First elk hunt. Leaning toward Tikka

montana west

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now that you have al the advice in the world you are confused One advisor gave you the best advice if you go to a magnum 30/06 recoil 20#s 7mm mag 21# and 300 win 25# Thus the 7mm mag in a syn stock will have less felt recoil than a 30/06 in a wood stock.... a 300.00 rifle including the 3x9 simmons scope . thus a 7mm mag will shtto with all the magnums becaus of the velocity and their bullet have high B Cs
 

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Wolf76

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Had the opposite situation with a guide a couple years back. He said be able to shoot 2-3 hundred yards comfortably. Turns out 4-5 hundred yards shots were fairly common. My group was proficient to 500 with lots of trigger time and load development. We all shot good bulls and had fun with the pursuit.
We brought (2) 308s and (1)300 wm. The 300 took 2 elk and laid them down with authority. The 308 took a dandy 6x6 at 403 yards, but the bull traveled 60 yards. The elk's reaction to the hits was noticeably different between the 2 cartridges. All similar shots and all using Bergers.
I can say the 06 is probably decent to 400-450. After that there are better options.
I'm not looking for adequate or can get the job done. I'm looking for optimal. If you can shoot it, the 300 + 215 Berger seems optimal from my experience. Still trying to figure if something can be "too dead".
IMO magnums should weigh 8.5-10# finished. Try the gun bearer sling, it makes carrying a gun so much easier.
 

rbTanzan

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IMO magnums should weigh 8.5-10# finished.
Sometimes it helps to get wider perspectives.
In my opinion everything from a 270/7mm through the 300's (308Win, 300WM, etc), 338WM, 35 Whelen, 9.3x62 are good, all around, medium caliber hunting rounds. The 375Ruger and 375H&H are in a marginal zone. Magnums start with the 416's. Recoil can be re-assuring. But since this is the Long Range Forum I do see extra value in sending a particular caliber's bullets a little faster than for normal hunting. People like to call them magnums but the same bullets do the work. The 30-06, 300WM, and 300PRC all send out the same bullets.

Anyway, if caliber size is new, you might try shooting some 375's and 458's. Then the difference between a 7mm and a 300 will not relate to bigness and you can concentrate on whichever rifle and bullets you want to hunt with.
 

Slibey

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06 is just fine for those ranges. Have a 7mag great gun, but if you get one get a fast twist for heavies, mine is ten twist and it won’t stabiles 168 Berger’s.
 

fremont

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Your outfitter is trying to tell you something, i.e., Get ready for a long poke. I wish I had a dollar for everytime an outfitter says "Yeah, zero your rifle at 200....maybe 250" then, when you get there, the 22 year old guide asks if you're comfortable shooting out to 500. Take a real hard look at magnums that have 1500+ ft. lbs energy at the distances the outfitter is saying, i.e., 500 yards. I'd look personally investigate a Tikka T3 Lite (I like the SS model) in either a 270 WSM or a 300 WSM. I think leaving the 30-06 either at home or as a backup is the right call.
 

CMDR Kibo

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@adiredneck

OP, I don't see where you mention the elevation(s) you are likely to be hunting at. That makes a difference in the stability of your bullet.

I did some quick calculations using sea level and 4,000 feet and up for elevations. According to Berger's calculator, their 175 gr Elite Hunter in a 9.5 twist barrel has marginal stability at sea level but is stable from about 4,000 ft of elevation on up. So if you want to stick with a 175 gr bullet in the 7RM, keep that in mind or consider using a 160 gr class of bullet.

In the 7RM, my go to bullet is the 160 gr A-frame for Elk and Muleys out to 500 yards. I've always had great success with this bullet and never felt the need for a higher BC bullet until I get beyond 500 yards. Frankly, my experience is that it flat out drops them right where they stand.

Personally, I have hunted Elk and Mule deer in the Rockies extensively with a 7RM in two different lightweight rifles. Don't worry about the recoil. As you probably know, one or two shots on fur and you won't even notice the recoil. It's not like you are shooting a 60+ round count course of fire with this rifle.

As far as Tikka is concerned, I give them two big thumbs up. One of the best choices there is for a factory rifle.
 
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Maol

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I also have a savage 116 in 30-06 that I rarely ever use. Never shot anything with it. Another option would be to swap out the bolt face and screw a new custom barrel on it. I bought it with the intention of doing a barrel swap some day

The lightweight stock options really start to open up when you consider the remington 700. New bare actions aren’t bad priced. I could probably go all in with a new Remage barrel. Maybe 7mm-300 winchester or 7mm Weatherby...

I reload everything so I can practice a lot.
Maybe swap boltheads, rebarrel the 116 30-06 with a 300 PRC from Proof Research with a brake, go with a Timney trigger then you could put it in a Manners Elite Hunter CF stock. It's a Savage, you could do it yourself in under a sixpack.

That gives you a Magnum, plus it puts the unused 116 to work as you originally intended and you can tell the wife 'nope I didn't buy a new one, just fixed up a old one '...
 

Catskills

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Your outfitter is trying to tell you something, i.e., Get ready for a long poke. I wish I had a dollar for everytime an outfitter says "Yeah, zero your rifle at 200....maybe 250" then, when you get there, the 22 year old guide asks if you're comfortable shooting out to 500. Take a real hard look at magnums that have 1500+ ft. lbs energy at the distances the outfitter is saying, i.e., 500 yards. I'd look personally investigate a Tikka T3 Lite (I like the SS model) in either a 270 WSM or a 300 WSM. I think leaving the 30-06 either at home or as a backup is the right call.
I’ve become a huge fan of the 270wsm. It’s become my favorite deer caliber. After seeing how deep 140 accubonds at 3200fps penetrate, I wouldn’t hesitate to use as an occasional elk rifle. In a lightweight rifle ( without a muzzle break), it is the upper limit of muzzle jump that will still allow you see impact. Would it be an ideal single purpose elk rife? IMO, that starts with .338 bullets:). Would it be a step up for elk over heavy loads in an 06? It would shoot flatter while providing more than sufficient penetration with premium bullets. As an all around rifle, I think a T3x would be hard to beat.
 

Goldengun

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Just use your 30-06, it's more than enough cartridge, and it aint about the cartridge/gun. If your gonna step up, then step up! Get a .338 or larger. If your rich, heck buy'em all.
 

Wolf76

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Grandville, Michigan
Sometimes it helps to get wider perspectives.
In my opinion everything from a 270/7mm through the 300's (308Win, 300WM, etc), 338WM, 35 Whelen, 9.3x62 are good, all around, medium caliber hunting rounds. The 375Ruger and 375H&H are in a marginal zone. Magnums start with the 416's. Recoil can be re-assuring. But since this is the Long Range Forum I do see extra value in sending a particular caliber's bullets a little faster than for normal hunting. People like to call them magnums but the same bullets do the work. The 30-06, 300WM, and 300PRC all send out the same bullets.

Anyway, if caliber size is new, you might try shooting some 375's and 458's. Then the difference between a 7mm and a 300 will not relate to bigness and you can concentrate on whichever rifle and bullets you want to hunt with.
I understand your perspective. I think many would call the calibers you referenced super magnums. Things that require on oversized bolt, action, BF, uncommon parts, etc.
Given the standard action cartridges 308, 06, 6.5 CM, 270, etc - most people accept magnums to be 300 wm, 7mm, 300 PRC, 338 wm - with the upper end being 338 Lapua/edge.
Jumping into the cheytac, bmg, and dangerous game rifles is a different arena. The first 2 are discussed often in the ELR forum and not nearly as often in the long range forum. Also note this group of guns is often far heavier and less practical than most hunting rifles.
You could make a feasible argument that magnums start with 70grs of powder. But that's a another discussion.
Since the OP is talking elk, Broz has noted in many forums that the 7mm has not been as effective as the 300, despite what the paper ballistics suggests. He is well respected and can't explain 'why' there is a noticeable difference. I don't have anywhere near the experience he does with elk. I can only discuss my experience with a 300 wm + 215 Berger loaded @2875 fps does to elk (leaves them very dead).

Although I've only been hunting 30 years, I've never seen "too dead".

Feel free to PM me if you'd like to discuss this more. I don't wish to side track this thread.
 

montana west

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stryker montana
a 7mm mag in a tikka or weatherby vanguard syn stocks and a nosler 160 accubond is best fo all bullets for long range and the nosler partition is second best and the truth is ther are no real better bullet in the world only on challengerl that being the Serria 160 Gameking..... and your regular 9.125 or 9.5 twist will be just fine.
 

Korhil78

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now that you have al the advice in the world you are confused One advisor gave you the best advice if you go to a magnum 30/06 recoil 20#s 7mm mag 21# and 300 win 25# Thus the 7mm mag in a syn stock will have less felt recoil than a 30/06 in a wood stock.... a 300.00 rifle including the 3x9 simmons scope . thus a 7mm mag will shtto with all the magnums becaus of the velocity and their bullet have high B Cs
You lost me at Simmons scope.
 

rustyshackleford

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North Alabama
That's a good looking load! Have you ever shot an elk at both ends of that range it? I'm wondering how that bullet does at those speed ranges

I decided to go with a 180gr Speer hot cor for my Tikka '06. From what I've read, as long as speeds are under 2800fps it performs fantastically in elk.
Not yet. Probably gonna have to wait till next year now. I don’t really anticipate any problems though since from muzzle to 500 it’ll be under 2700 ft/sec and over 2k ft/sec. With those speeds and the sectional density it should be cake for that bullet.
 

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