Help me to check my boxes for my elk hunt this year

FlGunner

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Joined
Jan 9, 2016
Messages
261
Location
Florida
Here's maybe an unexpected question. Are you absolutely sure there will be available water to filter in the area you might expect to hunt should you decide to stay overnight? I have lived in Colorado and hunted elk here for 33 years. I have run into more situations than I care to remember where springs, small streams, and seeps that have always had water were suddenly dry. This is caused for too many natural reasons to discuss here. This happen just last year in an area our group has hunted and camped in for at least twenty years. Where we used to grab water was dry. We spent half a day "hunting" while looking for another water source. We found one two ridges and a mile away. We were at 8700 feet.

Just suggesting you try to verify with your drop camp outfitter water availability before you arrive. Friends hunted in the Meeker area last fall as well and found no water except on private property. Drought years can be very tough everywhere in Colorado.
Our outfitter is packing some water in and will resupply if needed. Said he’s gonna set us up in an area that has water and elk to the best of what he can. Said that would be something he stays in communication with us on. Said actual placement of drop camp would be dependent on where he was finding elk and water.
 

Upsidedownjack

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Joined
Dec 28, 2017
Messages
160
Along with a good knife (or 2) some kind of Saw for bone. Assumeing that your NOT going to have to Hang your meat up, that means your going to cut and or Bone everything. So, plastic bags for placing your Meat in and some way to hang it high so OTHER criters can NOT get into your Elk! They will!
Bring a Friench Press and some Great Coffe and Good BISCOTTI! Everything else is highly Questionable ! Have a great hunt!
 

mnoland30

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Joined
Dec 24, 2010
Messages
273
I spike camped for February aoudad hunts many times. I'd carry enough water for one night and 2 days. A thin 3/8" blue pad is enoguh if you find pine duff to sleep on. Digging a shallow hole for your hip makes it much better. I use a Go Lite Lair Tarp Tent that weighs 13 oz. I also have an 8 oz. Bivy bag, so don't need a ground cloth. If you really want a light weight stove, make an alcohol stove out of a tomato juice can. My entire cook kit weighs 6 oz. Other than water, I could spike camp with only an extra 7 lbs. in my pack. Sawyer filters are light, inexpensive, and work very well. Are you hunting solo? If not, get Garmin RINO radios to keep track of your partner. If so, get a Personal Locator Beacon. It is the size of a small flip phone, and will send a satellite SOS with your GPS location. It gives my wife a warm fuzzy feeling when I carry it while hunting alone. I have a blood clotting pad in my first aid kit. Hope to never use it. We use 70 oz. Platypus water bags. Nothing lighter, and they are surprisingly robust. Even if you live at altitude, you'll need to drink lots of water. If you're a flatlander, you'll need more to prevent high altitude sickness. Make sure your flashlight can't turn on by itself in your pack. I like the green strapped Energizer light because the first light that comes on is red. Supposedly, elk can't see red light, so we walk in the morning with red light. I carry a spare that uses button batteries. On our October CO elk hunt we got 6" of snow, so a pair of light weight gaiters was essential. Walk with a pack to get in shape for your hunt. It helps more than anything I've tried. I've had good luck with the Hoochie Mama Elk Call. It is almost idiot proof. Good luck.
 

Goldengun

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Joined
Mar 19, 2019
Messages
161
Location
oklahoma
Bum wipes
Tarp for sitting under in extreme heat or rain
bore snake
550 cord w/D-ring
KT tape
sun screen
sun glasses
insect repellant
extra wool socks, glove liners and base layer in something waterproof
sent free deodorant and baby powder
 

Carlos88

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LRH Team Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2020
Messages
434
Location
Benbrook TX 76126
Vaseline, cotton balls, windproof matches and/or lighter. Screwdriver with appropriate bits (like Vortex makes). 4x or 6x scope spare. Small amount of gorilla duct tape to fix torn or broken things. Body & bum wipes (do not scrimp on them). Blister repair, orajel.
 
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FEENIX

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LRH Team Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2008
Messages
16,997
Location
Great Falls, MT
So here’s what I got going on....I signed up for a drop camp elk hunt in Colorado (1st Rifle). Did the guided hunt thing a couple of times but decided to try my hands on a diy drop camp. My plan is to be able to pitch a tent and stay over night if I have too away from the wall tent the outfitter is setting up for me and a partner if I find elk a long ways away from it. I’ve stayed out in the wilderness in Montana twice and loved it (Bivy).
So far for clothing I have bought a set of Sitka clothing.... base layers, mountain pants, core light weight hoodie, ascent shirts, jetsam jacket, gaiters, and wearing same boots I used in Montana. I have bought a Garmin in reach explore plus and a Garmin hunt view Colorado map card to use in Garmin alpha. I have a jet boil cook set and a bladder for my mystery ranch pack.. aside from a tent and sleeping bag what else do you guys think I should look at getting to ensure I got the necessities?

I know I need a water purifier of sorts but not sure which one as I have never used one.
Create an "actual/physical checklist" for you to go over.
 

HunterLV

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Joined
Sep 9, 2011
Messages
47
Location
Pioche, Nevada
Attached is a list that I have used for the last few years. I try to just put it all down, and have it at least remind me of some items that I may not need on this particular trip, but at least I can see them and eliminate them; or include them. After reading the other posts, I can see that I need to add to this list. Feel free to use/share this. HunterLV
 

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