does the focus on optics correct for vision?

middleofnowhere

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Jun 26, 2016
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Yucca Valley, CA
I am new to needing glasses, have had perfect vision my whole life until just before the 2016 season.
I wear progressive lenses for indoor and night use and have prescription sun glasses for distance only outdoors.

I have not been able to shoot with my prescription glasses, it seems extremely uncomfortable and awkward for me. It seems that when I focus my scope or binos that I am able to see crystal clear without glasses. I hear about people talking about eye relief for glasses, etc. Also people mention which eyecups are better for glasses, etc.

My question is if I am really able to correct my vision with nothing but the focus of the optic? If this is the case, why do they make adjustable eyecups and relief for glasses wearers?
 

Barrelnut

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Dec 16, 2013
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End of the Oregon Trail
Welcome to the world of the Magoos. I had good vision until about 45 years of age or so. Now have been a bifocal wearer for years. And have used them hunting shooting and glassing for years too.

One of the main reasons for the downturn cups on binos and stuff it that it is a pain in the a** to keep taking your glasses on and off just to look thru an optic. (ya don't want to forget and leave them on the ground.) Also, when long range shooting, you need to look thru the scope and then be able to look at the small print on a turret to adjust it and back and forth.

I'm used to wearing glasses now. It feels weird not to have them on. Such is life I guess.

I think you will get used to keeping them on when looking thru a scope and binos. It will become second nature.

Also, correcting you vision with the parallax adjustment, might be an issue itself, since the parallax adjustment is meant to put the target image and the reticle on the same focal plane. that is not quite the same as focusing the image so you can see it better.

I see no issues with using the ocular ring to focus the reticle though. For me it just gets to be a pain to keep taking my glasses on and off.

You might want of get a set of prescription glasses for shooting. You need eye protection anyways and I think just prescription sunglass for outdoors could get to be a problem.
 

Timnterra

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Oct 18, 2012
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Rapid City SD
I don’t like wearing glass either, especially while shooting prone! However, I wear contacts most of the time unless I get something in my eye. My vision is too bad to bother trying to shoot without glasses; I’d just have to put them right back on as soon as I looked outside the scope. If you can get by without the glasses in most situations I don’t see a problem focusing the scope to your eye. I have a friend who has recently been forced to wear bifocals as a red he has a had a hard time shooting, he used to be able to have the target and reticle in focus at the same time, but with bifocals he had to look up to see the reticle and down to see the target... Until he stated focusing the reticle to the vision through the top lense on the bifocals.
 

26Reload

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A lot of vision confusion comes from not lining up square to scope with glasses....
First...most glass makers have cut corners by not making the whole lenses to correct your vision...your lenses may be a front focal lenses only allowing you to see straight ahead..
Second....when shooting lots of people use the slightly across the bridge of the nose view..which makes a person look through non visual parts of the lenses....distorting the view....
So one of two corrections will work...get full view(one vision) lenses for shooting...or line up straight behind the scope....
I line up straighter..my wife uses single vision lenses....and my son uses single vision and lines up straighter....maybe that's why he is close to outshooting me these days.....
I have tri-focal lenses....and need them unfortunately...
 

middleofnowhere

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Jun 26, 2016
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Yucca Valley, CA
I’m supposed to go in for an eye check-up soon, I’ll see about single vision lenses just for shooting.
These progessives just don’t seem to work well.
I seem to see fine through the scope and the numbers on the turret are blurry.
 

26Reload

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While visiting modernmuzzloading there were guys discussing this same topic....one guy said for shooting that he wore only reader glasses...not the prescription he normally wore...which if you stop to think about it is really what a person shoot figure out if it works for him-her self....
Through a scope...you are bringing the picture to the scope...not vice versa...
So short distance glasses should actually be what you would want...
But then the problem of a second pair to put on after you shoot...
I see it this way...if target shooting..readers.....if hunting..better have prescriptions on.....
 

Lpart

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Jun 28, 2010
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339
Location
Powell, Wyoming
I have gone thru the same set of issues. Good vision for years, then it goes. Had the laser eye surgery and that helped for several years and then age brought along the need for bifocals to be able to read etc. 4 or 5 years ago I stumbled across an optician in I think it was Kansas City that specialized in shooting glasses. He even made glasses for the handgunners with the bifocal pane on top. At any rate I had him make me a pair and they have been incredible. I got the Wiley X (indestructible and used by the Seals) Romer frame and coated safety lenses with an orange color and the resolution is amazing. No polarized lenses for shooters! I got my prescription locally and told the optician I wanted the upper main portion the glasses to correct my vision to 20-15. My vision is better with these glasses than my normal everyday glasses. I need a prescription change in my everyday glasses but these shooting glasses are still going strong (sometimes I feel like I can see a flea on an elk's *** at 1,000 yards). I can no longer find by address for this optician but the following link appears to be similar. I think you can talk with them and fine tune just what you want for about $350. I am keeping this link as my lenses are beginning to get scratched up and I may need to replace the lens.
https://www.sportrx.com/shopby/best_sports-shooting/brand-wiley_x.html
 

ShtrRdy

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Jan 14, 2012
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High Plains
I tried progressive lenses a couple different times when I needed vision correction and in the end settled on bifocals. For shooting I have trifocals that have worked great.
 

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