Cold Barrel Shots

ButterBean

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From my experience....
We shoot at 1000 yds.most weds.am,s...when nothing stands in the way.both prone and bench.
My elevation will change up to 1.5 moa from week to week.
That,s a 21.5# gun.284.cal.180 gr.bullet going 2850 ft./sec
That,s a .25 moa gun,I clean after about 100 rnds.
This is the Long Range Hunting Forum correct ??????????
 

Teri Anne

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So how do we apply this to a hunting situation where we have no idea what time the animal will present itself or the weather and light conditions at that particular moment in time
You do like you always do, point the muzzle towards the intended target, pull the stock firmly into your shoulder, move your cheek into the stock to get a good stock weld, take in a breath, let it about half out, carefully aim making sure that you have your eye centered in the eyepiece, there is a nice round view without any parallax and while holding the reticle on where you want to hit squeeze the trigger until the gun goes off. If you do that the bullet will go straight and true to the target and since you know where the reticle was pointing when the firearm discharged you will know exactly where you hit. When hunting forget about all this petty bull**** and take the best shot you have and let the rifle and bullet do the rest.
 

BillLarson

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You do like you always do, point the muzzle towards the intended target, pull the stock firmly into your shoulder, move your cheek into the stock to get a good stock weld, take in a breath, let it about half out, carefully aim making sure that you have your eye centered in the eyepiece, there is a nice round view without any parallax and while holding the reticle on where you want to hit squeeze the trigger until the gun goes off. If you do that the bullet will go straight and true to the target and since you know where the reticle was pointing when the firearm discharged you will know exactly where you hit. When hunting forget about all this petty bull**** and take the best shot you have and let the rifle and bullet do the rest.
Not bull****.... especially in hunting at long range you must adjust scope to distance.
 

nealm66

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1.5 moa week to week at 1000 yards is a lot. I haven’t seen this. I have fought mirage and wind even at 600 depending on cartridge but out to 800 with the right cartridge and a decent rest and input info I feel pretty good week to week in a decent kill zone. Maybe the effects are more pronounced with a smaller cartridge?
 

ButterBean

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Ok so we have 5 pages of a topic that nobody can tell me how to apply it on a hunt, I personally don't have the time to look up and see if a cloud is going to be over my position and check to see how many lumens i will have at that second, As I said earlier I appreciate all the information but in LRH I don't see where any of this can be applied, No Offense Intended towards anyone
 

nealm66

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Well, it’s all for the interest of learning. Nothing wrong with verifying cold bore shots. I’ve never heard or noticed time of day creating much of a poi change but haven’t explored it that much but will keep it in mind now.
 

Teri Anne

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Not bull****.... especially in hunting at long range you must adjust scope to distance.
OK, we are now delving into the differences between types of scopes. In reality very few hunters have tactical type scopes on their rifles. There are more 3 x 9 x 40 and 4 x 12 x 40 scopes sold at the $100 to $250 price range than any of the more pricey types. Since this is a hunting forum let's address this and make it simple for the average hunter. Scopes of this type do not have the fancy bells and whistles of the more expensive optics. The parallax is set at the factory for 100 yards, there is no adjustment. When these scopes are sighted in it is a a given range with whatever ammo the hunter has decided to use, there is no adjustment. For the purposes of this missive I have chosen the tried and very proven 30-06 rifle and for the ammunition the much used 180 grain in this case Federal Premium Nosler Partition, which by the way is considered to be used on big game, not medium game like deer and antelope where 165 grain is more appropriate. The other reason I selected Federal is due to the absolute wonderful ballistic information on all of their rifle cartridges. https://www.federalpremium.com/rifle/ There are charts for every cartridge/bullet combination made by them. It gives velocity, energy wind drift and bullet drop out to 500 yards for all of their ammunition. With the P3006F Nosler Partition 180 grain bullet leaving the barrel at approximately 2700 FPS (Dependent upon barrel length) the following bullet drop is charted. 100 yards +2.0 inches, 200 yards = Zero, 300 yards -8.5 inches. What does this mean for the average hunter without an adjustable scope. First of all, the rifle can be sighted in for a 200 yard zero simply by sighting it in at 100 yards 2 inches high you have it sighted in at 200 yards and at 300 yards the bullet drop is only 8.5 inches low. Again I am going to reiterate this again, "It is my feeling that for the average hunter they should not be shooting over 200 yards. This is my experienced position and not up for discussion. All of you have your own ideas on this and if you are reading this you probably are not the average hunter. So let's not even go there as far as how far one should be shooting at. With this in mind if the rifle is sighted in at 200 yards if one holds dead on the bullet will never be more than 2 inches off between the muzzle and 200 yards. At 300 yards it will be 8.5 inches low so if the shot is fired held on the shoulder it should remain in the kill zone of the average (Midwest) White Tail deer out to 300 yards. Now with that said there are a lot of variables; shooter skill, rifle shooting 1 MOA or less, wind drift and of course the much argued about lighting and the list goes on. Again, all discussion is welcome with the exception of my 200 yard rule. Looking forward to hearing from you.
 

ButterBean

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OK, we are now delving into the differences between types of scopes. In reality very few hunters have tactical type scopes on their rifles. There are more 3 x 9 x 40 and 4 x 12 x 40 scopes sold at the $100 to $250 price range than any of the more pricey types. Since this is a hunting forum let's address this and make it simple for the average hunter. Scopes of this type do not have the fancy bells and whistles of the more expensive optics. The parallax is set at the factory for 100 yards, there is no adjustment. When these scopes are sighted in it is a a given range with whatever ammo the hunter has decided to use, there is no adjustment. For the purposes of this missive I have chosen the tried and very proven 30-06 rifle and for the ammunition the much used 180 grain in this case Federal Premium Nosler Partition, which by the way is considered to be used on big game, not medium game like deer and antelope where 165 grain is more appropriate. The other reason I selected Federal is due to the absolute wonderful ballistic information on all of their rifle cartridges. https://www.federalpremium.com/rifle/ There are charts for every cartridge/bullet combination made by them. It gives velocity, energy wind drift and bullet drop out to 500 yards for all of their ammunition. With the P3006F Nosler Partition 180 grain bullet leaving the barrel at approximately 2700 FPS (Dependent upon barrel length) the following bullet drop is charted. 100 yards +2.0 inches, 200 yards = Zero, 300 yards -8.5 inches. What does this mean for the average hunter without an adjustable scope. First of all, the rifle can be sighted in for a 200 yard zero simply by sighting it in at 100 yards 2 inches high you have it sighted in at 200 yards and at 300 yards the bullet drop is only 8.5 inches low. Again I am going to reiterate this again, "It is my feeling that for the average hunter they should not be shooting over 200 yards. This is my experienced position and not up for discussion. All of you have your own ideas on this and if you are reading this you probably are not the average hunter. So let's not even go there as far as how far one should be shooting at. With this in mind if the rifle is sighted in at 200 yards if one holds dead on the bullet will never be more than 2 inches off between the muzzle and 200 yards. At 300 yards it will be 8.5 inches low so if the shot is fired held on the shoulder it should remain in the kill zone of the average (Midwest) White Tail deer out to 300 yards. Now with that said there are a lot of variables; shooter skill, rifle shooting 1 MOA or less, wind drift and of course the much argued about lighting and the list goes on. Again, all discussion is welcome with the exception of my 200 yard rule. Looking forward to hearing from you.
@FEENIX , She said average and this is the Long Range Hunting Forum, Long Range being the key words here
Laughing.gif
 

Fedwell

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Ok so we have 5 pages of a topic that nobody can tell me how to apply it on a hunt, I personally don't have the time to look up and see if a cloud is going to be over my position and check to see how many lumens i will have at that second, As I said earlier I appreciate all the information but in LRH I don't see where any of this can be applied, No Offense Intended towards anyone
X-2
 
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