First big game bow kill ?

Discussion in 'Bowhunting' started by 5.56×250, Nov 28, 2019.


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  1. 5.56×250

    5.56×250 Well-Known Member

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    May 16, 2019
    Things have wound down here in Ga, with the rut tailing off . Another year without a buck worthy of my bragging wall, at least so far.
    Sitting here, I started thinking about the excitement around taking a big game animal with a stick and string . Those days are behind me now . Degenerative disc disease has taken my bow hunting lifestyle away from me. I still have the memories of success in the field and in competitions around the country and I guess that will have to do.
    All this brings me to the subject of this thread. First bowkill . Tell us about your first nerve racked, heart pounding, close quarters harvest ....
     
  2. 5.56×250

    5.56×250 Well-Known Member

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    May 16, 2019
    I will get us started. My first bowkill was a big mature whitetail doe . My bowhunting career had started with several clean misses . Missed a 20" ten point the first hour of the first bowhunting trip ever !
    Anyway , on this hunt, I was hunting with a friend who was very accomplished as a bow hunter. We were on his aunt's 50 acre old family cattle farm that had long since gone back to the wild side. I had scouted and picked a spot on a creek that had a few early season water oak acorns falling and a good bit of deer sign. I actually sat in the creek on a rock . My arrow would clear the bank if I kept good posture when an opportunity would present itself . Maybe 45 minutes into the hunt a big doe and a couple yearlings came in and started feeding on the acorns. I decided i would take the doe since the yearlings seemed capable of feinding for themselves . I waited for a good shot opportunity while trying to avoid 3 sets of eyes at 15 yards on the ground. Finally momma stepped behind one of the big oaks and gave me the opportunity to draw . I almost got to full draw when her head popped out from behind the tree. She cold busted me and I sat at 3/4 draw on the 70# XI Miles Keller compound as she bobbed her head up and down, trying to figure out what was moving around in the creek. She turned her head long enough for me to get to full draw , but her body was still obscured by the big oak. She stared at me for what seemed like 5 minutes, but was probably closer to 45 seconds. She blew, stomped her foot, and made her final fatal mistake by taking two steps forward and looking to her yearlings. At this point I was a shaking, nervous wreck and stuck all my pins on her and punched the trigger. The arrow landed with a solid crack as the muzzy broke her spine and dropped her right there. I was so shook up that I emptied my 6 arrow quivee at her to finish the deal. 4 misses left me with one arrow to finish her suffering. I calmed myself and squeezed the first respectable shot of the evening. Clean double lung shot. She expired in seconds. I was 17 at the time, 37 years ago. I got control of the nerves over time , mainly through 3D competitions . The national level shoots really helped me to shoot through the nerves and make every shot count.
    What's your story ?
     
  3. Greyfox

    Greyfox Well-Known Member

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    Jan 21, 2008
    My first big game bow kill was a whitetail doe that I shot as a teen back in the 1960’s. I was raised in rural Western New Jersey proximate to the Appalachian Trail where game was plenty and bowhunters, very few. Myself and my buddies had been totally mesmerized watching the exploits of Fed Bear frequently featured on the Wide World of Sports on Sunday afternoons. I cut lawns, painted fences, and shoveled driveways, until I had enough money to buy a 45# Bear Grizzly recurve, a matched set of a dozen cedar arrows with broadheads/field tips, a quiver, and accessories. It took a full year to build up my muscles and master the instinctive shooting technique. I worked feverishly building the skills to stalk/still hunt or build a ground blind to get within bow range of a whitetail. Tree stands were not common practice in those days. No luck the first season, but success was in sight. By the second season, I felt prepared. On the opener, on a Monday, after school I rushed to my chosen spot, a wooded area with a well worn trail, trail bordering an open brush field. The wind was perfect and the wet leaves made for quiet still hunting. Within a half hour a group of four does were moving across my direction towards the field. I also changed direction, hoping to get a shot if they went into the field to feed. As I approached the edge of the field they were already out there feeding at about 30-40 yards. One doe gave a perfect broadside shot. I drew thinking, ‘pick a spot, pick a spot!”. At the shot I heard a crack and the doe I shot at ran in back of brush pile. I waited about 20 minutes(seemed like 20 hours). I finally approached to the spot where she was standing and found lots of blood and half my Razorhead tipped cedar arrow. That was the crack! She was dead on the other side of the brush pile. She was center-shot through the heart with half the arrow fully penetrating. That was the first big game animal I had taken with either gun or bow. The memory will last forever as my greatest hunt, and the beginning of a life long passion.

    I still have that old Bear Grizzly that is over 50 years old, and in pristine condition. A work of art, and memories that will last forever!
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