Elk Rifle Input Needed

HunterMann

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I favor a 338 WM that I shoot very well, but your 270 will work just fine. Maybe upgrade your bullet choice for elk as mentioned above. You didn't mention your common shooting distance, but for the mountains you may want to upgrade your scope. There is a lot of greatly improved scope options available today.
 

Lnewton

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Randy Newberger hunts Elk with a .308. I know many people do as well. I have two friends that use a .270 and you will always be able to find ammo for 30-06 or 300 WM since you dont reload. All of these are great calibers regardless of brand. If you want a rifle that doesn’t need work, get any of these in some form of Remington model 700 and get a good vortex Viper and go to the mountains.
 

Lnewton

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Another one to mention, I didn't read all the replies but the new 6.8 western cartridge is readily available most places and is quite a round from what I have read.
 

Old rooster

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I live in elk country and can hunt 30-40 minutes from my house.I use a 300 win mag.
Wolf76 said it best when he said you can find ammo for several cartridges including 30-06 and 300 win mag in most stores.
I reload and have been a re-loader since 1967 but I have many friends that do not reload and all shoot main line calibers like 270,308,30-06,300 win mag and some shoot the 300 WSM and I don't think an elk or huge muley would know the difference between 300 WM and 300 WSM as both are like lightening bolts to them.I have seen the same amount of 300 WSM ammo here as 300 WM but have not seen any PRC ammo on any store shelf so if you don't reload you would have problems with finding loaded ammo here.
Just my opinion
 

COBrad

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I too live in elk country. I shot my cow this year about 15 minutes from my house. Also guided elk hunters for 38 years. Unless you’re willing to burn up a good bit of ammo I would not suggest a 30 caliber magnum of any flavor. Recoil is on a whole different level than your .270. It takes most guys a fair bit of practice to master the recoil of the magnums, and even then your real benefit is range more than any real advantage in killing power until you start shooting out around 500 yards. The 270 is a fine elk rifle.
 

Silent Hammer

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270 with 150ABLR is good to go to 500 yards if you need. Ballistics pretty close to 7RM.
That's more than enough oomph!
 

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asd9055

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I took my elk with a 30.06 shooting 180 grns. About 280 yards. Next time I will be taking one of the 300s or 338s. I reload so its not a problem for me. My rifles have brakes so recoil is not a problem either.
You don't reload, and you might be sensitive to recoil, so 270, 30.06 or 300WM with a good brake would be my suggestions to you. They are probably the easiest ammo to find even in difficult times.
Spend some money and a get a good scope...and practice...practice...practice..
 

Frank in the Laurels

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Dollar for dollar, inch by inch, the plain Jane ugly T/C Compass at under $300.00 in .300 win mag will do everything any of the others will do for basically nothing, comparatively speaking...great shooters also..
 

isaaccarlson

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'Caliber' is something that hangs a lot of folks up and can be confusing.

There is bullet diameter and speed. Put more powder behind a bullet and it goes faster.

Decide how far you want to shoot and then decide what diameter bullet and how fast you want it to go for that range. It's too easy to get caught up in the new stuff and marketing, but all you need is an accurate rifle and good skills and you can get a lot done.

I'm with 26Reload on this.

I would call a .270 or even a .243 plenty of gun for mountain game. A friend of mine has hunted all over the world with his Winchester 100 in 308. He has all kinds of critters in his house. A tiger, grizz, dahl sheep, all kinds of deer, you name it. He is old and doesn't hunt much anymore. He'll tell you how far a 308 will kill big critters, and it's a lot further than even I thought. He never used a fancy reticle or balistic software, he just shot. He got a big whitetail last year and the shot was a feat for someone in his 80's. The buck was chasing a doe and took off running through the woods. That man drilled the buck through the heart and both shoulders and dumped him on the ground with only a second or two available to make the shot. He says the 308 is a bit much for most game, but it's what his favorite gun is chambered in.

Bigger calibers are preached like gospel, but in most cases they are overkill and not needed. People have been shooting big game for years with everything from .224 to 30-06. When I was younger the 30-06 was big medicine for anything you could hunt and anything bigger was exotic. Now the advertised standard is 300 mag or 338 or even 50 bmg and I don't understand why. If you need a bigger gun to increase the chance of a kill, you need to get better at shooting. It won't be long before 20mm is the new big game standard.

If the 270 is too heavy, get a lighter stock and head out.
 

Aoudad shooter1975

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Winchester 100…humm if he hunted with it all over the world I would have been surprised—it maybe a favorite around home and the states but abroad?when my father hunted abroad in the 60s-70s most countries banned the use of simi automatic firearms—even for hunting purposes (my dad would be his age—my father would be 88 this year…I know most African and Asian countries sure frown on simi automatic weapons today and especially in military calibers. I agree with you on using what you know—but will say—if you travel a long way, and there is a trophy, bull, billy, buck or ram on a far side side of a canyon,you are on the last day of a hunt, the light is fading, and the wind is whipping. Having a little extra bullet and velocity—and knowing your firearm (practice) make all the difference.
 

MTMike

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While I am new to elk hunting, I've taken 4 cows now in MT with a 6.5PRC and a 1.5*8 by42 scope as far as 286 yards. Each shot was properly place and they went about 15-20 yards and expired. Used Hornady 143 grain hunting round. The scope allows longer distance shooting and spot and stalk in the woods. I too think your 270 will get the job done without any trouble - maybe a new lightweight stock?
 

Frank in the Laurels

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Save your hard earned cash, no need to spend it for nothing, a good old T/C Compass in .300wm will handle anything you can hit with no problem, great little shooters for nothing comparatively speaking..$300.00, beat that..
 

FEENIX

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What are your thoughts on 300 recoil? I was watching a Randy Newberg video and he shoots a 308 and mentioned not shooting a 308 and not having a muzzle brake.
A muzzle brake is not for everybody. I have three .300 WMs. I started using muzzle brakes in 2003 and never looked back. I am not recoil sensitive, but most of my rifles have a muzzle brake. A well-designed muzzle brake has two purposes; reduction of felt recoil and reduction of muzzle rise. The latter is often not realized. You mentioned you do not want to limit range, but the difference between the .300 WM and the .308 Win is significant - depending on source data, the .300 WM has a 36g of H20 advantage. I have no hands experience with this particular muzzle brake but check out this video.


With a $2K budget, you can also build a semi-custom rifle set-up.
 
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asd9055

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A muzzle brake is not for everybody. I have three .300 WMs. I started using muzzle brakes in 2003 and never looked back. I am not recoil sensitive, but most of my rifles have a muzzle brake. A well-designed muzzle brake has two purposes; reduction of felt recoil and reduction of muzzle rise. The latter is often not realized. You mentioned you do not want to limit range, but the difference between the .300 WM and the .308 Win is significant - depending on source data, the .300 WM has a 36g of H20 advantage. I have no hands experience with this particular muzzle brake but check out this video.


With a $2K budget, you can also build a semi-custom rifle set-up.
I am with you Ed. Only one of my hunting rifles does not have a brake that is because it is 60 years old and keeping it factory original. Even my 22-250 has a brake...
 
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