Getting the Best Precision and Accuracy from Berger VLD bullets in Your Rifle

ratrod54

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Oct 30, 2014
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So, for anyone trying this method... Is the idea is to start at a fixed seating depth and do a ladder test to determine the best charge. Then one there, begin to adjust the seating depth? There has to be a constant to begin with I am assuming. I am not a fan of jamming and I believe that bergers do better with jump, so I planned on starting at .020 and finding the best charge. Then adjust seating from there. This sound flawed?
 

nksmfamjp

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Jan 5, 2004
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So, for anyone trying this method... Is the idea is to start at a fixed seating depth and do a ladder test to determine the best charge. Then one there, begin to adjust the seating depth? There has to be a constant to begin with I am assuming. I am not a fan of jamming and I believe that bergers do better with jump, so I planned on starting at .020 and finding the best charge. Then adjust seating from there. This sound flawed?
Yea, often it is like book length, max length, mag length and find charge by OCW focusing on small Sd. Then dial CBTD back in 0.005” increments until your dial in group. Then run ocw again to tighten sd.
 

Mikecr

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the idea is to start at a fixed seating depth and do a ladder test to determine the best charge. Then one there, begin to adjust the seating depth?
I know this is common, but it's also horribly backwards.
How are you going to interpret ladders if you're loaded with bad or worst seating? Maybe worst primers?
You could end up cherry picking from garbage..

New ideas:
1. Optimum seating is independent of powder.
2. Don't bother with a ladder until your brass is fire formed to stable dimensions.
3. So while fire forming, go ahead with FULL coarse seating testing to find apparent best.
4. Second fire forming is a good time to test for best primers as well.
5. With best coarse seating at least, -then move to powder testing.
6. After powder, go back to seating, but fine tweaking of it for tightest group shaping.
 

ratrod54

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Oct 30, 2014
Messages
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I know this is common, but it's also horribly backwards.
How are you going to interpret ladders if you're loaded with bad or worst seating? Maybe worst primers?
You could end up cherry picking from garbage..

New ideas:
1. Optimum seating is independent of powder.
2. Don't bother with a ladder until your brass is fire formed to stable dimensions.
3. So while fire forming, go ahead with FULL coarse seating testing to find apparent best.
4. Second fire forming is a good time to test for best primers as well.
5. With best coarse seating at least, -then move to powder testing.
6. After powder, go back to seating, but fine tweaking of it for tightest group shaping.
So I have heard this many times and makes complete sense as I have new brass that needs to be fire formed. What charge weight does someone use though for starters?

7/08 with 175gr bullets. Looking for H4350 data for a place to start. I was planning on running from 38.1 up to 41.8 at .3 grain increments (will likely find limit before get to 41.8). So just load 38.1, find best grouping and then build ladder test off of that?
 

ratrod54

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Joined
Oct 30, 2014
Messages
21
So this is the first time I’ve done a load work up like this. I don’t feel like anything just jumped off the page. Curious, should I have seen 1/2-3/4 MOA at some point?

I am capable of shooting groups like that so I feel like my expectation isn’t unrealistic.
 
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