Corn Tumbling Media in my Charge

Ed Loccisano

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I have changed my reloading practice due to this issue, I always separate media from my cases in a media separator with a hand crank, the vibration nocks any spare media loose and then I used a hand de-primer to punch out the spent primers, which also solves getting the media out of the flash holes!!
 

Moose Whacker

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Throw away the corn media, get some stainless jewelers media, Lemony Shine and some Dawn dish detergent.
Tumble wet, cleanest shinnyest cases ever, only need to tumble for about a half-hour or one hour for really dirty cases.
 

338 dude

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I have wondered to myself what would happen if one or more bits of stainless media remained in a case.
Thatā€™s what everyone that doesnā€™t use pins says and I guess it would be a problem if you let it happen
 

Coyote Shadow Tracker

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Anyone can decide from looking at possibly another 10,000 posts on prepping brass and what ways to clean your brass:
If it is too clean it is not good - well do not buy new brass!
If it is not clean - you don't get the same reloading.

Corncob and other similar media leave residue - especially if you go by the manufacture's recommendation to put a liquid cleaner with the corncob. It leaves a residue and film.
It all comes down to a clean case or not!
All the "Dry" medias will leave residue in your case- PERIOD!!
If you go by the theory of a used case with residue on the outside of the case to "Hold" the case when it is fired in the chamber- don't ever shoot new cases.
There is a factor of "Used" - dirty cases that will hold on to the chamber when expanded - shot. Some competition shooters believe in that and don't clean their cases. The dirty outside case "Grips" the chamber when fired.
Then there is the tumbler with stainless media with water and or cleaner, which cleans the outside as well as the inside of a brass case to clean just like a NEW case.
I won't go either way on this to say one way is better than another.
However I will give my "OPINION"
I put all my fired brass in a tumbler, with stainless media, water, a pinch of "Lemon Shine" & some Birchwood or any other Brass Cartridge Cleaner, let it tumble for an hour or two, and you have "like New Brass". Take it out-let it dry. Make sure that you shake all the stainless pins out of the cases-it's easy.
This way every case I reload is exactly the same - every time I load - as far as being cleaned inside and out.
Just my OPINION!!!
Clean the way you want.
 

MagnumManiac

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In 1991, I bought a new 17 Remington Model 700, at that time, no new rifle brass was available. A guy at a gun shop I used to visit said an unknown quantity and unknown times sized lot of brass was brought in for sale. It was Remington brand and appeared bright and shiny.
I bought them, 300 pieces or so, and proseeded to prime them, noticed a few had some green ā€˜somethingā€™ was stuck in the flash hole while I was inspecting the casesā€¦.removed them with a dental pick and moved on to charging them.
First 20 or so charged normally, then all of a sudden I was spilling powder everywhere. This confused the heck outta me, I had no idea what was going on or what could cause this sudden lack of powder space.
I dumped the powder and discovered that that green substance was coming out with the powder.
A 17 neck is hard to look into, but with plenty of light I was able to see the issueā€¦getting it out also caused an issue. The corn cob was still inside the case and shaking it was not getting it out.
Anyway, some of the cases must have still had some of that polishing corn cob media, because about a dozen rounds had very hard bolt lift after firing them.
Although I doubt the stuff burns away, it definitely changes the volume and increased pressureā€¦..so I would NOT be firing any rounds you SUSPECT may still contain corn cob media in the case.
I had forgotten about that incident, didnā€™t even know what the stuff was, I didnā€™t own a case polisher back then.

Cheers.
 

Laelkhunter

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I have changed my reloading practice due to this issue, I always separate media from my cases in a media separator with a hand crank, the vibration nocks any spare media loose and then I used a hand de-primer to punch out the spent primers, which also solves getting the media out of the flash holes!!

I agree with Ed, make extra sure the flash hole is not plugged or even partially plugged with any tumbling media.
 

Muddyboots

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Canned compressed air for "electronics" is about as clean as it gets which is what I use for double checking brass. BUT, once I switched the walnut media to incorporate reptile finely ground walnut media, cases virtually no longer have anything in them nor do primer flash holes plugged very often. I mix about 50% regular walnut with the reptile finely ground. I also noted much better turnover flow in vibrator. Cases cleaned faster with increased surface area from media. Just another 1 of 100,000 ways to clean brassšŸ¤Ŗ.
4DB9D0E0-188E-4962-8030-E1D633C7F083.jpeg
 

budlight

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Throw away the corn media, get some stainless jewelers media, Lemony Shine and some Dawn dish detergent.
Tumble wet, cleanest shinnyest cases ever, only need to tumble for about a half-hour or one hour for really dirty cases.
I bought a Thumblers Tumbler for wet stainless media 20 years ago and threw away all that junk dry media equipment. I wouldn't even give it to somebody that I didn't like. I was so tired of trying to poke out plugged primer holes and stuff wedged in the neck.

Wet pins even scrub out the case interior to restore case volume. I do certain calibers with 200 - 300 cases at a time and generally tumble for about 3 hours. My 7stw I only put in about a 100 at a time and do three hours.

I resize/trim/chamfer first so my cases are completely lube oil free for reloading. That way your cases are dry and no powder clings to the neck and throat impleading filling. The smaller the caliber the more important this is.

I don't even know why people cling to dry media tumblers. Not a wise move with the posted problem when you have the answer.
 

338 dude

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I bought a Thumblers Tumbler for wet stainless media 20 years ago and threw away all that junk dry media equipment. I wouldn't even give it to somebody that I didn't like. I was so tired of trying to poke out plugged primer holes and stuff wedged in the neck.

Wet pins even scrub out the case interior to restore case volume. I do certain calibers with 200 - 300 cases at a time and generally tumble for about 3 hours. My 7stw I only put in about a 100 at a time and do three hours.

I resize/trim/chamfer first so my cases are completely lube oil free for reloading. That way your cases are dry and no powder clings to the neck and throat impleading filling. The smaller the caliber the more important this is.

I don't even know why people cling to dry media tumblers. Not a wise move with the posted problem when you have the answer.
Try running your brass for about two hours instead of three you wonā€™t get as much neck peening, I still use the dry media tumblers and Walnut hull media from Harbor freight to polish after tumbling with wet pins
 
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