Data for shooting at higher elevations

LRNut

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I travel back and forth between CO (8750) and AZ (1200 to 1400). I use a SIG 2400 ABS and find it compensates for different altitudes extremely well, even using BCs. It also compensates for angles very well. The SIG uses ABS software.

Not sure why you can't verify; just shoot at a rock at long range.
 

Jeffrey Van Zandt

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tok
Well isnt modern tech. just wonderfull?
To think that back in the dark ages we had to rely on things like where the last bullet landed.
And then use the scope to dial to it so we could hit the target on the second shot.
But this way seems so much better.
Do they come in a choice of color?
OK, OK, ive got every thing entered, where is it, where is it, **** didnt it wait around for me? lol
at 700 800 1000 yards the game most times do not even you are there most time you have the time to set up wait for the shot you want a take the moose boo with one round if you rush you most likly shound not even try shooting at long range. and when you hunt and shot at different spots in one day the kestrel is the tool that is needed. say looking for blacktails along the beaches in the morn then heading up for a goat at 6000 ft it is a tool one should have also save shooting out your barrel. and when bluethooth between the kestrel and your range finder it is quick
 

LRNut

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at 700 800 1000 yards the game most times do not even you are there most time you have the time to set up wait for the shot you want a take the moose boo with one round if you rush you most likly shound not even try shooting at long range. and when you hunt and shot at different spots in one day the kestrel is the tool that is needed. say looking for blacktails along the beaches in the morn then heading up for a goat at 6000 ft it is a tool one should have also save shooting out your barrel. and when bluethooth between the kestrel and your range finder it is quick
Not as quick as having everything in your rangefinder.
 

338 dude

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Well isnt modern tech. just wonderfull?
To think that back in the dark ages we had to rely on things like where the last bullet landed.
And then use the scope to dial to it so we could hit the target on the second shot.
But this way seems so much better.
Do they come in a choice of color?
OK, OK, ive got every thing entered, where is it, where is it, **** didnt it wait around for me? lol
G7BR2
 

yobuck

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east central fl. /n.c. pa.
Yes, knowing your rifle and data can help you interpolate when you have to take a shot and don’t have everything “just perfect “
my experience and practice with the rifle and data helps this all come together into the package and allows me to have confidence in my shot. Practice and prepare for long and take shots you are comfortable and confident in.
Well of coarse my interpretation of (confirm data) could be wrong.
I am thinking that might mean something like send some lead over there to confirm.
And if thats the case, i guess im confused as to why the need for these things.
 

Taylorbok

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Well of coarse my interpretation of (confirm data) could be wrong.
I am thinking that might mean something like send some lead over there to confirm.
And if thats the case, i guess im confused as to why the need for these things.
are you able to calculate (or log) your data for every elevation, temperature, pressure wind direction and speed at every distance.... OK Great. Now memorize it.
the fact is there is always error in these calculations, that is the reason for verification.
 

yobuck

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are you able to calculate (or log) your data for every elevation, temperature, pressure wind direction and speed at every distance.... OK Great. Now memorize it.
the fact is there is always error in these calculations, that is the reason for verification.
Well in the real world where most of us hunt, the elevation and temp differences wont vary all that much from day to day.
And a few degrees temp difference might mean a click or so which comes with experience.
Certainly there are differences between an altitude of 1000’ and 5000’ or more and charts can be and are made for both.
Wind is the most critical element, especially where wide deep valleys containing large streams are involved requiring shooting over them.
A sighter shot is always the best indicator, and again if were going to do that, who needs anything else?
 

Laelkhunter

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If the velocity changes with elevation from sea level to 8000 feet (with everything else remaining constant), how can you determine if you have the right dope without shooting the rifle over a chronograph at the given altitude? All data at the higher altitude (temp, wind, etc etc) can be obtained with your hand held electronics, but what do you do about muzzle velocity change due to change in elevation?? Is it insignificant and nothing to worry about? Best confirmation can be to dust a rock across a canyon, but that option is not always possible, and I'm not sure how many bring a chrono to hunting camp to check the velocity at the higher elevation. Is velocity change due to change in elevation a factor you need to consider??
 
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Taylorbok

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Well in the real world where most of us hunt, the elevation and temp differences wont vary all that much from day to day.
And a few degrees temp difference might mean a click or so which comes with experience.
Certainly there are differences between an altitude of 1000’ and 5000’ or more and charts can be and are made for both.
Wind is the most critical element, especially where wide deep valleys containing large streams are involved requiring shooting over them.
A sighter shot is always the best indicator, and again if were going to do that, who needs anything else?
I guess everyone has their own experiences, out here in the fall it's not unusual to see a 30*f swing. Elevation is less of a factor for me.
Yes a sighter is the best data you can have but not usually going to send a sighter with the animal standing there. you are gonna do it earlier in the day or the day before to make sure your data is holding true meaning that you can trust it later in the day or the next day.
 

LRNut

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I don't see any velocity deviation when going from 1200 to 8750 elevation. You will hit higher and the effects of wind are a bit less than at sea level or close to it. As I have said before, elevation makes far more difference than temperature. In CO I shoot from 40 to 80, and frankly, don't see that much of a difference - maybe one click at 80 vs 40. On the other hand, my impact at 715 is about 1 MOA higher if I don't adjust.

One way to minimize the effects of temp and altitude is to shoot as high of a BC as you can; if you plot the difference in impact at various altitudes or temperatures, you will see that curve flattens out. In other words, there is a much larger difference between BCs of .4 to .5 than from .7 to .8 - you get diminishing returns. On the other hand, the reduction in BC due to a change in temp or altitude has less of an impact with a higher BC.
 
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