Carbon Removal

DSheetz

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Aug 22, 2015
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It is true that CRC makes a non chlorinated form of brakleen as well as a 50 state compliant form . It is also true that 80 years ago a lot of people worked them selves to death well before they were 70 and didn't know any thing about the health hazards of a lot of the chemicals that were being brought out in the market place . I know from experience that you don't want brakleen to be used near welding as I was welding up a coupon and a guy sprayed me and the coupon with the heavy duty green label brakleen it nearly killed me . That sir is why I say read your labels and exercise caution with your use of the chemicals you choose to use for yourself . Heck my Grandmother used DDT mixed with lime to white wash her home to keep the bed bugs out of it in the 30's and 40's as well as all kinds of other chemicals that are no longer on the market .
 

BrentM

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You people are confusing me. I have a New custom rifle with a custom Barrel which I would like to use for a very long time and NOT damage the Barrel while enjoying Hunting and Shooting. Brush or no Brush? Foam or Liquid Chemicals, or just Hoppe's #9? Can there be any real clarification?
Do what you want. After developing bad carbon rings, having issues with blow back using my can, and using a plethora of cleaners, I do what works for me. I was advised to use boretech by a friend who is a respected gunsmith and won't go back. I have others now using it and swearing they'll never go back as well. I hate cleaning so using something that works quickly and effectively is a big deal for me. Like most, I rarely clean copper fouling out, I do clean carbon, and I clean carbon way more than used to. Carbon build up is going to differ for each of us depending on powder used, how much, how over bore the cartridge is, and the rate of fire. I have had some rifles that take 5-10 rounds after cleaning to really settle back in and some don't even need a fouling round fired unless shooting ELR. My preference is to always have fouler down the barrel before hitting the field but when cold clean bore mapping the rifle, some don't care within reasonable distances. So me, I use bore tech cleaners, nylon brushes, chamber/bore guides, a chamber cleaning tool, sonic clean my can and brakes, and the interval depends. I like to clean carbon often and would say 50-100 on most of my rifles is just fine ( I can go longer, but don't). I'll clean copper on oem barrel if it shoots poorly, but custom barrels with proper hand lapping rarely need to be stripped out.
 

Shane Lindsey

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As Gale said:" More rifles are ruined by cleaning rods that shooting."

Shoot em until groups open up, then clean. Most hunting rifles will never get there.


I tried "not cleaning" after hearing folks talk about it and seeing some videos. I did a test on a Rem 5R 300 WM. I put it up for a few months and when I ran a patch down the bore, it was orange. I think if you are not going to clean, you need to shoot often enough that it keeps the carbon from allowing moisture in the bore.

I shoot relatively often and am NOT a believer. I clean after shooting sessions with the exception of hunting season/cold bore work. Any significant amount downrange sees the Bore Tech Eliminator, everytime!
 

BrentM

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I tried "not cleaning" after hearing folks talk about it and seeing some videos. I did a test on a Rem 5R 300 WM. I put it up for a few months and when I ran a patch down the bore, it was orange. I think if you are not going to clean, you need to shoot often enough that it keeps the carbon from allowing moisture in the bore.

I shoot relatively often and am NOT a believer. I clean after shooting sessions with the exception of hunting season/cold bore work. Any significant amount downrange sees the Bore Tech Eliminator, everytime!
I couple years ago I was involved in a test to see why a fouled barrel after sitting a little bit has a POI shift. Most believe a fouled barrel is more repeatable. I noticed that carbon over time goes through an oxidization process and the black or dark gray carbon begins to become chalky and gritty. It also tend to lift off the surface a little. A shot or a dry patch takes that layer off....next shot is back in the group. We also noted a FPS differential from this carbon. So we experimented with a bore snake and dry patch. After the sat for a week or 2 a patch or pass with a dry snake was ran through. The rifle then fired....it put rounds back on track. For me, if hunted 3 weeks ago and fired a couple of rounds, I would not want to clean. However, I will run a patch or snake before heading out. If the atmosphere is very humid (rain, snow, etc) I see the oxidized carbon being even more of a problem.
 

Naymola

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Biged, yep, I've got several cans of Wipeout foam. Used to use it all the time when it first hit the scene, not so much anymore. Then I went with liquid wipeout in conjunction with wipeout accelerator for awhile. The foam does a **** good job of cleaning copper and powder fouling from muzzle brakes.

Brent, when you say it takes time and work, tell me your carbon cleaning regime using Bore Tech

D, I've always wondered what the difference is between the red and greeen cans, I could never get an answer. The wording on the cans seemed to be word for word? For sure, the vapors are bad. As I've gotten older, I'm more sensitive to harmful vapors, especially acetone vapors
 

BrentM

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Using the bore tech carbon remover I wet 3 patches and jag though to saturate the barrel and get the surface residue off. I nylon brush for a count of 30 strokes. Wet patch 3x, repeat brush, wet patch, dry patch to ensure all is clean. I will then wet patch and soak for a few minutes to double check and verify, its clean.

On the crown, I qtip or wet patch the residual off. Running a can the crown is pretty dirty but the bore tech cleans it really quick. Same with the brake, IF I decide to clean it. I only the clean the brake if the carbon is caked enough to flake off. Flaking carbon goes back down the barrel and in to the action. This is why I clean my canned rifles more often now. Especially the can.
 

Naymola

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Muddyboots, Your post were my thoughts exactly. I did the same thing a few years ago, bought everything under the sun and experimented on a retired barrel I had laying around. I was not impressed by any of it. I thought Berryman's parts dip cleaner was going to be encouraging (bought in AZ)

Though I've never tried it but tempted, I've seen "oven cleaner" suggested once on a forum, Wow.....

I've got both red and green cans in my possession, I couldn't get the picture I took of them to load, they both are "Non-Chlorinated". The green is a "50 state formula" I did buy these in California.
 

Tac-O

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The Hock

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Aug 18, 2007
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Colorado mountains
You people are confusing me. I have a New custom rifle with a custom Barrel which I would like to use for a very long time and NOT damage the Barrel while enjoying Hunting and Shooting. Brush or no Brush? Foam or Liquid Chemicals, or just Hoppe's #9? Can there be any real clarification?

Go to this site. https://sharpshootr.com/ I am about to convert to them. They have a carbon cleaner also. Big thing is there is no scrubbing. Look it up.
 

BrentM

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Jan 10, 2013
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Meridian, Idaho
Biged, yep, I've got several cans of Wipeout foam. Used to use it all the time when it first hit the scene, not so much anymore. Then I went with liquid wipeout in conjunction with wipeout accelerator for awhile. The foam does a **** good job of cleaning copper and powder fouling from muzzle brakes.

Brent, when you say it takes time and work, tell me your carbon cleaning regime using Bore Tech

D, I've always wondered what the difference is between the red and greeen cans, I could never get an answer. The wording on the cans seemed to be word for word? For sure, the vapors are bad. As I've gotten older, I'm more sensitive to harmful vapors, especially acetone vapors
Shoot me a pm if you like. I did for this another member too. Facetime or shoot a vid when I use the bore tech and show how it works. For example I drop a dab on the top of the brake and rub it with my finger and show how fast the carbon is removed.
 

jgs8163

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Sep 27, 2011
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Southern Arizona
I rarely use a brush. Just a jag and I never pull it back through the barrel. Patch forward only then I remove the jag. Call it what you will but I don’t want to pull a brush, jag or anything for that matter back in the opposite direction my projectile is going. I use the Wipeout foam products along with their Accelerator product they make with GREAT results. Once in a while a little brake cleaner to follow up. Takes care of Carbon, Copper and powder build up. I also use Chamber mops to clean the chamber of any residue when done. Also if you clean the barrel when it’s still warm the results and ease are better in most cases. Like cleaning a cold greasy frying pan vs a warm one after being done with it. This has worked well for me over years. Good luck!
 

wonderman4

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Oct 7, 2013
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196
Location
South Texas
I think the OP is confused. The carbon we shooters are dealing with is not black. But is as hard as concrete and even more tenacious. If anyone one wants to learn how to deal with removal, just send a request to Tech Support at Bore Tech and the guys there will be happy to coach you thru it. Also, if you want black patches, just scrub the bore with an abrasive cleaner. Even Remington 40X will give black patches and it ain't carbon, it is metal.
 
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