Colorado elk draw

parshal

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 29, 2002
Messages
613
Location
Colorado
My intention is not to run this thread off the rails, but what are you guys with high double digit antelope points, looking for, here in Colorado? You can find a great antelope with 2 and less than 10 points...Just sayin'.
I have no idea! LOL. I just started collecting points because I can. If I really want to shoot a pronghorn I just go to Wyoming.
 

LR Smoker

New Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2013
Messages
4
Basically never having been on a Elk hunt before and at altitude pretty much anything in the way of suggestions or recommendations would be of help. I realize that I'm going to have to make a serious effort to get in even better shape with walking. hiking and cycling. My primary concern is to the basic equipment to carry along that I'm going to bring up the hills with me. Do you suggest a pack that can carry the rifle in the center and big enough to bring spotting scope, range finder. rain suit etc.... or am I better off to use my assault pack and carry the gun in my hands all the time. Kind of depends on the terrain and if I'm going to be hauling my tired body up the mountain using my hands to hang onto trees or rocks I guess. I know that the best scenario would be to use a guide but I couldn't resist the offer.
 

LR Smoker

New Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2013
Messages
4
Which unit? And yes show up a couple days early.
I'm supposed to be there about 10 days early for a wedding and then just hang around until the 14th so I should have time to acclimatize and hike a bit in the area which should help. The unit is 7,8,9,19,191 however I believe the focus will be in the lower numbers.
 

Elkeater

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 3, 2017
Messages
897
I'm supposed to be there about 10 days early for a wedding and then just hang around until the 14th so I should have time to acclimatize and hike a bit in the area which should help. The unit is 7,8,9,19,191 however I believe the focus will be in the lower numbers.
Yup go 7 high. PM me I hunt that area.
 

ducky

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2016
Messages
294
Location
Colorado
My daughter drew 1st choice ML bull tag, 2nd choice plains ML buck tag, and 1st choice pronghorn buck tag. She doesn't have enough accumulated points for moose, big horn, and goat. She also has 5 points for bear, we'll focus on that tag next year.

I'm pretty much focused on her hunting until she heads to college. So I only got points in elk, moose, bear, sheep, and goat. I did draw a 2nd choice plains ML doe tag, and a 3rd choice pronghorn doe tag. When shes off to college n two years I'll draw a 4th season buck tag and a pretty decent bull tag. Moose I have 15 total points and doubt I'll see that one anytime soon.

I'm really looking forward to seeing my daughter put her sights on a bull in September!
 

CO_Guy

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 16, 2018
Messages
953
Location
CO, USA
Basically never having been on a Elk hunt before and at altitude pretty much anything in the way of suggestions or recommendations would be of help. I realize that I'm going to have to make a serious effort to get in even better shape with walking. hiking and cycling. My primary concern is to the basic equipment to carry along that I'm going to bring up the hills with me. Do you suggest a pack that can carry the rifle in the center and big enough to bring spotting scope, range finder. rain suit etc.... or am I better off to use my assault pack and carry the gun in my hands all the time. Kind of depends on the terrain and if I'm going to be hauling my tired body up the mountain using my hands to hang onto trees or rocks I guess. I know that the best scenario would be to use a guide but I couldn't resist the offer.
You'll gather a ton of info here but I thought I'd add one thing that is often overlooked by any elk newbie. If you choose to hike in, which is a great way to avoid crowds and really beat up a nice drainage or other elk path between their beds, keep in mind that you may have to pack out something the size of a small horse, at very least. You'll need the few tools, manpower and either a pack frame, sled (even if left at the truck) or make a travois from the trees available. You will not want to make this realization after making a kill 4+ miles in and among 3-4ft diameter deadfall.
 

Yukon75

New Member
Joined
Apr 13, 2016
Messages
4
Yeper indeed. Just got my Muley tag. Preferences my Elk this year, now have two points. 2nd Hunt allows you to buy over counter counter Bull or Cow Elk tags if you desire, don’t take away your preference points. Wanted to harvest one of them Mule Deer Bucks been seeing on my pass Elk Hunt. Plan to put in for Elk next year, maybe, we’ll see. Also Black Bear over counter is a $100 this year, might be picking one of them up as well.
Good Hunting and Safe Time to all those sharing them mountains in Colorado this season. Beware of them cats, they are there and they do stalk you. Kind of keeps them spidey senses in tune. lol
“Yukon”
 

Yukon75

New Member
Joined
Apr 13, 2016
Messages
4
You'll gather a ton of info here but I thought I'd add one thing that is often overlooked by any elk newbie. If you choose to hike in, which is a great way to avoid crowds and really beat up a nice drainage or other elk path between their beds, keep in mind that you may have to pack out something the size of a small horse, at very least. You'll need the few tools, manpower and either a pack frame, sled (even if left at the truck) or make a travois from the trees available. You will not want to make this realization after making a kill 4+ miles in and among 3-4ft diameter deadfall.
I hear that. The hunt is great and a great challenge, but the harvest and pack out is the chore, the work for sure especially in that night altitude and black forest.
 

Yukon75

New Member
Joined
Apr 13, 2016
Messages
4
I hear that. The hunt is great and a great challenge, but the harvest and pack out is the chore, the work for sure especially in that night altitude and black forest.
That was to be “that night and high altitude”
 

LR Smoker

New Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2013
Messages
4
You'll gather a ton of info here but I thought I'd add one thing that is often overlooked by any elk newbie. If you choose to hike in, which is a great way to avoid crowds and really beat up a nice drainage or other elk path between their beds, keep in mind that you may have to pack out something the size of a small horse, at very least. You'll need the few tools, manpower and either a pack frame, sled (even if left at the truck) or make a travois from the trees available. You will not want to make this realization after making a kill 4+ miles in and among 3-4ft diameter deadfall.
That’s for sure. I’ve hunted moose quite a bit and without the proper equipment/ access for the removal it can become quite an ordeal. I’m expecting that for the most part I’ll be on my own which doesn’t bother me for the field dressing and butchering however the packing out could prove to be exhausting. Even dragging out my 8 point buck last year from about 3/4 of a mile from the road had me pumping oil coming thru the mountains. I guess I can only hope to have the problem instead of just carrying out my tag.
 

cohunt

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2016
Messages
2,347
Location
Colorado Springs, CO
Yeper indeed. Just got my Muley tag. Preferences my Elk this year, now have two points. 2nd Hunt allows you to buy over counter counter Bull or Cow Elk tags if you desire, don’t take away your preference points. Wanted to harvest one of them Mule Deer Bucks been seeing on my pass Elk Hunt. Plan to put in for Elk next year, maybe, we’ll see. Also Black Bear over counter is a $100 this year, might be picking one of them up as well.
Good Hunting and Safe Time to all those sharing them mountains in Colorado this season. Beware of them cats, they are there and they do stalk you. Kind of keeps them spidey senses in tune. lol
“Yukon”
What cats you talking about? I never seen one :rolleyes:

20181102_165359.jpg


20181102_165349.jpg
 

Trending threads

Top