Gun Shop advice wanted

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by o2bwest, Jan 9, 2014.

  1. o2bwest

    o2bwest Well-Known Member

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    I opened a gun shop this year. I would like to hear from you guys about what you like and dislike about the shops you visit. What do you look for what is missing? What is the ideal gun shop?
     
  2. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    The biggest thing I can say is don't adopt the attitude that everyone that walks through the door is an idiot and knows nothing about guns. That is a huge turn off for real buyers and so many shops have got it. Listen to your customer first so you can suggest options they truly need. It is way better to say I am sorry I cant answer that than offer a bs story. They will appreciate honesty and respect.

    After that good clean used guns reasonably priced, clean dusted shelves, gear and components along with a smile and time to talk would make it an enjoyable experience to me. This would bring me back to buy rather than order on line all the time. I would much rather do cash and carry than internet sales if possible.

    Hope this helps and the best of luck to you. I miss the days of a sloe proprietor gun shop in every town.

    Jeff
     
  3. CB11WYO

    CB11WYO Well-Known Member

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    Agree with Jeff for sure. Also, good lighting. I'm tired of stores and pawn shops where i feel like I need to bring my own flashlight to be able to see what they have on their shelves. Some places are so dark and dreary it makes me wonder what other extra-curricular activities are goin on :rolleyes:

    Cleanliness for sure, I don't need to eat off your floor but I don't wanna leave feeling like I need to shower :D
     
  4. Nimrodmar10

    Nimrodmar10 Well-Known Member

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    the main thing I like about a good gun shop is that you're able to walk in and handle the guns without having to ask permission or for the gun shop owner to hand them to you. Having the guns locked behind a glass case or behind the counter out of reach is a real turnoff for me. You'll sell a lot more guns that way.

    Also I like to find a shop that has a large selection of reloading components and equipment. If you can find a good source of powders primers and bullets in this present market buyers will beat a path to your door.
     
  5. midwesthunter

    midwesthunter Well-Known Member

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    Broz is spot on. I would add don't get greedy, A local shop that is a pretty good shop lost a good bit of customers because during the AR-15 buying madness they were selling AR's on gun broker for 3x what they were in the store. So they kept putting in store customers on the back burner. My one buddy who would buy 1-2 guns a month from them was one of them. Another would be while I know its hard to keep a lot of inventory in stock, I hate it when a shop advertises all different manufactures but has hardly any inventory and just tell you I can order it. I'm one of those guys if I walk into a shop looking for a gun I plan on walking out with it not ordering it. Unless its not a popular firearm. Also cheap transfers. That has got some my buisness
     
  6. MHO

    MHO Well-Known Member

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    I agree with everyone. To add one thing put a price on them. I know it sounds small but everyone wants to know one thing, HOW MUCH.
     
  7. mtnwrunner

    mtnwrunner Well-Known Member

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    +1 on all the above. One of the things I would also suggest is to have a "customer" area AKA bullshit area. It's nice to hang around other folks who have to same passion and a sit down coffee area would do wonders for your store. Couple of tables and chairs, reading material and access to do it yourself coffee. Man, what else do you need.
    As a customer, I would also like to see a ample supply of inventory. When one walks in and you have more at home than the shop you are it isn't a turn on for me.

    Randy
     
  8. MONTADO76

    MONTADO76 Well-Known Member

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    I would like to suggest that your employee's have firearm knowledge and don't try to sell their opinion.
     
  9. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    Unfortunately between the general lack of respect for other people and property and liabilities being what they are the days of that kind of shop are all but over.

    People will steal these days just because they can and you never know when some crazy --- would come in with ammo in his pocket, load one up and start blazing away.
     
  10. SavageShtr

    SavageShtr Well-Known Member

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    Man you got a lot of great advice. Put all of the suggestions you have received all together and you would have one of the nicest gun shops around. The only problem I could see is you wouldn't have any room for inventory with all the gun nuts hanging around!! it's just too bad you weren't closer to where I live.
     
  11. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    I"d say you've already pretty well got the basics covered here. The most important thing to me though is having only qualified knowledgeable working there. If no one or only one person has a clue and you have to go through two or three different people to get a straight answer.

    As for inventory, no one can afford to even get close to keeping one of everything. Keep those items in stock which you know will sell and have a list of sources ready so you can get the oddball or specialty items quickly.

    The chain stores WILL have the common quick sale items on their shelves. What you have to do is focus on the rest and offer the best possible service because they surely do not.
     
  12. o2bwest

    o2bwest Well-Known Member

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    At my shop We typically invite everyone to come behind the counter and handle all the long guns. Handguns are in the case but if I don't have many people in the shop I let people help themselves to the pistols. We are a small store in a small town.
     
  13. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    That's the advantage of knowing pretty much everyone. Our store here is similar, just ask and if they know you, they say go ahead.

    Nothing beats small town living.
     
  14. Nimrodmar10

    Nimrodmar10 Well-Known Member

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    In my local shop, that would be pure suicide. He wouldn't get off more than 1-2 shots. All of the employees, probably 12-15 at all times, are armed with loaded sidearms. This shop has probably 600-800 customers a day, mostly Interstate traffic, and has never had a problem. They also allow customers to carry loaded firearms as long as they remain holstered.

    And this shop also allows customers to handle all the used, and quite a few new, long guns, on racks on the open floor. The pistols and higher priced long guns are behind the counter, but the have lots of employees to help.

    Needless to say, with their large amount of business, this shop has tons of inventory and a coffee corner with couches and a big screen TV.