Coyotes won’t come in on a call

Reemty J

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436 lay it out there...……….so when they hang up, what do you do, run us thru the scenario, please...……..
 

436

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436 lay it out there...……….so when they hang up, what do you do, run us thru the scenario, please...……..
Ok, as they hang up, change the volume of the Fox Pro, drop it down in volume, then while the Fox is running through the call, add the mouth call of the Herb's Howler, at about the same volume, then bring each one down a little at a time then stop the calling and wait, here is where I start hitting the coaxer and squeaker if I can't see him anymore. If he is still out there kicking up dirt and wanting to fight, or sitting back watching, do both calls together again most likely a dominant male challenge sound then wait, but if they are just sitting then perhaps a pack food call, of course, call types also depend on the time of year you are calling them..., as to whether it's a dominant male, hurt pup, female, and so on., I've found that the Herb's provides all that's needed along with the electric call as a combo for those Yotes that hang up on me. Good luck.
 

DSheetz

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And that kind of high lights what I keep saying about a lot of times the volume is too high when we are calling especially with the e-callers . It's so easy to get them turned up too loud . The amount of volume needed depends on a lot of things and air density is one of the main things that plays a big part in it . If you notice with different amounts of humidity the sound carries differently the same as sent does . Here some days I can hear trains at 5 or six miles away other days I can't from the same distance or I may here traffic on the high way today but I didn't yesterday . It's all part of the art of calling . The direction of the wind plays a huge part in it as does wind speed . What time of the year as you said also does . Isn't that the sort of thing that keeps us doing it ?
 

coyotemaster

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Back up your Fox caller with a mouth call say something like a "cow horn" Herbs Howlers which I used for many, many years, and found them to be just the ticket for hard holding Yotes just out of range.
Sorry OP we kinda got off the trail. There's lots of good advice here. Its been said already but your dealing with educated coyotes and Theyre tough! Out to 500yds shouldn't be a big problem with a good rifle as long as the wind isn't blowing.If it always blows spend some money on shells and practice shooting long-hint steel plates attached to conduit stand.
All info imo will work and as has been said the worse the weather the better the calling. 0 Fh. and 8" of snow and they're a different critters they will come when stressed and starving.
 

best defense

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I’m not sure if I’m doing something wrong or if that’s just how it goes. I have been out chasing coyotes well over 30 times now and still haven’t had one in range.

I make sure I set up at least 100 yards off the call crosswind and elevated.

i’m using a fox pro shockwave and have tried about every combination.

The majority of the time they respond to my locator call or pop in distress but don’t give a **** about coming in. In fact after 15 minutes or so I might even here them yipping further away.

so far the closest I came was a lone coyote sitting at about 500 yards. She definitely heard my call. She just wouldn’t come in.... for an hour and a half she laid down there. Every now and again I would mix up the call and try something new which would cause her to stand up take a few steps forward and then lay back down. Eventually she got bored and strolled off the other way out of sight.


i’ve tried multiple areas very far apart with the same results. Am I doing something wrong? Or does it usually take this much effort to bag one? it’s not like there’s a shortage, I hear tons of them.
We've had similar success recently so we switched things up a little. We put some trail cameras out and dripped sardine juice from a can across the area where we figured they were traveling. Sure enough, the cameras caught a coyote about 10:00 that night. We don't have night vision, so we are not too sure if we can call one into range then use lights to shoot it, but that is going to be our next effort.
 

Jeremy R Snyder

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I didn’t read through all the posts but one question I have is are you hunting at day or night for them?
Coyotes at night tend to be a little bolder than daytime in my experience. It is very rare to get a dog in on a call during the day for me. The only time I’ve had any luck is when I play a woodpecker distress or ranting red bird with a decoy attached to the caller. I turn the call on and leave it on, sometimes for up to an hour before i see a dog coming in. Not sure if it’s cause they are layed up during the day and hesitant to get up to investigate or if it takes them that much longer to navigate to the call but it usually always produces results.
-Chicken scraps usually get the best of all of them. I have my wife put the trimmings from chicken year round in a bag for me and always take them out when I hunt. I lay them around the caller in a big circle, throw them in a 360 away from the caller and have better results yet. Again if it’s daytime it may take a little bit but their noses will get them into trouble when it comes to a piece of chicken.
- Night calling is my preferred method, dogs just seem to hit the fields harder at night and are way less weary it seems. I generally move a lot more at night. Do a set for 20-30 minutes and move to the next spot. I’ve had dogs answer and not commit, move to a spot away from them and all of a sudden they are coming in. My only complaints about night hunting are being able to get on them fast enough, especially when they are hung up on a wood line on the side of a field which is common. Decoy out in the field tends to draw them out, no light needed they will see the decoy on the darkest of nights.
I live in Upstate NY and I know the coyotes here are a lot different then the dogs out west seem to be. I hate watching the videos of these guys calling and being able to see a dog coming from a long ways out, a far shot here is 500 yards a lot of times because of the trees and the dogs always use the tree lines even at night so seeing them and getting the shot is a lot trickier than the fields out west. Best of luck to you and hope to see some pics when you get one or 10!
 

Gater

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I didn’t read through all the posts but one question I have is are you hunting at day or night for them?
Coyotes at night tend to be a little bolder than daytime in my experience. It is very rare to get a dog in on a call during the day for me. The only time I’ve had any luck is when I play a woodpecker distress or ranting red bird with a decoy attached to the caller. I turn the call on and leave it on, sometimes for up to an hour before i see a dog coming in. Not sure if it’s cause they are layed up during the day and hesitant to get up to investigate or if it takes them that much longer to navigate to the call but it usually always produces results.
-Chicken scraps usually get the best of all of them. I have my wife put the trimmings from chicken year round in a bag for me and always take them out when I hunt. I lay them around the caller in a big circle, throw them in a 360 away from the caller and have better results yet. Again if it’s daytime it may take a little bit but their noses will get them into trouble when it comes to a piece of chicken.
- Night calling is my preferred method, dogs just seem to hit the fields harder at night and are way less weary it seems. I generally move a lot more at night. Do a set for 20-30 minutes and move to the next spot. I’ve had dogs answer and not commit, move to a spot away from them and all of a sudden they are coming in. My only complaints about night hunting are being able to get on them fast enough, especially when they are hung up on a wood line on the side of a field which is common. Decoy out in the field tends to draw them out, no light needed they will see the decoy on the darkest of nights.
I live in Upstate NY and I know the coyotes here are a lot different then the dogs out west seem to be. I hate watching the videos of these guys calling and being able to see a dog coming from a long ways out, a far shot here is 500 yards a lot of times because of the trees and the dogs always use the tree lines even at night so seeing them and getting the shot is a lot trickier than the fields out west. Best of luck to you and hope to see some pics when you get one or 10!
We have a young fella around here that was sitting I a bean field calling dogs and shooting em with a 12 ga not sure what call he used but he was shooting the hell out of em
 

DSheetz

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Jeremy R Snyder , If your walking around spreading your chicken parts around your E-Caller don't you worry about spreading your scent around as well ? Do you leave your caller running at the same volume for the whole hour ? I've had better luck not moving around my stand much before I start calling . In the past I tried cover scents ect. and found them not to be overly productive for me just keeping my body clean and not using a ton of cologne ect. helps the most for me , not making a lot of noise coming into my stand and walking around my calling area , before starting to call , much also helps me . I don't use higher volumes at first and make sounds for calling only for a short amount of time 5-6 minutes , then I wait for about the same amount of time and repeat maybe with a little more volume . After doing this for 20 minutes or so if I haven't had any response I will turn the volume up loud for a few seconds 30 or so then turn it off for a few minutes and do it all over again . I have better luck making them curious about what , where and why the sound is being made so that they want to explore and check it out . I find that if I'm not getting birds , such as crows ect. coming to my calls I need to change my ways of calling till I start getting them to come to the call first then the coyote and fox will come after the birds and the birds will let me know when you have a sneaker lurking in the brush .
 

Jeremy R Snyder

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Mar 21, 2019
Messages
134
Location
Upstate NY
Jeremy R Snyder , If your walking around spreading your chicken parts around your E-Caller don't you worry about spreading your scent around as well ? Do you leave your caller running at the same volume for the whole hour ? I've had better luck not moving around my stand much before I start calling . In the past I tried cover scents ect. and found them not to be overly productive for me just keeping my body clean and not using a ton of cologne ect. helps the most for me , not making a lot of noise coming into my stand and walking around my calling area , before starting to call , much also helps me . I don't use higher volumes at first and make sounds for calling only for a short amount of time 5-6 minutes , then I wait for about the same amount of time and repeat maybe with a little more volume . After doing this for 20 minutes or so if I haven't had any response I will turn the volume up loud for a few seconds 30 or so then turn it off for a few minutes and do it all over again . I have better luck making them curious about what , where and why the sound is being made so that they want to explore and check it out . I find that if I'm not getting birds , such as crows ect. coming to my calls I need to change my ways of calling till I start getting them to come to the call first then the coyote and fox will come after the birds and the birds will let me know when you have a sneaker lurking in the brush .
I honestly don’t play with call volume much other than starting the caller off low then raising after a bit of not seeing anything. The chicken seems to take their mind off the scent, my opinion is if they are anywhere near you or the caller they usually know you are there scent blocker or not so we tried something different on the hung up dogs in areas we knew they were and put the chicken scraps out. For whatever the reason it has brought really good success so we keep doing it and it keeps them coming in. If they don’t commit the first time and we leave the chicken out there, again in my opinion, they almost get educated to when they hear the caller they associate it with the feeding. Works extremely well and has been a proven technique many other places. I think I got it from an old field and stream article a long ways back but it may have been something else... best of luck to all
 

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