First reloading press- single stage??

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by Vortex!, Oct 14, 2018.

  1. Vortex!

    Vortex! Well-Known Member

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    Screenshot_20181014-191339.png

    Thinking of getting this as my first reloading press.
     

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  2. gohring3006

    gohring3006 Well-Known Member

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    It’s a beast!
    For about 30-50$ more you can get a Rockchucker. Not really sure if it’s a upgrade though. The Classic cast is a good press.
     
  3. Gregg C

    Gregg C Well-Known Member

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    As a first reloading press , I believe a single stage is the ONLY choice. From ther it is simply a matter of brand or size pick. Maybe look to the future: are you thinking of a 50BMG at some point ? Then buy a press that will accomodate that case, but still a single stage. I have had a progressive set up, and there is a LOT going on , just a bunch of potential for missteps, everytime you move the handle! Also, for precision shooting and loading, you're probably going to weigh every powder charge anyway. My first press was a lower price point RCBS single stage, and I still made alot of mistakes. My opinion only.
     
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  4. Vortex!

    Vortex! Well-Known Member

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    I don't plan on reloading 50 bmg ever. I don't need it. 270 mostly. Maybe 223, 243, and 6.5 Grendel eventually.
     
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  5. Gregg C

    Gregg C Well-Known Member

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    Well dang. A single stage press is a good fit for a bolt action rifle. My experience with auto loaders made me buy that progressive in that instance. But precise loading just was not it's forte-spitting out mass amounts of ammo was. They are expensive too. I still think a single stage press is the way to go for someone getting started on hand loading. Progressive presses are freaking busy, man ! Just sayin. Lee makes good stuff, and that's a good price . They've been around a long time. I personally don't think you'll be disappointed. If your 223 and Grendel are auto loaders you may want to shell out the dough at a later time for a progressive after you get a feel for loading. Just my penny and a halfs worth.
     
  6. Deviant

    Deviant Well-Known Member

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    Buy once cry once. Get the Forster Coax and don't look back.
     
  7. MudRunner2005

    MudRunner2005 Well-Known Member

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  8. Canhunter35

    Canhunter35 Well-Known Member

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    I went with the hornady lock n load press, I really like the lock n load bushings, other than that it’s probably the same as the rest
     
  9. jpd676

    jpd676 Well-Known Member

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    Dude, buy a Dillon! If you ever have a question they will walk you through it right on the phone. I have a Dillon 550B and use it as a single stage press for precision loading though. It rocks for doing pistol loads as a progressive.
     
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  10. Heavyiron

    Heavyiron Well-Known Member LRH Team Member

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    I started out with the lee, but bought a rock chucker 15 years ago. The lee will do whatever you want . But you can get the rockchucker and it requires less physical exertion to do case forming
     
  11. Crunchy

    Crunchy Member

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    Echo what most have said. Single stage for precision, and progressive for handgun or 223 ammo.
     
  12. MudRunner2005

    MudRunner2005 Well-Known Member

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    I spent 4 months working on autodrive-ran Dillon Super 1050's every single day... As long as you don't try to run it too fast, and you learn all the tips and tricks to properly setup and gauge the shell plates to avoid feeding issues and indexing issues, you'll be ok. But trust me, unless you're ready for a beginner nightmare, do NOT buy a progressive to start out with to learn the basics...Those machines have WAY too many moving parts to learn how to calibrate and gauge when you're first starting out reloading.

    He can buy that $300 Rock Chucker starter kit, and at that point, all he'll need is some calipers, a comparator, and dies to get started. If he wants to upgrade, he can get a Chargemaster 1500 to go with his kit, and that will make life easier, as well.
     
  13. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    The Lee is a very good press that will be all you ever need for precision loading.

    As time goes on if you want you can add a few of the doo dad's that "make it go faster" but it won't make you load any more accurately nor will spending more on your first press.

    I got along just fine with a couple of Lee and an RCBS single stage loaders for almost forty years before I got a heck of a deal on a Redding T-Mag which is still a single stage but I can rotate which die set is up by indexing the top which does save a little time here and there.

    If you want to load massive amounts of ammo the Dillon is the way to go but you'll never get the accuracy out of a progressive you can get from a single stage press.
     
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  14. Deputy819

    Deputy819 Well-Known Member

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    Vortex!,
    I have that press and use it for sizing. I decap and seat on another press. I've had zero problems with it and combined with other components it consistently gives me handloads with .002 or less TIR. I bought the optional mounting plate accessory to compliment it. The other presses mentioned are great presses....this is just my 2 cents on the Lee. Also, check out the MEC Marksman.
     
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