GOOD TRIGGER WEIGHT FOR A HUNTING RIFLE?

azsugarbear

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I believe so much of the answer depends on where you live (read: weather conditions & temp) and your style of hunting. If you are sitting in a tree stand for hours in cold weather, that will influence your choice of poundage. Likewise, if you are still hunting in thick vegetation where only a 'snap shot' is offered - your trigger will be set accordingly.

I live in AZ where the temp is mild (comparatively) and weather conditions usually to die for. The landscape is generally open. Most of my shots come at longer distances where I have plenty of time to set up my shot. Most of these situations are a lot like shooting steel in practice sessions. Accordingly, my triggers are set lighter than most.
 

Hal The Slayer

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Just reading some of the replies kinda gets me to thinking,would I rather walk in front of a fellow hunter with a trigger pull of 1.5# or less,or a hunter with a 2.5 to 3.5(# trigger? Walking thru brush or high grass, could just be me but, I've always been a safety first hunter. " Anything mechanical can always fail ".( Henry Ford )
 

LVJ76

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2 ounce on my smallbore silhouette rifle, 3 ounce on my high power silhouette rifle and 2 to 2.5 lbs on my hunting rifles
 

alseg

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Jul 7, 2012
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Western Pennsylvania
I replaced all my Remington 700 triggers with Timney triggers set at 3-3.5 lbs, which match my Tikka T3 and T3x factory trigger feel and weight. That way, all of them seem about the same and in my comfort zone.
 

drakehammer

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Potsdam, NY
Just reading some of the replies kinda gets me to thinking,would I rather walk in front of a fellow hunter with a trigger pull of 1.5# or less,or a hunter with a 2.5 to 3.5(# trigger? Walking thru brush or high grass, could just be me but, I've always been a safety first hunter. " Anything mechanical can always fail ".( Henry Ford )
I’ll take the guy who is unloaded walking through brush. Trigger pull is kinda irrelevant in that situation imo only.
 

ofbandg

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Jul 26, 2015
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I like 2.5 pounds on my deer and sheep rifles, but closer to 4.0 on the big hitters which are used as much for protection against grumpy critters as hunting. Dangerous game and lite triggers are a bit scary for me. I know this is all wrong but I also like a bit of creep in my triggers just to let me know when it is ready to go. It may have to do with all the two stage triggers I grew up with, or the cold fingers I often hunt with but I like a bit of creep on hunting rifles.
 

azsugarbear

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Although the OP asked what we were using for our trigger pull weights, I suppose it was only a matter of time before someone started offering up opinions on what is safe or safer vs. unsafe.

Many of us were taught growing up that light trigger weights were 'unsafe'. In reality, that is down the safety list a little ways. If a gun does not have a round in the chamber, then trigger pull weight or a safety becomes a mute point. Likewise, these things matter little as long as the muzzle is always pointed in a safe direction. If your gun handling is sloppy, then it pretty much doesn't matter what your trigger pull weight is. Yes, mechanical things can fail. That is why I try not to rely on them.

When I hunt, my rifle is unloaded. Nothing in the chamber and nothing in the magazine. Even though my rifles are repeaters, I tend to single feed them when shooting. When I find the animal I want to take, I set up my rifle and shooting position to where I feel comfortable. I then range the animal and get my firing solution. Then I dial up. I take a wind reading and then dial in windage. If time permits, I will even dry fire a couple of times to help me settle in. When everything is done and I am finally ready to send one down range, I place a round in the rifle and chamber it. At this point, I fail to see how a 2.5 - 3 pound trigger is any more safe than a 1 pound trigger.

Everybody is entitled to their opinions, but I do tend to chuckle a little when blanket statements are made without taking into account individual circumstances. As for walking in front of someone' rifle barrel, well.............
 

Dorran Larner

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Dec 4, 2019
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Sheridan WY
I think if you are hunting in cold weather with gloves and your trigger is under 1# you are flirting with danger. It's not precision shooting, trying to repeatedly hit the same spot for score, hit the lungs and you are taking meat home.
 

RD57

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Oct 10, 2017
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East TN
2 lbs + .25 lbs, depending on rifle trigger. Regardless of the trigger scale weight I want them to all break with the same feel. I personally don't like it in the oz's for my hunting rifles due to a reduced feeling wearing gloves in the winter.
 

Bigeclipse

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Aug 10, 2012
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Seems that after getting used to a 1.5 lb. trigger on my competition rifle I want to have a hunting rifle with a pull of no more than 2.5 lbs.

So what do "all y'all" have for your hunting rifle trigger pull weight (if it is adjustable.that is)?
(Translation for western Pennsylvanians: "What's yuns's trigger pull weight?")

Eric B.
All my rifles sport 2-2.5lb triggers. I do not shoot past 400 yards though.
 

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