Finer Points of Reloading

Reloading321

New Member
Joined
Oct 7, 2021
Messages
2
Location
MO
I would say I'm a fairly novice reloader. Been doing it for a couple years now strictly for hunting loads and recreational target shooting. Last night I was pulling some bullets from some loads I had worked up that got "lost" in a move but recently found and I have since changed brass brands. I noticed that some of the bullets pulled much easier than others so that got me thinking are there more advanced things I should be doing for consistency and brass life? I've never had any issues so to speak with my handloads but always looking to improve.Here is my typical process.

1. Tumble & Clean
2. Full Length Resize
3. Trim Necks
4. Debur Inside/Outside Necks
5. Uniform Flash Hole
6. Clean Primer Pocket
7. Seat Primers
8. Throw, Weigh, & Pour Charge
9. Seat Bullet

I'm using a single stage RCBS press with Hornady Custom Grade Dies for my 6.5CM and 300WM. Using RCBS Competition Grade Dies for my 7mm RM. Lapua brass on the 6.5CM and ADG brass on the 300WM and 7mm RM. Berger VLD and Hornady ELD-X bullets.

I set my dies up following manufacturer recommendations.

As I've been researching and reading online I have a few questions.

1. Neck sizing only, is that better than FL sizing?
2. Bumping the shoulder back .002"? Does the FL die do that or is that an additional step?
3. Neck tension, how do I make that more consistent?
4. Any other recommendations?

Thanks in advance.
There's nothing wrong with neck sizing. If you learn to do it properly it can be very accurate and and save you some trimming. It needs to be FL sized if you intend to shoot it in a different rifle. But it will be a tad tighter to chamber. Not for autos or anything but fine in bolt guns or single shots.
 

dfanonymous

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 16, 2016
Messages
1,524
How can neck sizing only be dangerous? I'm here to learn
It’s not generally.
Neck sizing eventually causes galling of the lugs. Probably the action too.

Depending what you do about that can effect headspace, and playing with headspace with zero knowledge can be dangerous.

So not a linear problem, but the potential is there. Hence why I said it could be.
 

Jud96

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 30, 2013
Messages
3,168
Location
Michigan
How many of you play with primer seating depth?
In my opinion, priming seating depth would be one of those things when you have everything else ironed out and you’re attempting to squeeze every ounce of raw precision and consistency from your ammo. I believe it’s not really applicable to 90% of shooters, simply because them and their rifles aren’t capable of seeing the difference on target. Again, it can’t hurt, but I don’t see it being worth investing in until you have reached the top tier of reloaders and shooters.
 

wolffo

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 18, 2013
Messages
72
I only trim/debur once on initial setup of new brass

the guy who initially taught me did zero brass prep
 

WKWRIGHT

Active Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Jun 14, 2016
Messages
39
Location
Dunnellon Florida
I would say I'm a fairly novice reloader. Been doing it for a couple years now strictly for hunting loads and recreational target shooting. Last night I was pulling some bullets from some loads I had worked up that got "lost" in a move but recently found and I have since changed brass brands. I noticed that some of the bullets pulled much easier than others so that got me thinking are there more advanced things I should be doing for consistency and brass life? I've never had any issues so to speak with my handloads but always looking to improve.Here is my typical process.

1. Tumble & Clean
2. Full Length Resize
3. Trim Necks
4. Debur Inside/Outside Necks
5. Uniform Flash Hole
6. Clean Primer Pocket
7. Seat Primers
8. Throw, Weigh, & Pour Charge
9. Seat Bullet

I'm using a single stage RCBS press with Hornady Custom Grade Dies for my 6.5CM and 300WM. Using RCBS Competition Grade Dies for my 7mm RM. Lapua brass on the 6.5CM and ADG brass on the 300WM and 7mm RM. Berger VLD and Hornady ELD-X bullets.

I set my dies up following manufacturer recommendations.

As I've been researching and reading online I have a few questions.

1. Neck sizing only, is that better than FL sizing?
2. Bumping the shoulder back .002"? Does the FL die do that or is that an additional step?
3. Neck tension, how do I make that more consistent?
4. Any other recommendations?

Thanks in advance.
I too have been down this road like many others on this site I am sure. What I found at the end of the day is, Keep it simple and my happiness improved by 500%. I used to chase perfection at every turn and it made me kinda nuts, now I full length resize and put away all my bushing dies for standard redding or RCBS dies and just do the basics, I do use the Lee factory crimp dies set to just barely apply pressure just for uniformity then I shoot them! To each their own I guess but you have to do what makes you happy, I personally got tired of all of the involved processes and wanted to get back to how it was when I started reloading, back when I enjoyed it.
 

Greyfox

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2008
Messages
5,902
Location
Northeast
The steps that ai pay particular attention to with high precision loads.
-Neck: I corn cob tumble fired brass after each firing to leave a thin carbon film on the inside of the neck. Size for an interior neck diameter .002-.003” under bullet diameter with a bushing or custom dye. Completed rounds are checked for run-out, <.002”.
-Sizing: I FL size to .002” shoulder headspace.
-Primer pockets cleaned with RCBS SS primer pocket cleaning brush.
-Powder change weighed to within .1gr.
-Bullet seating checked for .002” tolerance of BTO.
-I have generally not worried about annealing Lapua or Norma brass with less then 8-10 firings with hunting loads. In the case of my 6.5x47 Lapua used for competition, I’ve exceeded 20 firing without annealing.
The final test of reloads is for
Velocity/ES, Precision, and Zero specs.
 

coyote Dr

New Member
Joined
Oct 31, 2021
Messages
1
Location
mississippi
I would say I'm a fairly novice reloader. Been doing it for a couple years now strictly for hunting loads and recreational target shooting. Last night I was pulling some bullets from some loads I had worked up that got "lost" in a move but recently found and I have since changed brass brands. I noticed that some of the bullets pulled much easier than others so that got me thinking are there more advanced things I should be doing for consistency and brass life? I've never had any issues so to speak with my handloads but always looking to improve.Here is my typical process.

1. Tumble & Clean
2. Full Length Resize
3. Trim Necks
4. Debur Inside/Outside Necks
5. Uniform Flash Hole
6. Clean Primer Pocket
7. Seat Primers
8. Throw, Weigh, & Pour Charge
9. Seat Bullet

I'm using a single stage RCBS press with Hornady Custom Grade Dies for my 6.5CM and 300WM. Using RCBS Competition Grade Dies for my 7mm RM. Lapua brass on the 6.5CM and ADG brass on the 300WM and 7mm RM. Berger VLD and Hornady ELD-X bullets.

I set my dies up following manufacturer recommendations.

As I've been researching and reading online I have a few questions.

1. Neck sizing only, is that better than FL sizing?
2. Bumping the shoulder back .002"? Does the FL die do that or is that an additional step?
3. Neck tension, how do I make that more consistent?
4. Any other recommendations?

Thanks in advance.
Annealing is next
 

Wolf01

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 17, 2020
Messages
108
Location
Silver springs , Nv.
1.) Stick with FL sizing and add mandrel expanding the necks.
2.) Bump the shoulders .001-.003 but check the brass in your chamber to make sure it closes without resistance before settling on a particular bump. With the dies properly adjusted you’ll get the correct shoulder bump. Use a headspace comparator to find these numbers.
3.) Neck tension gets complicated and seems to be never ending. I would start by using the mandrel die to expand your necks after FL sizing and using premium brass to start.

4.) Your bullets most likely pulled harder because of cold welding of the necks. The copper jacket and brass case react to one another and will begin to corrode. There’s a technical term and description for this, but essentially they weld together. I’ve seen it happen. The only way to stop it is dry lube in the case necks or don’t leave your ammo sit for more than a month or so. I’m currently in the process of testing moly applied as a dry lube inside my case necks. I learned this from reading and watching videos on Lou Murdica’s process.

As far as other techniques. The rabbit hole is endless. I honestly am starting to take some things less seriously and focus more on myself as a shooter and making sure I’m consistent day in and day out. Having your powder weighed to the kernel or your ammunition have zero runout will not help you as a shooter, it won’t hurt either, until you’re able to shoot good enough to recognize those problems. However, there’s the psychological effect in that if you think a certain process/processes make you better and give you confidence, then keep doing that!

I like to advise people to add simple things to their process that won’t cost an extraordinary amount, but will help for sure. The number one thing is a mandrel die. Sinclair sells them for like $30 and you can buy the individual mandrels from them or others for roughly $15 each for stainless and around $50 each for carbide. The stainless is great but you have to lube the inside of the case necks to prevent gauling. I also would get a set of headspace and bullet comparators as well. I also like to run a nylon brush inside my case necks before charging the cases. It has been shown by reloaders much more skilled than me that it helps. Other than that, I would continue doing what you’re doing until you plateau or want to gain more consistency and/or precision. Learn everything inside and out then level up.

If you have deep pockets you can jump right into the most expensive and high tech equipment there is. You may never be able to take full advantage of it, but you’ll never have to question your equipment. There’s many paths to go down. I prefer to do the most I can with the best equipment I can afford. There’s some really good stuff out there that’s relatively affordable that can improve your ammo, save you time, and make reloading that much more enjoyable.

Sorry for being long winded. If you want me to explain more on what I use and what I recommend, or to explain more let me know. I can post it here in the thread or PM you if you’re interested.
Dissimilar metal corrosion can create galvanic corrosion. May fuse together but with gaping holes in molecular structure....ie rotten metal.
 

Rosebud

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Mar 12, 2021
Messages
292
Location
Anniston Alabama
I too have been down this road like many others on this site I am sure. What I found at the end of the day is, Keep it simple and my happiness improved by 500%. I used to chase perfection at every turn and it made me kinda nuts, now I full length resize and put away all my bushing dies for standard redding or RCBS dies and just do the basics, I do use the Lee factory crimp dies set to just barely apply pressure just for uniformity then I shoot them! To each their own I guess but you have to do what makes you happy, I personally got tired of all of the involved processes and wanted to get back to how it was when I started reloading, back when I enjoyed it.
Kiss is the way to go
 

Rosebud

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Mar 12, 2021
Messages
292
Location
Anniston Alabama
In my opinion, priming seating depth would be one of those things when you have everything else ironed out and you’re attempting to squeeze every ounce of raw precision and consistency from your ammo. I believe it’s not really applicable to 90% of shooters, simply because them and their rifles aren’t capable of seeing the difference on target. Again, it can’t hurt, but I don’t see it being worth investing in until you have reached the top tier of reloaders and shooters.
That's OCD to the max, seat them so the firing pin doesn't have to do it for you.
 

spladi

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 30, 2021
Messages
108
Location
USA
I would say I'm a fairly novice reloader. Been doing it for a couple years now strictly for hunting loads and recreational target shooting. Last night I was pulling some bullets from some loads I had worked up that got "lost" in a move but recently found and I have since changed brass brands. I noticed that some of the bullets pulled much easier than others so that got me thinking are there more advanced things I should be doing for consistency and brass life? I've never had any issues so to speak with my handloads but always looking to improve.Here is my typical process.

1. Tumble & Clean
2. Full Length Resize
3. Trim Necks
4. Debur Inside/Outside Necks
5. Uniform Flash Hole
6. Clean Primer Pocket
7. Seat Primers
8. Throw, Weigh, & Pour Charge
9. Seat Bullet

I'm using a single stage RCBS press with Hornady Custom Grade Dies for my 6.5CM and 300WM. Using RCBS Competition Grade Dies for my 7mm RM. Lapua brass on the 6.5CM and ADG brass on the 300WM and 7mm RM. Berger VLD and Hornady ELD-X bullets.

I set my dies up following manufacturer recommendations.

As I've been researching and reading online I have a few questions.

1. Neck sizing only, is that better than FL sizing?
2. Bumping the shoulder back .002"? Does the FL die do that or is that an additional step?
3. Neck tension, how do I make that more consistent?
4. Any other recommendations?

Thanks in advance.
I read several reply's, from others but did not see mention of neck turning inside and outside, this is a great accuracy asset along with what others have mentioned, otherwise measure unturned necks with a neck wall micrometer and sort them, .001" or less is good.
 
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