Darn Non-Resident Hunters?!?

wildcat westerner

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2009
Messages
441
There is much said above that is enlightening and good. The sad thing is I doubt it will change anything in this regard. Here is New Mexico there is much beauty and also poverty and poverty denial. The situation exacerbates the "slob" mentality which also adds gas to the fire of ACCESS in New Mexico. When access revolves around the dollar bill, and we are speaking of the second poorest state in the U.S., you can imagine how emotional this issue is here. I know hunters from other states who have come here, have done their homework, come in good physical condition, and exert effort in their hunting and were quite successful. In three separate incidents these successful hunters were confronted by residents, unwilling to put in the time, research, effort, and the bucks to achieve the same hunting success, but resented other people for doing so.
This situation will never change in New Mexico, nor, lets face it in most western states.
 

LRNut

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2004
Messages
440
Location
Arizona/Colorado
Very well said. I live in Texas and I like to hunt in Colorado. The last time I went elk hunting some resident hunters camped pretty close to our camp site. We were there for 10 days. It was 3rd season. We hunt up in Columbine Pass area. We invited them into our camp and they were like we were invading their space. They were telling us we had to move because this is their camp sight and they set up here every year. It got so bad that they called the GW on us trying to get us to move. The only thing that saved us was the 1st day we drove in and started to set up camp we met the GW and introduced ourselves and were we were from. Super nice GW. We asked if we could just scout around with no guns until 3rd season was open. He said yes. Just don’t take any guns with you because another GW might get the wrong impression you are hunting out of season. We just said NP. I do believe it was after the 4th or 5th day we were there, thats when our neighbors set up camp. I mean they were around 20’ from us close. Well anyway this could go on. The GW actually mad them move their campsite and told us not to let this discourage us from coming out in the future. Again super nice GW. My friends/family and I will never judge a hole state based of one bad encounter with some very rude people. I know Texas has its bad apples as well. Really wish everyone the best of luck this hunting season. Be kind to your fellow hunters. After all hunting is all about getting outdoors and enjoying the wildlife and meeting new people and makes new friends.
I am an AZ resident but I spend most of my time in CO now (and file taxes in both CO and AZ). I am AMAZED at how many Texas plates I see in CO, esp in the summer. Seeing tons of CA plates in AZ these days (and quite a few in CO) but much prefer the Texas plates over California (political reasons).
 

BCMAG2

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2012
Messages
169
Prior to my first time 2016 (Idaho panhandle) I contacted a fish & game biologist based out of Coeur d'Alene. This guy told me a bunch of his lifelong secrets and put me in a honey hole.
Not likely.
The Fish and Game biologist/CO/tag salesman in CDA likely told you how to find other people’s honey holes that he gleaned from them at mandatory roadside game check stations. Then he gave that info away to every non-resident he talked to so they would buy a $450 elk tag (now $600) and fund his salary. (Idaho Fish and Game receives no general tax funds from the state.) So a very real part of their jobs is devoted to setting up booths at “Big Horn”, outdoor and related trade shows in Spokane, Seattle, etc., to promote their license and tag sales to non-residents. They were recorded by a local resident a few years ago hucking the game unit I live in from one such Spokane convention booth, saying “Just come hunt in Idaho’s Game Unit X…we are growing deer and elk there faster than we can shoot em!” Of course, none of that was actually true, but it sure was effective in flooding all my hunting areas with Washington hunters. But I don’t blame the hunters for that. The problem is Idaho’s money-addicted game department.
 

david.eustache

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 7, 2021
Messages
67
Location
Michigan
Not likely.
The Fish and Game biologist/CO/tag salesman in CDA likely told you how to find other people’s honey holes that he gleaned from them at mandatory roadside game check stations. Then he gave that info away to every non-resident he talked to so they would buy a $450 elk tag (now $600) and fund his salary. (Idaho Fish and Game receives no general tax funds from the state.) So a very real part of their jobs is devoted to setting up booths at “Big Horn”, outdoor and related trade shows in Spokane, Seattle, etc., to promote their license and tag sales to non-residents. They were recorded by a local resident a few years ago hucking the game unit I live in from one such Spokane convention booth, saying “Just come hunt in Idaho’s Game Unit X…we are growing deer and elk there faster than we can shoot em!” Of course, none of that was actually true, but it sure was effective in flooding all my hunting areas with Washington hunters. But I don’t blame the hunters for that. The problem is Idaho’s money-addicted game department.
Nobody there but me. Guy down the road lets me use his water and lets me have my VA meds shipped to his home. I don't see any hunters where I'm at. Maybe six in 10 weeks
 

Skykarp

Active Member
Joined
Apr 3, 2021
Messages
37
Location
USA
A big reason this fight has also become a bigger issue in the last 10 years is population change.

look at the growth charts for Arizona, Idaho, Montana, and Colorado. They are all astronomical. So even if someone was a NR at one point they are a Res of that state now.

then the turn happens and they start bitching about NR taking their animals when they were once the same person.

you will never solve the issue of people being misguided in their throughts. Kill them with kindness and leave the land better than they did and hope it rubs off.
 

Maverick254

Member
Joined
Dec 5, 2019
Messages
17
Location
Texas
Ok I’ll get on this with my opinion. I live in Northwest Colorado where every big game hunting seasons we are flooded with non resident hunters great for our small town of Meeker’s economy. Our gun club opens our private range to hunters to check their rifes for correct sighting. We have a member at the bench spotting for the shooters. Ive met a lot of great people from many different states but on the flip side I’ve met some real penis wrinkles and some of the worst offenders are from our own state Denver in particular and some from the west coast state. Our club makes about $5000.00 a year doing the sight in as well as a raffle for 3 rifle prizes.
Do they take a deer or elk from me maybe but it doesn’t matter we are all have fun doing what we like to do. There will always be slob hunters from out of state as well as in state. My 2 pennies
I live in Texas and hunt in Colorado-Meeker in fact! We always stop at the local gun club’s sight-in to make sure the scope hasn’t been bumped somewhere along the trip. The gun club members are always some of the nicest people along with just about everyone in town. We make a point to not leave any trash behind and be courteous guests. There have been some years that tag sandwich was hard to swallow, but the trip is about more than filling that tag. To get up in the mountains with friends from home, strengthen the friendships with locals that have become family over the years, spend time in the great outdoors, and have the opportunity to hunt Elk/Mule Deer is what makes a successful trip.

Looking forward to this November when we roll into town again!
 

griz375

Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2011
Messages
24
The issue is more about competition in the field, and folks that live in an area year round that can't afford to hunt 4 or 5 states and may only get 7-10 days a year to hunt find themselves tripping over hoards of other hunters. Moreover some folks born, raised, and live where tags are limited through a draw and get testy when they don't draw and see NR hunters with a tag in their backyard. The concept of NR hunters being bad stewards is nothing more than gaslighting the larger issue.
 

Left Hand Dave

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 10, 2016
Messages
380
Location
Ohio
I think most of the people on this site are good stewards and folks you would be willing to call a hunting buddy if given the chance to know them. I haul trash out of places in my pack when I find it and was even questioned about it by locals of one state I was hunting, probably the ones that left it there. I have met quite a few very nice people on my hunting travels some hunters some not and very few turds. On the other hand I was raised right by my parents and my uncle taught me how to be a respectable hunter. So I don't much like people that don't even know me treating me like a scourge because I live in another state. I give people hunting in my state the benefit of the doubt and treat them as I would like to be until they earn something different.
 

Fedwell

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2019
Messages
211
Location
Colorado
I live in Texas and hunt in Colorado-Meeker in fact! We always stop at the local gun club’s sight-in to make sure the scope hasn’t been bumped somewhere along the trip. The gun club members are always some of the nicest people along with just about everyone in town. We make a point to not leave any trash behind and be courteous guests. There have been some years that tag sandwich was hard to swallow, but the trip is about more than filling that tag. To get up in the mountains with friends from home, strengthen the friendships with locals that have become family over the years, spend time in the great outdoors, and have the opportunity to hunt Elk/Mule Deer is what makes a successful trip.

Looking forward to this November when we roll into town again!
When you Pass through Rifle Co. Stop in at Shooters Grille. The place belongs to our GREAT Congress Woman.
 

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