Donuts, will they always hinder accuracy?

Far North Hunter

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Yeah, keep looking for it in bullet seating "feel" and if your getting velocity issues. Reaming and turning fixed my issues, maybe not yours. I just prefer to uniform my neck walls so the Redding FL bushing dies have a predictable neck tension. Good luck!
 

lyle2231

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I see what you're saying. It makes good sense. Right now, the donut has an opening that's greater than .261 but smaller than .263, so say it's .262. I've got Lee making a Collet die and the mandrel should end up @ .261. Assuming .001" spring back, the Collet die should leave the sized neck at about .262" The donut may not be quite as much of an issue as I thought but I will see. If that doesn't work, I will take your advice and pre expand with a .263 or larger mandrel & partial neck size above the donut area if need be. If the donut it still there, I think I will be able to feel it in seating the bullet.
Because of the length of the bullet Could it be bottoming out against the powder charge?
 

lgordee

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Jul 10, 2012
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It has been mentioned previously but worth repeating, when turning your necks for brass prep on virgin brass, cutting lightly into the shoulder with the correct angle cutter will often eliminate the donut issue. Donuts can be dangerous from the standpoint of working up to a load on the hot side with virgin brass and then loading into a donut with that same load can significantly raise pressure. If you are satisfied that the longer bullets are what you want to run in your rifle, why not purchase a "throating" tool from PTG and extend the throat so that you don't need to seat into the donut? Problem solved.
 

IHFarmer07

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Dec 29, 2013
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It has been mentioned previously but worth repeating, when turning your necks for brass prep on virgin brass, cutting lightly into the shoulder with the correct angle cutter will often eliminate the donut issue. Donuts can be dangerous from the standpoint of working up to a load on the hot side with virgin brass and then loading into a donut with that same load can significantly raise pressure. If you are satisfied that the longer bullets are what you want to run in your rifle, why not purchase a "throating" tool from PTG and extend the throat so that you don't need to seat into the donut? Problem solved.
Yes, “problem solved”, but not everyone shoots the same bullets or sticks with only one bullet. Some are restricted to a certain mag length for a certain action size/length for their rifle. That won’t work in all cases.

With my 6.5prc, most all bullets I’ve been shooting I can touch the lands and still be with in mag length with my BH short action, with the Berger 156’s I can’t get close and still be at mag length.
 

lgordee

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Yes, “problem solved”, but not everyone shoots the same bullets or sticks with only one bullet. Some are restricted to a certain mag length for a certain action size/length for their rifle. That won’t work in all cases.

With my 6.5prc, most all bullets I’ve been shooting I can touch the lands and still be with in mag length with my BH short action, with the Berger 156’s I can’t get close and still be at mag length.
Understood, however I wasn't talking everyone and all cases. I was talking one man and one bullet. Some aren't aware of a throating reamer. I was offering another option/solution.
 

IHFarmer07

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Understood, however I wasn't talking everyone and all cases. I was talking one man and one bullet. Some aren't aware of a throating reamer. I was offering another option/solution.
Yeah I seen that. Some people can actually choose one bullet and leave it alone unlike me lol.

It’s a great idea for those that stick to building a rifle around one bullet!
 

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