enough. I have a large working fridge with a Johnson Controller that I used to use to ferment lagers (I can keep it at 40-55 no problem) but never got bold enough to dry-age/Cure a large ham. Sounds like you have done it before - do you need to introduce any wild yeast or anything to get the "right mold"? Anything to look out for? I'm going to give this a try
 

Wizard of Oz

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Dec 28, 2016
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42
Thanks to all who replied, I will try a few of the suggested recipes, but as I live off the grid here, space for freezers is limited..almost non-existent. The back straps seem to be very viable and some of the suggested flavours are definitely worth a try, Thanks again to all. Cheers Wiz
 

middleofnowhere

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Jun 26, 2016
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302
Location
Yucca Valley, CA
I shot a particularly nasty old boar, full of testosterone. We thought it would be terrible but I didn’t want to waste. I ground up over a hundred pounds and made chorizo sausage. We crockpotted a couple roasts and the back straps and made the best pulled pork. The meat was delicious in it’s own right, different from a young sow for sure, but good.
 

Doodle

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Joined
Sep 26, 2016
Messages
21
Sugar and spice can both help offset strong gamey flavors. Try seasoning the meat heavily with spices and pairing it with a fruit based sauce (like a smashed cherry/brandy/thyme/stock reduction). You can also try soaking smaller cuts of meat in milk, a technique we commonly use to reduce “fishiness” in certain sea creatures.
 

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