Die Selection 300 WSM ???

USAF Marksman

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2013
Messages
153
Just bought a Tikka T3 in 300 WSM. I'm PCSing out to Utah and wanted to step up just a little from my 270 Win. I am about to pull the trigger on a set of dies (looking at the Redding Master Hunter or RCBS Gold Medal Match) and I've got a few questions.

I've never used a die with a bushing before, just plain Jane RCBS two die sets. This is just going to be a hunting rifle, nothing past 500 yards. Won't be a range queen or anything. Is spending the money on a set of bushing dies worth the extra dough? Or should I stick with basic dies? Also, would it be worth getting a set of dies with a micrometer adjustment? Or is that more of a luxury? I've got good calipers and a comparator set for measuring my COAL and such.

Not expecting to put 5 bullets through one hole, as I know I am not capable of that. However, I am expecting good Sub-MOA out of this Tikka. I'll spend the money if it's really worth it for what I am going to be doing. Looking for some opinions I suppose.

Thanks,
Tucker
 

elf

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 26, 2017
Messages
262
You don't need bushing dies for purely hunting useage. Today, most dies are of hunting quality. Take a look at the
Forester and Hornady also.
 

Doc88

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 21, 2016
Messages
559
Location
Florence, SC
The more you reload the more you will want to improve your reloads. I use Redding Type S bushing full length sizer dies and Competition Seater die sets for all calibers including 300 WSM. Are they absolutely necessary for hunting rounds? Prolly not. Do I get .5 MOA or less ammunition? Yes. When I first got into reloading I looked at all the die options out there. My goal was and still is minimal runout, consistent ammunition and I'm able to achieve that with these dies. Good luck and if I can be of any assistance let me know.
 

tbrice23

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2012
Messages
3,077
Location
Indiana
I might catch some grief for saying this buy Lee makes die sets that produce very low run out, and gets you perfect neck tension, (close to .002" in most cases).
No they're not made from Ti carbide unobtanium but if you wear one out you haven't lost $150.
I've never worn one out.
 

DUSTY NOGGIN

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2015
Messages
655
Location
salt lake city
if you pick up a neck turning tool and a 30 caliber pilot, it will help you will see the biggest differences in brass , those differences will determine what die set you will help you the most ,

if the brass that you already have is thick at the case neck ,
any regular die and a neck turning tool -- because you can trim down to the regular die measurements to get equal neck tension

if the brass you have is thin , or inconsistent so much that you need to turn down the neck wall ( that it will be thin ), then i would go with a bushing die set , with a few smaller ID bushings

** the point of the bushing dies is to have an adjustable neck sizing possibility ** unless you are neck turning off the inconsistencies of your brass , a bushing die really wont help you any differently than a regular die would

if you really like tinkering , you may as well get the pilots for the neck turning tool to fit your other calibers... Because once you see how bad some brass is, you will turn everything just to true it up.
but on the other hand , if you just wanna load up some bullets and not get too deep, then id go with the cheapest option , like stated above the lee would be a cheap good option
 
Last edited:

brentc

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 3, 2009
Messages
2,494
I use the Redding Premium Die Set to make straight high precision ammunition for my 300 WSM.

I think the Master Hunter set would be a fantastic choice. No bushing die needed.
 

wboregon

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2017
Messages
124
I've heard great things about redding dies. Personally I ended up getting a whidden FL bushing resizer. pretty neat die, just make sure to NOT screw it all the way to the shell plate per their instructions, start high and slowly screw it in and check your brass with a shoulder bump gauge each time, once you see that all the neck is sized and that contact has been made with the shoulder you should be good to go.
 

tbrice23

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2012
Messages
3,077
Location
Indiana
I've heard great things about redding dies. Personally I ended up getting a whidden FL bushing resizer. pretty neat die, just make sure to NOT screw it all the way to the shell plate per their instructions, start high and slowly screw it in and check your brass with a shoulder bump gauge each time, once you see that all the neck is sized and that contact has been made with the shoulder you should be good to go.
This is definitely Not unique to Whidden dies.
Every FL die should be set up this way yet all manufacturers instructions say screw it all the way to the shell holder... ridiculous.
 

bigedp51

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2010
Messages
1,022
  • Full length resizing dies are designed to push the case shoulder back to fit in any chamber. Meaning sized to fit in minimum SAAMI headspaced chambers. The Whidden die has a shorter die body and will push the case shoulder back much further than a standard die like a RCBS resizing die.

Whidden resizing die instructions
https://www.whiddengunworks.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/Sizer-die-warning-statement.pdf

WARNING
Failure to adhere with below warning could result in damaged and unsafe brass!
The Whidden Gunworks Sizer Die is engineered with a shorter overall length (OAL) compared to other manufactures of sizer dies. This means you can set the shoulder back further if desired based on your specific application. This die is not intended to be used while bottomed out or screwed flush with the shell plate. Doing so will result in the shoulder being set back too far, possibly rendering the casing unusable. During initial setup screw the die flush with the shell plate then back off 1-1 ½ turns, NOTE: Each full turn of the Sizer is approx. .071” so it does not have to be turned very far to make a noticeable adjustment.

I would not buy a bushing die for a standard off the shelf hunting rifle. And at the Whidden die website they tell you they get the most concentric cases from non-bushing full length dies. And they do not make or sell neck sizing dies.

Bottom line, I would recommend Forster full length benchrest dies with their high mounted floating expander. These Forster dies produce cases with the least amount of neck runout than any other die I have ever used. And combine this with the Forster benchrest seating dies and you will make ammo with very little to no bullet runout.

With the Forster die and its high mounted floating expander the case neck is held and centered in the die when the expander enters the case neck. This prevents the expander from pulling the case neck off center and greatly reduces neck runout and very concentric cases.



Below are sizing dies of various manufactures, the only problem with this video is the Forster high mounted floating expander was not tested with the expander in the die. And a separate expander die was used and does not show how little runout the Forster die produces.

Ultimate 6.5 creedmoor sizing die comparison
 

wboregon

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2017
Messages
124
Bottom line, I would recommend Forster full length benchrest dies with their high mounted floating expander. These Forster dies produce cases with the least amount of neck runout than any other die I have ever used. And combine this with the Forster benchrest seating dies and you will make ammo with very little to no bullet runout.

With the Forster die and its high mounted floating expander the case neck is held and centered in the die when the expander enters the case neck. This prevents the expander from pulling the case neck off center and greatly reduces neck runout and very concentric cases.



Is a case is tapered is it truly supported while the expander runs through the neck, or is this just forster's marketing gimick. One would think that there would be minimal contact with the die body in a lot of tapered cases.
 

bigedp51

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2010
Messages
1,022
Is a case is tapered is it truly supported while the expander runs through the neck, or is this just forster's marketing gimick. One would think that there would be minimal contact with the die body in a lot of tapered cases.
The case neck is held and centered in the neck of the die when the Forster expander enters the case neck. Meaning the Forster expander can not pull the case neck off center and induce neck runout.

The biggest cause of neck runout is when the expander is locked down off center. And if the case rim has any dings on the inside of the rim it will cause the case to tilt in the shell holder on the down stroke of the ram. And the Forster high mounted floating expander system even prevents the case from tilting in the shell holder. Because the case neck is held and centered in the neck of the die during expanding.

Below I replaced all my RCBS expanders with Forster expanders to reduce neck runout.
Below on the left a RCBS expander raised as high as it will move, and on the right the replacement Forster high mounted floating expander that fits RCBS dies.



Below a modified Forster expander and spindle assembly fitted to a Redding .243 full length die. And this modification greatly reduces neck rounout. "AND" the Forster expander has far less surface area than the Redding expander. Meaning far less pull on the neck that can move the shoulder forward, no wonder why some people complain about expander drag and effort.



Bottom line, I'm not guessing about the Forster full length benchrest dies because I have first hand experience using them.
 
Last edited:

wboregon

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2017
Messages
124
The case neck is held and centered in the neck of the die when the Forster expander enters the case neck. Meaning the Forster expander can not pull the case neck off center and induce neck runout.

The biggest cause of neck runout is when the expander is locked down off center. And if the case rim has any dings on the inside of the rim it will cause the case to tilt in the shell holder on the down stroke of the ram. And the Forster high mounted floating expander system even prevents the case from tilting in the shell holder. Because the case neck is held and centered in the neck of the die during expanding.

Below I replaced all my RCBS expanders with Forster expanders to reduce neck runout.
Below on the left a RCBS expander raised as high as it will move, and on the right the replacement Forster high mounted floating expander that fits RCBS dies.



Below a modified Forster expander and spindle assembly fitted to a Redding .243 full length die. And this modification greatly reduces neck rounout. "AND" the Forster expander has far less surface area than the Redding expander. Meaning far less pull on the neck that can move the shoulder forward, no wonder why some people complain about expander drag and effort.



Bottom line, I'm not guessing about the Forster full length benchrest dies because I have first hand experience using them.

Yeah not trying to **** in your cherios, just wasn't sure if it really supported the case while expanding the neck
 

tbrice23

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2012
Messages
3,077
Location
Indiana
The case neck is held and centered in the neck of the die when the Forster expander enters the case neck. Meaning the Forster expander can not pull the case neck off center and induce neck runout.

The biggest cause of neck runout is when the expander is locked down off center. And if the case rim has any dings on the inside of the rim it will cause the case to tilt in the shell holder on the down stroke of the ram. And the Forster high mounted floating expander system even prevents the case from tilting in the shell holder. Because the case neck is held and centered in the neck of the die during expanding.

Below I replaced all my RCBS expanders with Forster expanders to reduce neck runout.
Below on the left a RCBS expander raised as high as it will move, and on the right the replacement Forster high mounted floating expander that fits RCBS dies.



Below a modified Forster expander and spindle assembly fitted to a Redding .243 full length die. And this modification greatly reduces neck rounout. "AND" the Forster expander has far less surface area than the Redding expander. Meaning far less pull on the neck that can move the shoulder forward, no wonder why some people complain about expander drag and effort.



Bottom line, I'm not guessing about the Forster full length benchrest dies because I have first hand experience using them.
I HATE Reddings factory expander ball !!!
 

USAF Marksman

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2013
Messages
153
Thanks for all of the great replies everyone. I've read good things about the Forster dies before. Maybe I'll give those a shot. It sounds to me like I'll get a normal set of dies, maybe a full length, neck sizer, and seater set. I think I might spend the money and get a neck turning tool as well. I've never really considered that before, but you've made it sound like a good tool for the arsenal. This is not the first cartridge I've ever loaded. But, it is the first one I've ever considered "stepping up my game" on. I don't think I'll need the bushing die, which is ultimately the question that I wanted to answer, so thank you again.

So now its the Master Hunter set, or something else....hmmmm
 

Trending threads

Top