Data for shooting at higher elevations

yobuck

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I guess everyone has their own experiences, out here in the fall it's not unusual to see a 30*f swing. Elevation is less of a factor for me.
Yes a sighter is the best data you can have but not usually going to send a sighter with the animal standing there. you are gonna do it earlier in the day or the day before to make sure your data is holding true meaning that you can trust it later in the day or the next day.
Depends on the animal, whitetail deer which is what those of us in the East hunt at long range will as a rule not run off unless hit or even singed by the bullet.
Fact is it isnt uncommon for them to sniff the ground where a bullet impacted.
Elk are apt to behave very similar and not run after a shot.
Black bear on the other hand will as a rule run on the first shot.
Problem is there is lots of theory coming from the lips of those who have never actually hunted.
Also realize that it has been being done very successfully for decades before some of these devices were even thought of.
If you have a rutting buck situation, an uncooperative doe could take him off the hillside and gone before you ever get a shot.
And that can happen in minits.
Thats called realville, not dreamville.
But what you do can often make a big difference in the outcome.
 

Jeffrey Van Zandt

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tok
Depends on the animal, whitetail deer which is what those of us in the East hunt at long range will as a rule not run off unless hit or even singed by the bullet.
Fact is it isnt uncommon for them to sniff the ground where a bullet impacted.
Elk are apt to behave very similar and not run after a shot.
Black bear on the other hand will as a rule run on the first shot.
Problem is there is lots of theory coming from the lips of those who have never actually hunted.
Also realize that it has been being done very successfully for decades before some of these devices were even thought of.
If you have a rutting buck situation, an uncooperative doe could take him off the hillside and gone before you ever get a shot.
And that can happen in minits.
Thats called realville, not dreamville.
But what you do can often make a big difference in the outcome.
ya ok 20 tears ago there were very few long range hunters and what is long range to you in the past the gear of the common shooter ws not made for long range the old wood 700 rems in what ever cal topped with the gun store scope a gold ring just were not able to do it. I have herd may a couch shooter say I dropped the moose at 1200 yards with my old 06 and most can not even do the ranging to make that shot
 

yobuck

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east central fl. /n.c. pa.
If the velocity changes with elevation from sea level to 8000 feet (with everything else remaining constant), how can you determine if you have the right dope without shooting the rifle over a chronograph at the given altitude? All data at the higher altitude (temp, wind, etc etc) can be obtained with your hand held electronics, but what do you do about muzzle velocity change due to change in elevation?? Is it insignificant and nothing to worry about? Best confirmation can be to dust a rock across a canyon, but that option is not always possible, and I'm not sure how many bring a chrono to hunting camp to check the velocity at the higher elevation. Is velocity change due to change in elevation a factor you need to consider??
Well without trying to be crass about it, its no different than learning how to do most things.
First find someone who does know, and who is willing to actually show you, and not just tell you what they think.
Actually its much easier than you might think.
 

yobuck

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ya ok 20 tears ago there were very few long range hunters and what is long range to you in the past the gear of the common shooter ws not made for long range the old wood 700 rems in what ever cal topped with the gun store scope a gold ring just were not able to do it. I have herd may a couch shooter say I dropped the moose at 1200 yards with my old 06 and most can not even do the ranging to make that shot
Well this is a perfect example of an uninformed person.
The world began the day we were born, and the games all started when we arrived. lol
Friend, my oldest son will soon be 60, and he has never hunted any other way since he started at age 12.
And as for equipment, he had all he needed when he started.
 

Taylorbok

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Sask
Depends on the animal, whitetail deer which is what those of us in the East hunt at long range will as a rule not run off unless hit or even singed by the bullet.
Fact is it isnt uncommon for them to sniff the ground where a bullet impacted.
Elk are apt to behave very similar and not run after a shot.
Black bear on the other hand will as a rule run on the first shot.
Problem is there is lots of theory coming from the lips of those who have never actually hunted.
Also realize that it has been being done very successfully for decades before some of these devices were even thought of.
If you have a rutting buck situation, an uncooperative doe could take him off the hillside and gone before you ever get a shot.
And that can happen in minits.
Thats called realville, not dreamville.
But what you do can often make a big difference in the outcome.
To each their own man. You wanna send a round with the deer standing there go hard. I take pride in first round impacts. It literally takes seconds to check your data. I'm a new school shooter, I started hunting less than 10 years ago. Started stretching legs less than 3. I have no problem using the tech available to me.
 

Jeffrey Van Zandt

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tok
Well there you go, for you it started about 10 years ago. lol
But im curious what makes you think first round hits arent possible other than by your method?
they are but most shooters that did 600 800 1000 yard shooting was done at F class matches camp perry 1000 with pep sights even work but most was done on known ranges with wind flags all over and and some matches even had wind callers for the shooters they still do in 1980 to range a shot what did you use a mildot scope? a tankers Laser or a golfers split image range finder? the gear was just not there for the hunter to make the long range shots on game. now there are long range matches PR matches were shooters can learn how to make the shots and at any matches you will find the kestrel laser range finder or the all inone range and Bel apps
 

Jeffrey Van Zandt

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tok
Practicing on a range with flags is better than nothing, but not much better - it is impossible not to see the flags and thus "cheat." Way better to shoot under field conditions.
yes get your dope and true it up and we shot rock and ledges up here along with some rock chucks when found
 
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Ga6570

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Well of coarse my interpretation of (confirm data) could be wrong.
I am thinking that might mean something like send some lead over there to confirm.
And if thats the case, i guess im confused as to why the need for these things.

i could have been more clear. The data I was thinking about was environmental conditions. Temperature, humidity, elevation, barometric pressure, etc. That is one of the awesome things about these tools. Little environmental factor changes are compensated for and the data configured and elevation to dial given to you. This of course also means the data given to you by the kestrel will adjust your velocity reading and you will be more likely to have first round hits!

hope that helps.
 

yobuck

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east central fl. /n.c. pa.
they are but most shooters that did 600 800 1000 yard shooting was done at F class matches camp perry 1000 with pep sights even work but most was done on known ranges with wind flags all over and and some matches even had wind callers for the shooters they still do in 1980 to range a shot what did you use a mildot scope? a tankers Laser or a golfers split image range finder? the gear was just not there for the hunter to make the long range shots on game. now there are long range matches PR matches were shooters can learn how to make the shots and at any matches you will find the kestrel laser range finder or the all inone range and Bel apps
Well as for rangefinders, there were very good ones in use during WW1, and the same type was used in WW2.
These were used by all the countries involved.
Bausch&Lomb made one as well as Barr&Stroud with the latter being easier to use and the most popular with long range hunters in this country for decades.
The Carl Zeiss co. made excellent ones for Germany.
The Wild co. pronounced (Vild) which is a Swiss company also produced them. Many of these units became available after the war, and long range hunters bought and used them.
I still own a Wild unit and it is always in my vehicle when i hunt.
Regardless as to which lazer unit you might own dont ever bet anything you dont want to lose by comparing it to any of those units, assuming they are in good condition which many are.
If you can see the target regardless of conditions, you will get a range, period, and you wont always do that with even the very best lazers with the possible exception of the military units.
As for having (precise) data, that might be fine when your shooting at some type of target, which is what most people are doing.
But good luck with that approach when your hunting.
 
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