Cleaning both directions ?

jgs8163

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No I’m not, but I’m saying if one is not very careful the steel threaded area on the brush can catch the crown before the nylon enters the crown/bore. I’ve seen damaged crowns and this is usually the only thing we’ve been able to attribute it to. Also some of your longer cleaning rods drag across the crown before this area also. The steel tip of the cleaning rod along with the steel threaded area of the brush can cause damage if one is not careful. I’ve seen guys go at it pretty aggressively with no attention paid to this.
 

ntsqd

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He may not be, but I will. With enough repetition something seemingly soft like a nylon brush can and will eventually damage or wear something a lot harder than it, like a barrel. It will take some time to do it, but by the time the wear is obvious the damage was done some time ago.
 

jgs8163

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Or even bronze?
Yes. Below is direct quote from Krieger website on “cleaning recommendation”.

“Try to avoid dragging items in and out of the muzzle, it will eventually cause uneven wear of the crown. Accuracy will suffer and this can lead you to believe the barrel is shot out, when in fact, it still may have a lot of serviceable life left. A barrel with a worn or damaged crown can be re-crowned and accuracy will usually return. Have the crown checked by a competent gunsmith before giving up on a barrel that may otherwise be in good condition.”
 
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TennJed

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Not trying to be argumentative, just looking for definitive information. Bronze is much softer than steel and it seems surprising that a few strokes periodically by hand would affect steel. I know lots of people say that bronze damages steel, but the WHO also says COVID comes from bats LOL. I agree that very aggressive and continual friction of any kind from muzzle to breach could cause damage to the crown.
 

jgs8163

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Not trying to be argumentative, just looking for definitive information. Bronze is much softer than steel and it seems surprising that a few strokes periodically by hand would affect steel. I know lots of people say that bronze damages steel, but the WHO also says COVID comes from bats LOL. I agree that very aggressive and continual friction of any kind from muzzle to breach could cause damage to the crown.
I gotcha, everyone has their thoughts on this. I’ve been doing it Breech to Muzzle only for a very long time. For me I’ve got no reason to pull a brush back through the bore. It only takes me a little more time to eliminate ANY chance of damaging the crown. All I’m concerned about is the crown and is the reason for my process. Numerous barrel makers recommend this process so that’s what I elect to do.

I also have a very extensive collection of Savage Model 99s and trying to clean them was a absolute PITA. Since MFGs have brought out some of these new chemicals and foams along with Bore snakes it’s helped me repeat the process of breech to muzzle. I had some of the muzzles redone on these 99’s and my accuracy has improved since doing so. Anyways, use for you what works best.
 
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TennJed

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I gotcha, everyone has their thoughts on this. I’ve been doing it Breech to Muzzle only for a very long time. For me I’ve got no reason to pull a brush back through the bore. It only takes me a little more time to eliminate ANY chance of damaging the crown. That’s all I’m concerned about is the crown and is the reason for my process. Numerous barrel makers recommend this process so that’s what I elect to do.

I also have a very extensive collection of Savage Model 99s and trying to clean them was a absolute PITA. Since MFGs have brought out some of these new chemicals and foams along with Bore snakes it’s helped me repeat the process of breech to muzzle. I had some of the muzzles redone on these 99’s and my accuracy has improved since doing so. Anyways, use for you what works best.
Thank you. This makes perfect sense. Why risk any damage when it just takes a few minutes more to unscrew the brush. Going to follow this from now on. Thanks again!
 

meatyrem

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I don’t use any kind of brush.
Only brass and patches and a good cleaner.
Foaming bore to let it sit for a while. Then patches breech to muzzle. When I use boretech I soak the patch and go back and forth a few times never leaving the crown until the last stroke and push it out.
I recently went to the Tipton nickel plated brass jags to prevent the cleaner from eating away my brass jags and to make them last because I can’t see the jags staying concentric from the chemicals eating away at them. Plus it’s hard to tell when it’s clean because the patches will always be blue even if the bore is clean.
 

Greyfox

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Brushes, initial dirty patches, and final lube patches get pushed one direction. Subsequent patches used to remove copper(or stubborn carbon) are run both directions, but with a block at the muzzle to restrict the jag/patch from exiting the bore. The two way scrubbing of the patch/solvent is faster and more effective for removing storm fouling from hard to get rifling corners should it be present. I always use a bore guide.
 
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