Good compression sacks

Discussion in 'Backpacking Gear & Clothing' started by Nuclear Worker, Apr 19, 2019.


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  1. Nuclear Worker

    Nuclear Worker Well-Known Member LRH Team Member

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    Heading for Alaska on a Dall Sheep hunt and need a couple compression sacks. Anyone have some for sale? What brand do y’all use ? Good or bad responses please.
     
  2. Salmonchaser

    Salmonchaser Well-Known Member

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    I picked up a couple of small and medium size from Cabelas last year. Not cheap but worked great and I didn’t have to go to REI to get them.
     
  3. Muddyboots

    Muddyboots Well-Known Member

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    I've had a couple large ones and a medium size one for about 10 years. It is incredible how much gear you can compress in a really good compression bag. Unfortunately I do not know where I got them but just sharing their features that I think made them work great. If I find the name I will post up. They may have been from Cabelas but I know they don't carry this one any more.
    • Ripstop material that is extremely tough so you can cram stuff into the bags without fear of tearing them. Plus they get banged up being tossed around by the outfitter etc. and never had a tear. Survived a lot of panniers being crammed down for pack-in and pack-out.
    • Surface slippery which allows you to slide in bulkier gear easier for compression plus the outside slippery helps repel water, snow etc. The slippery nature is a big deal to allow sleeping bags etc slide into the bag easy.
    • Mine have the fold over top that makes them pretty much water tight with a final strap with a heavy duty plastic snap buckle to secure the fold where you want it plus maintain water tight conditions.
    • Air release valve is sturdy so as you compress the bag with the fold roll over top allows easy air release and seals the bag tightly. I never had a bag regain air from this valve. The valve can make or break how well the bags actually work. I would spend a lot of time evaluating the valve and how the bag seals up for the final compression and air release.
    Muddy
     
  4. Nuclear Worker

    Nuclear Worker Well-Known Member LRH Team Member

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    Thanks for the help
     
  5. Rick Richard

    Rick Richard Well-Known Member

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    Not exactly compression bags per say, but I have been using the dry bags from Walmart for the past 6 years. You can really pack them down and all your gear stays good and dry. I use these since the outfitter requires each persons load can't exceed 40 lbs for the 9 hour horse pack trip in and out. Anyway, thought I would mention it as another alternative. Good luck on your hunt!
     
  6. Nuclear Worker

    Nuclear Worker Well-Known Member LRH Team Member

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    Thanks for the response
     
  7. cahunter805

    cahunter805 Well-Known Member

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    Sea to summit makes some good compression bags and dry sacks. The e-vent bag is awesome for sleeping bags.
     
  8. shphtr

    shphtr Well-Known Member

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    Your best selection is prob going to be with REI. The best guidance is prob you get what you pay for .... and whatever u decide on, they do last a long time. My number two choice would be Cabela’s. Since sheep season does not start until 10 Aug u should have lots of time to order on line. Many people plan to arrive a day early so they can shop for anything they forget to purchase. Now a days u should be able to order pretty much what ever u need on line but I would shop early as the shopping can get a bit crazy as July arrives and everyone “sudddenly” realizes hunting season is almost here. There is both a large REI store and a Cabela’s in Anchorage. Many local sheep hunters and guides also shop at Barney’s Sports Chalet which is about 2 blocks from the new REI store. Prob ought to read Tony Russ’s book on sheep hunting if you have not already. Average shot is usually 75 to 300 yards. Good luck. Oh yes ... Aug and Sept are the rainiest months of the year so good rain gear is highly recommended!
     
  9. Nuclear Worker

    Nuclear Worker Well-Known Member LRH Team Member

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    Thanks