first prairie dog hunt and need info

codyadams

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I don't think it's possible to go prairie dog hunting and not have fun ha ha...I have been going with my dad since I was 5, and 20 years later I'm still not tired of it lol about the only thing that brings down a prairie dog hunt is rain.

If it's a nice sunny day, I like to get out there about 7-9ish, after the sun has been up for a while but the mirage hasn't got bad yet. I don't care how good your glass is, if your out there at 2 in the afternoon, you will kill lots of dogs, but it's flippin hard to see those little buggers if you wanna make some long shots.
 

bighurt

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Oct 18, 2015
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Mirage is one thing we have never delt with. Here in Tn. About 300 to 400 yards is about the max. I have Vortex glass on all of my guns. I have always had pretty good luck with them so far.

It is turning into a job finding the right guide at a price the whole group will be good with. My son and I are planning on 10 to 12 days total because we are going to watch some baseball, eat some RIBS and Steak and basically just see the sites out that way. We are really looking forward to it.
 

codyadams

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Sweet, sounds like a good time. I have set up a BBQ on the tailgate while shooting dogs before, it's a good time. There's a lot out here to see, especially if your in to history. The town I live in has the first ever JC Penny ha ha
 

bighurt

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We all live in and around Nashville and to get out where there are wide open spaces will be something different for sure. All of the farms around here are all turning into subdivisions. People raise cain about deer eatting their flowers and gardens, getting in the roads and wandering through there yards but never take into account that the deer where here long before they moved from no telling where and where they live now the deer lived for the last 100 plus years. We have been taken over by people that say they are nature lovers as long as it does not inconvenience them.

It is a GREAT place live but we are kinda losing what made Nashville really Nashville to some extent and that is kinda sad. Those of us from here just have to set back and smile at how stupid some can be because you aint gonna stop progress......not around here anyway.
 

codyadams

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Ya, that seems to be how it goes. My family moved here from a town of about 3,000 in northern California back in 1994, and its crazy to see how much it has changed since then. Not a big fan of California anyway, but its still sad to see where its going.
 

quigley257

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I got started dogging 20+ years ago with a friend of mine who hunted on the Rosebud reservation in South Dakota. It was great until the tribe decided it would be a great idea to raise all the fees through the roof and put all manner of restrictions on hunters. We stopped going there after they mandated a native "guide". The guy we were assigned didn't have a clue and more or less just sat around eating our food and drinking our sodas. The nail in the coffin was when they decided that they wouldn't allow handgun hunting. We had three guys in our group who were into long range handgun shooting. We have since been going to Medora, North Dakota. It is a great town to stay in with lots of things to do. Lots of public hunting land within reasonable driving distance that holds good numbers of dogs. Google Earth can be your friend when it comes to finding dog towns. There are a number of great towns to shoot near Medora. Some are "drive in"(which generally see a lot of pressure) while there are also great "rimfire range" towns that get very little pressure if you are willing to walk a ways. We have been going there long enough now that we have local connections which helps with private land access. The local game and fish officers have always been very helpful any time we look for new areas. Good luck in your search. Dogging is one of my favorite pastimes.
 

bighurt

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Thanks for the info. There are so many options but on our first trip we are leaning toward an outfitter. We are looking forward to it no doubt.
 

budlight

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smalltruck

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Big areas of western SoDak were placed off limits to prairie dog hunting by the feds a few years ago. Mostly north of Belle Fourche on the grass lands. I've been told that some SoDak ranchers are also using poison to kill the pd's off. It's legal in SoDak but not in NE, so some ranchers go to SD to buy poison and take it home.

However eastern montana and western NoDak look good for PD's again this year. So follow the train tracks from Miles City MT to Bowman ND and you will have good shooting. MT requires a 10 dollar small game license (good for a year) to shoot on state or public owned land. No license needed on private or reservation land.

There is lots of public land in Montana in that area. There are also guides for that area. First thing though, know, I mean KNOW, whether or not you are on public land or private land. The OnX gps chips and a good atlas are a requirement. I mean an atlas that list in color private and public lands. Delorme makes a good one.

Unscrupulous guides have been known to fib about having an exclusive hunting lease on state lands to people. Ask the state game wardens, no such things exist. Shooting benches are legal, putting that bench in the back of a pickup, or trailer means its in a vehicle and now its shooting from a vehicle. That's illegal. There is a guide in southeast MT, this area, that has a bench bolted into the back of his toyota pickup. Wyoming game wardens ruined his day a few years ago.
 
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