Colorado elk hunt

Caveman0101

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Mar 3, 2008
Messages
180
Location
Colorado
That's why I'm thinking it may be good
It may be, but you can't hunt it unless they open it up. All the national forest was closed throughout this past season, they still haven't said if it's going to be open this year because of "deadfall hazard". It really f'd up 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and late-season last year. A lot of people from out of state wasted a ton of money only to be able to hunt what little BLM there is in 18.
 

Upsidedownjack

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Dec 28, 2017
Messages
161
Also, idk if you're planning on camping from the truck or taking camp in on your backs and moving every day. Either way can work great...but if you're not finding elk, do not be afraid to get in the truck and move. Don't waste your entire hunt in an area with no sign of game.
It’s said that for the first time in Colo hunting, in an Area that you’ve never been in the Avg kill is one in FIVE YEARS! 🤞. That you won’t take that long. But it sometimes takes a few years to learn and understand the way ELK MOVE in that area. Talking to “locals” at the Coffee shop sometimes can help with finding your Elk! Good luck! Have shot and took home My Share of Elk over the year. Also, finding some friends who live in the Area, HELPS. A lot! Shires a hunt back home, Fishing , all sometimes helps in finding your First Colo Elk!
 

Muddyboots

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Feb 7, 2013
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3,177
Location
Michigan
The number one rule is elk are not deer. Sounds simple but it can be hard for a hard core deer hunter to drop their deer hunting perspective and pick up elk hunting methods. Take the advice to heart being given. Keep your camp on "wheels" to move at moments notice. Be capable of walking 15-20 miles. I know this sounds wild but over the week you will need this stamina to keep hunting deep. Consider spike camping to save energy. Call local biologists, they are always willing to help and know the lay of the land. Springs can be really big deal especially in burnt area. Boots may be your best asset so you can put miles behind you. What's over the next ridge will be your mantra. Enjoy every moment, drink in the beauty of the most scenic landscape on the planet. Researching is probably half the fun and it will add knowledge that can be the ace in hole for you! Kudus for reaching out! Lots of good guys here to help!

I have shared this before and hope 1st timers understand there are regs that have to be followed or else your hunt can be ruined fast!

"Since this is a first time hunt, this doesn't get talked about enough but can bite you really bad. If successful there are some legally required steps you have to take or else subject to fines. CPW is adamant on these requirements and rarely any slack is given:
  • Sign your tag when you buy it but they will show you where when you buy OTC. If in mail, sign it immediately upon receipt.
  • Do not detach your fishing license from the tag at all. Otherwise the fishing license is no longer valid.
  • Sign kill tag upon kill with dates etc filled out.
  • You are required to bring the meat out FIRST plus evidence of sex of the animal must be with the meat.
  • Head etc. must come out LAST. This is something they will not tolerate if you bring the head out first or no evidence of sex. On my last hunt, camp next to us brought head out first and he got whacked hard by CO since not first timer I think.
  • Hunter safety card has to be carried with you at all times unless you have it validated by a CPW office in person and recorded in their system. I carried mine the first year I had it validated to be sure in case it didn't show up in the CO search of the database. This can be confusing since you purchased the license online and entered the Hunter Safety info BUT it does not eliminate the need to carry the card until it is actually validated in person at a CPW office. This law is a real PITA and causes a lot of grief to hunters ASSUMING the wrong interpretation of this requirement.
 

tndeputy

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Joined
Jul 30, 2020
Messages
103
Location
tennessee
Thanks for all this info everyone has been so helpful can thank everyone enough and all this info is being very useful for someone who has never done a elk hunt
 

Monster Toms

Active Member
Joined
Nov 29, 2020
Messages
35
Location
Colorado
It’s said that for the first time in Colo hunting, in an Area that you’ve never been in the Avg kill is one in FIVE YEARS! 🤞. That you won’t take that long. But it sometimes takes a few years to learn and understand the way ELK MOVE in that area. Talking to “locals” at the Coffee shop sometimes can help with finding your Elk! Good luck! Have shot and took home My Share of Elk over the year. Also, finding some friends who live in the Area, HELPS. A lot! Shires a hunt back home, Fishing , all sometimes helps in finding your First Colo Elk!

No many helpful locals in that area. It is the Heart of resort country. Copper mountain to Vail ski area. Not many locals even hunt anymore, most hunters in those units are out of staters or Denver guys making the weekend run and hope
 
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tndeputy

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Jul 30, 2020
Messages
103
Location
tennessee
I was wondering about that is there any better units close to Avon we have a place to stay there in Avon but we don’t care to get a early start and drive if needed
 

Monster Toms

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Joined
Nov 29, 2020
Messages
35
Location
Colorado
Avon is the base area for beaver creek ski area, as a young boy we hunted elk and deer where the ski area is today. If your staying in Avon you can plan on a minimum 30-45 minute drive to start hiking. Spike camps will still be your best bet for success in those areas.
 

Muddyboots

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Feb 7, 2013
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3,177
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Michigan
One of the "tools" that we found to be extremely helpful were extra large game carts. They are ONLY reasonable to use if you have 2 tracks etc to get back where you need to be or even to carry your gear for a "base camp" to jump out for a spike camp. They are pretty sturdy and can carry more than you can carry easily plus no shoulder burns! They have limitations but under right circumstances can be extremely helpful.
 

Bravo 4

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Jul 20, 2007
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4,070
Location
The South
One of the "tools" that we found to be extremely helpful were extra large game carts. They are ONLY reasonable to use if you have 2 tracks etc to get back where you need to be or even to carry your gear for a "base camp" to jump out for a spike camp. They are pretty sturdy and can carry more than you can carry easily plus no shoulder burns! They have limitations but under right circumstances can be extremely helpful.
We have been thinking about those
I’m no expert but didn’t think those were legal in some places, best to call and do some research.
 

Muddyboots

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Feb 7, 2013
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3,177
Location
Michigan
You are correct that you have to determine if legal in the specific area you are hunting. I found they are not allowed in at least one unique designated wilderness area where bicycles etc are prohibited. Not all but some so like all CO regulations they apply in different areas.
 

Tomjoad

Member
Joined
Jan 28, 2021
Messages
14
Location
Denver, CO
Lots of good feedback above. I’m very new to this site but not new to Colorado (resident) or to Elk. I won’t get into unit advice online. Stats are available online free from CO in terrible form or pay $150 and have gohunt crunch the numbers for you.

I have no idea what your personal circumstance is with health, fitness or most critically experience in western backcountry so feel free to take this with a grain of salt. Set very conservative goals and hunt plans based on your realistic limitations. Have backup, redundant and detailed hunt plans. Get in shape but most importantly find opportunities to get in the backcountry. I spent over two decades, mountaineering and off trail backcountry backpacking before I ever hunted, those are the most critical skills I rely on when hunting. Use the off-season to get in as much time in the mountains as your situation will allow, this will give you a chance to dial your kit before you have an extra 15-20 lbs of gun/kill kit/and 3rd-4th season layers with you. Get up early, stay out late and get comfortable route finding in the dark in big country. You don’t want to be figuring any of this out on a hunt. You want it to be like breathing so you can actually focus on the hunt, not learning 50 new skills related to backcountry camping and travel. Be very conservative about distance especially off trail, in an unknown area. 2 miles sounds like a cakewalk until you are in galactic deadfall sidehilling on a 40deg slope with a 60lb pack while carrying a rifle. This isn’t a hypothetical scenario, it’s a lot of Colorado (get flexible). Pay a lot of attention to topos and slope shading. It’s possible for a route to look doable in satellite when it’s not even remotely feasible on the ground. Topos can also teach you a lot about game movement that satellite can’t.

Lastly on tech platforms I too am done with onX. I prefer the flexibility of Gaia in the field and the ability to import USGS topos into that platform as Gaia and onX topos are garbage IMO. For desktop scouting nothing can touch google earth. Lots of buried tools and techniques for using this application well, go deep.
 
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