Flattened primers acceptable pressure sign?

adam32+P

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^^^This!^^^

The action isn't the weak point, the brass it. The brass will fail well before the action. Easy bolt lift and a slight ejector mark isn't going to hurt anything except shorten brass life, maybe!

I don't see anyone making that statement to all the SS shooters that are well over pressure to reach their claimed velocities...
 

misterc01

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Have you chronoed the velocity? I was looking for a 2800fps velocity on a load, and it chronoed at 2950, and faint pressure signs I was not really worried about, BUT I backed off a bit and am at about 2850, all looks good and am happy wtih it. .
 

Calvin45

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Truth be told those pressure signs everyone talks about like they’re gospel are guesses at best.

Winchester factory super x power points absolutely pancake primers and give ejector marks on the brass. I don’t worry too much about it.

cratering is another matter

and a stiff bolt means back off.
 

FEENIX

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The action isn't the weak point, the brass it. The brass will fail well before the action. Easy bolt lift and a slight ejector mark isn't going to hurt anything except shorten brass life, maybe!

I don't see anyone making that statement to all the SS shooters that are well over pressure to reach their claimed velocities...
"I" will never advise the OP to take an unnecessary risk. As I previously noted, I do not like any signs of pressure with my load. What you do with yours is entirely up to you.
 

jessej

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I like accurate rifles. I like fast rifles. I LOVE rifles that shoot their best groups at top velocity. But we all dont hafta love the same thing right......
I personally don’t start calling it a warm load until I see craters and ejector marks. And “I” don’t back off a load until I get a stiff bolt. Now I will be a bit more conservative if I’m working on a load that’s gonna leave south Mississippi elevation and go shoot at 8k -10k ft elevation.
 

Shane Lindsey

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OP...This has started to go sideways.

IF you are relatively new to reloading, follow the manuals and try to operate with in it. Pressure is tied to velocity and can be visible on cases. Your case is showing signs of pressure, take that for what it is worth. Only you can decide what is safe for YOU. We all want hot rods, that is why we reload (at least I do). Not all will get you there. If you want faster, get a bigger case, otherwise you gotta roll with what you got. Only difference noticed is that you drop below 1800 FPS 50 yards sooner and the only reason you know that is because the ballistic app tells you so.
 

Shane Lindsey

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So, I will throw out another thought.

IF all the components you currently have on hand is all there EVER will be (you know zombies comin & chit) would you still push the cases as hard? You will only get five loads vs maybe ten.
 

claybreaker

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Just on the pic it seems a little hotter than I like, but you likely get a some relief in cooler temps.

But my question is what you are giving up if you back it off a little? some speed of course, but what about group size? or fps spread?

You may be able to compensate for any of those loses with some load tweaking with sitting depth, different primer, neck tension,.... Heck you may end up with some improvements.

Good Luck,
 

J-B welder

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Selkirk
Quick question, did you notice if the primers were high when you seated them?
Or possibly low? I don't uniform my primer pockets because I don't shoot long enough distances for its effect to show up. I have found that the deepest seated primers tend to flatten a little more, probably because they are slamming back into the bolt face harder.
 
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