Carbon Removal

The Hock

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2007
Messages
305
Location
Colorado mountains
If it were true that the marks are from reaming marks not lapped out then it should follow that only the lands would have the ridges. From the pictures both the lands and grooves have the latitudinal ridges. I have seen the same marks on inexpensive handgun barrels too. That leads me to believe it has something to do with cost cutting and something left out in the rifling process. It could be lack of lapping but the ridges would have then to be transferred to the grooves by the button as it rifled the barrel. Whether or not that is possible requires knowledge of the rifling process I do not possess but knowing machine processes as I do it seems implausible.
 

L.Sherm

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Jul 26, 2017
Messages
4,588
I can assure you, if theres tooling Mark's in the barrel before the button is pulled they will be on the lands and grooves both.
The button will not iron any out.
What is left out is the lapping process no doudt to cut costs.
 

Dirtrax

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 23, 2014
Messages
292
The worst and best tool I’ve bought for cleaning is a borescope. Worst because it can induce needless worries. Best because after you get used to what you’re looking at the feedback is invaluable. Most cleaning solvents work to one degree or another, but seeing the progress guides the effort and process. Without one we’re just guessing.
 

keithcandler

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 30, 2005
Messages
650
If you have a bore scope, you can become your own expert on how a particular bore cleaner works or does not work. I read posts like this in amazement in how some guys love a particular solvent and it does little to remove caked on carbon.
 

stx

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2009
Messages
795
Location
South Texas
$89 model Teslong is awesome to say the least. This gives a very good view of how and what works.

Lots of lessons to be learned with a bore scope.
You’re absolutely right! I just bought a Teslong Borescope and was shocked at the condition of some of my barrels that I thought were “squeaky clean”!
 

epags

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2018
Messages
442
Location
Oxnard, CA
The worst and best tool I’ve bought for cleaning is a borescope. Worst because it can induce needless worries. Best because after you get used to what you’re looking at the feedback is invaluable. Most cleaning solvents work to one degree or another, but seeing the progress guides the effort and process. Without one we’re just guessing.
Thumbs up on that. Just got mine and now I am fretting over all that I see. Ignoring the fire cracking but focusing on the carbon ring.
 
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