"Factory Crimp Die"

catamountsierra

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Apr 18, 2014
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Got a quick question. What would be considered a light, medium or heavy crimp?

I set mine to where I was just feeling some resistance at the bottom of the stroke. Measured about .002 smaller on case mouth from case neck. Any less than this and I couldn't really see any crimp on the neck mouth. So what would this be considered?

How much of a crimp have you guy's seen the best results with?

I haven't actually measured, but that is pretty much what I am trying to achieve. It works well for me.
 

tbrice23

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Dec 12, 2012
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I set up my die for a medium light crimp. I screw the die in until I feel it touch the loaded case neck then tighten about 3/4 to 5/8 more.
When it crimps I can just feel it lightly squeezing.
 

phorwath

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I crimped to 3 test depths. All improved precision. The heaviest crimp delivered the best improvement. All three crimp levels improved precision, compared to no crimp. Heaviest crimp the most. My .224 bullets were reduced ~0.002" in diameter. Crimp. Pull bullet. Measure bullet diameter at crimp, if you want to put a number to it.

Otherwise, you'll feel a little resistance on the press handle, and also see the crimp on the case neck.

Or follow Lee's Instructions! And go shoot'em...
 

WildRose

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I set up my die for a medium light crimp. I screw the die in until I feel it touch the loaded case neck then tighten about 3/4 to 5/8 more.
When it crimps I can just feel it lightly squeezing.
Fairly similar to what I'm doing with ABLR's and ELDX's. I'm using a tighter crimp on the Peregrines because I'm using the relief grooves as though they were crimping grooves.

I have yet to try this on any rifle that I haven't seen a considerable tightening of groups.
 

Lonewolf74

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May 12, 2016
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WildRose I bought the Lee die set for reloading my 45-70 because I couldn't find anything that I thought would be any better. And to be honest I'm impressed with the fit and finish.

Anyway would you recommend the fcd over using the crimp in the seater die?

Do you think you get improved accuracy with the fcd over a typical crimp built into the seating die?
 

gohring3006

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I'm not Wildrose but I'll offer a opinion.
The roll crimp in the seating die is so sensitive to case length to get the same crimp on each bullet, that even slight differences in case head thickness affects the crimp. So even carefully trimming each case the same length doesn't always give good results. The LFC die will crimp a consistent crimp with out all the sensitivity.
 

Lonewolf74

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May 12, 2016
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Gohring that makes since to me, I was gonna just order the fcd right off the bat cus I just like being able to set my seating and crimp in 2 different steps. None of my other die sets have the crimp built into the seating die and I like it that way but I couldn't find any dies like that for 45-70. So I decided to give the set I got a shot before getting a fcd and see how the seating/crimp comes out.
 

phorwath

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I found this Post at The Firing Line Forum, at the below linked web address, in case anyone has the interest. The below "quote" is not mine. But my more limited experience crimping reloaded ammo has been the same. Certainly, anyone that does limited load development would improve their accuracy by adding a crimp, IMO. For LRH's that work harder at developing an optimum accuracy load, I dunno if the Lee Collet Factory Crimp Die (LFCD) will improve or degrade accuracy notably. I have never tested thoroughly enough to know, and never will. But it absolutely improved accuracy in my 223 ammo from my AR 15. An unmistakable improvement with loads that I didn't spend a lot of time developing. I like to crimp my AR 15 .223 ammo, no matter the accuracy improvements or detriments. That's how I came to testing the LFCD in the first place. Crimping my .223 handloads for my AR 15. I shot non-crimped loads and LFCD crimped loads. Same load. Only difference was the LFCD crimping. Big improvement in accuracy. Again, the below is NOT my text. An old codger (like me) from The Firing Line posted this. I don't know him at all. But if he's 1/2 honest, he's improved accuracy across the board with his reloaded ammo by crimping with the LFCD.

https://thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=168799

"To put your minds at ease, I have loaded thousands of non-cannalured bullets using the Lee Factory Crimp Dies. I shoot a thousand rounds a month (I am old and have nothing better to do) and have tried every bullet and powder combination in .22 Hornet, .223, .243, 7x57, .308, .30-06, 45-70, .270W, 280R, 300WSM, 7mmWSM, 30-40 Krag, 32W, 30-30, 264WM and a few others. AS an example, I loaded 20 bullets, ten crimped and ten not. In every case except one, the crimped bullets using the FCD improved the accuracy of the rifle.....I have shot many Speer bullets using the FCD. No problems at all and very accurate.......For the 45-70 and a lot of good shooting.......use the Remington bulk 300 grain from Midwayusa......for real power....the 405 grain Rem flatpoint."
 

kai

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Nov 27, 2016
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This is interesting to see this thread revived.
I wonder if Steve at Hammer bullets or anyone else has more recent results on LFC.
 

oldfortyfiveauto

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Jan 20, 2011
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Another interesting use for the FCD is to straighten out a belled case. I shoot a lot of cast bullet loads for practice. I bell the necks a little so the bullets will seat without shaving. Then I use the FCD to bring the bell back in and straighten the case neck. It does a nicer job than using the seater die crimp.
 
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